International

Developing Super-Typhoon Aims For The Philippines

A graphic from the U.S. Naval Observatory showing the expected track of Typhoon Haiyan. i

A graphic from the U.S. Naval Observatory showing the expected track of Typhoon Haiyan. U.S. Naval Observatory hide caption

itoggle caption U.S. Naval Observatory
A graphic from the U.S. Naval Observatory showing the expected track of Typhoon Haiyan.

A graphic from the U.S. Naval Observatory showing the expected track of Typhoon Haiyan.

U.S. Naval Observatory

Another super-typhoon is brewing in the western Pacific, and forecasters are saying it will likely slam into the Philippines on Friday, packing winds of 155mph.

Weather Underground meteorologist Jeff Masters says Typhoon Haiyan "will likely be the most dangerous tropical cyclone to affect the Philippines this year."

The Weather Channel says:

"Given this more southern track than past tropical cyclones this season, the Philippine capital of Manila, home to roughly 12 million people in the metro area, is in danger of a direct strike by Haiyan Friday night or early Saturday local time (Friday, U.S. time).

"Furthermore, another tropical cyclone (T.D. 30W) has already soaked parts of the central Philippines. Any additional rain from Haiyan will fall over saturated ground in the central Philippines, raising the threat of flooding and mudslides.

"Haiyan is then expected to sweep quickly into Vietnam by Sunday, possibly still as a strong typhoon."

As of Wednesday morning "the storm is rapidly developing towards the east of Yap and south of Guam. By the time it reaches Yap and Palau residents should be prepared for a full-fledged typhoon packing winds up to 65 knots and heavy rainfall along with the risk of storm surge along the southern edge of Yap and the Northern Coastlines of Palau," says WesternPacificweather.com.

Comments

 

Please keep your community civil. All comments must follow the NPR.org Community rules and terms of use, and will be moderated prior to posting. NPR reserves the right to use the comments we receive, in whole or in part, and to use the commenter's name and location, in any medium. See also the Terms of Use, Privacy Policy and Community FAQ.