International

Costa Rica Advances To First World Cup Quarterfinal

Yeltsin Tejeda of Costa Rica holds up his country's flag in celebration with his teammates after defeating Greece in a penalty shootout during the 2014 FIFA World Cup Brazil Round of 16 match on Sunday. i

Yeltsin Tejeda of Costa Rica holds up his country's flag in celebration with his teammates after defeating Greece in a penalty shootout during the 2014 FIFA World Cup Brazil Round of 16 match on Sunday. Jeff Gross/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption Jeff Gross/Getty Images
Yeltsin Tejeda of Costa Rica holds up his country's flag in celebration with his teammates after defeating Greece in a penalty shootout during the 2014 FIFA World Cup Brazil Round of 16 match on Sunday.

Yeltsin Tejeda of Costa Rica holds up his country's flag in celebration with his teammates after defeating Greece in a penalty shootout during the 2014 FIFA World Cup Brazil Round of 16 match on Sunday.

Jeff Gross/Getty Images

Costa Rica will advance to its first World Cup quarterfinal after winning a 5-3 shootout against Greece on Sunday.

And they did it with only 10 men for most of the second half.

After Costa Rica took the lead early in the second half, defender Oscar Duarte was sent off with a red card in the 66th minute, leaving Greece with a player advantage.

Greece finally made use of it with a late-game goal from Sokratis Papastathopoulos during injury time, sending the game into extra time at 1-1.

Michael Umana scored the decisive penalty in the 5-3 shootout that would advance Costa Rica to the next round.

Next up for Costa Rica is the Netherlands, who defeated Mexico earlier in the day.

Here are some highlights from SBNation:

Costa Rica goalkeeper Keylor Navas' shootout save.

Michael Umaña's winning penalty kick.

The goal from Greece's Sokratis Papastathopoulos that tied the game.

Costa Rica's "goal."

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