Inside NPR

May I Have The Envelope, Please:Recent NPR Awards

This Sunday, the 83rd Annual Academy Awards will honor the year's best movies with all the usual pageantry and hullabaloo. That's probably not news to you, but what you may not know is that this is also the time of year when several awards are given for a decidedly less glamorous profession — journalism. So, before all of those little gold statues are handed out, we wanted to take a moment and recognize some recent winners here at NPR that have been honored for their extraordinary work.

First, The Gracies, given out by The Alliance for Women in Media:

Julie McCarthy is the winner of the esteemed Gracie Award in the Outstanding Reporter/Correspondent category.

This award is a rare and special one recognizing a journalist's body of work. Julie has covered the full range of stories in Pakistan — from last year's catastrophic flood to a range of pieces about the lives of women in Pakistan. As we all know, great editing is a crucial part of the equation – and Julie has some of the best. Her editors, Loren Jenkins, Ted Clark and Doug Roberts, will also receive mention.

Joe Shapiro's investigative series, Seeking Justice for Campus Rapes, won in the Outstanding Hard News Feature category. Another example of great team work. Susanne Reber edited the series and Robert Benincasa provided critical computer-assisted reporting. This was a collaboration with the Center for Public Integrity.

Susan Stamberg won in the Outstanding Portrait/Biography category for Female WWII Pilots: The Original Fly Girls. This was a rich multi-media project and it took a village to create! The interactive content was produced by Cindy Carpien and Heidi Glenn. It was edited by Tanya Ballard Brown, designed by Nelson Hsu —- with a slideshow and video produced by Coburn Dukehart. Keith Jenkins oversaw all the multimedia work. Cindy Carpien also produced the Morning Edition piece, with Shannon Rhoades editing.

And last but not least for the Gracies, Linda Holmes and Joe Matazzoni are winners in the Outstanding Blog category for Monkey See.

Danny Zwerdling and Susanne Reber – along with our partner T. Christian Miller of ProPublica—- are winners of this year's Polk award for radio reporting. This is one of broadcasting's most prestigious awards honoring special achievement in journalism. The team won for Brain Wars – an ongoing series of reports that found the U.S. military falling woefully short in treating soldiers who suffered from traumatic brain injuries.

That same team won another award in the multimedia category from POYI (Pictures of the Year International) —- one of the oldest and most highly respected photojournalism contests. The award was second place for Issue Reporting for the video With Traumatic Brain Injuries, Soldiers Face Battle For Care. It was produced and edited by Coburn Dukehart. Reported by Danny Zwerdling and T. Christian Miller, John Poole shot and edited the interview video, Keith Jenkins and Susanne Reber were the supervising producers.

Our multimedia team won another second place POYI – for the news story Black Hearts about the soldiers of Bravo Company 101st airborne and their work in Afghanistan trying to drive out the Taliban. The story was produced and photographed by David Gilkey; Laura Krantz did the audio editing and Keith Jenkins was the supervising producer.

Congratulations to all the winners. Now, we just want to know what you're wearing to accept your prizes.

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