Behind The Stories

NPR In The News: Station Story Edition

WQXR has deemed November "Beethoven Awareness Month" with these signs around New York City.
WQXR

Every so often we bring you stories of NPR Member stations and the incredible good they do in their individual communities. We aren't the only ones who have noticed the cool things happening around the public radio world. Here are some of the latest pieces in the media:

- WQXR, New York Public Radio's classical music station, has launched a campaign to promote November as "Beethoven Awareness Month" with the message "Obey Thoven." The New York Times has a feature on the tongue-in-cheek idea to raise awareness.

- KACU has come a long way from very humble beginnings in 1986. In the 25 years since, KACU has grown and developed a strong relationship as a member of the Abilene, TX community, and beyond. The Abilene Reporter-News has the story of this station that has defied all odds.

- The Atlanta Journal Constitution reported that WABE in Atlanta just concluded its most successful fundraiser in the station's history, both in terms of money raised and individual pledges.

- Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers played a special concert for KCSN, an NPR Member station at Cal State Northridge, for the station's fall pledge drive. KCSN recently switched from classical music format to contemporary rock, and the concert was a successful entry into this new genre. The Hollywood Reporter, for one, took notice.

- Chicagoist's Steven Pate makes the case for supporting Chicago NPR Member station, WBEZ. In the opinion piece, Pate writes, "If you believe there should be local public radio, you should give money to local public radio. Period. Most of all, thinking of public radio as a public good whose existence is positive for the community, even if it can always be improved, seals the deal for me."

- Last year WHYY launched a hyperlocal community news site for for northwest Philladelphia called NewsWorks. Nieman Journalism Lab checked in with the innovative venture to review its successes and failures thus far.

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