Behind The Stories

NPR In The News: The SXSW Edition

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Since its premiere more than 20 years ago, SXSW has steadily grown in its size and impact on the music, film and interactive industries. NPR Music's presence at the festival has increased significantly over the years as well with last week marking their fifth trip to Austin. This year, NPR shared the music of SXSW with audiences worldwide and found itself in the middle of some of SXSW 2012's more memorable moments. Here are some behind-the-scenes pictures and select press coverage:

- Long before news outlets descended upon Texas for the film, interactive and music portions of SXSW, Austinist, Brooklyn Vegan and other news outlets already had an eye on what NPR Music had in store for music fans this year.

- USA Today's Mike Snider popped in to NPR Music's kick-off SXSW showcase at Stubb's BBQ to review the show and speak with Bob Boilen about Finoa Apple's performance and NPR Music's legacy at the festival.

- Apple's show Wednesday marked her first outside of LA in five years, and she performed some of her most popular songs alongside new ones. Read more about her return to the national spotlight from AP's Chris Talbott here.

- Bruce Springsteen rocked SXSW for the first time in 2012, and NPR Music made sure everyone could watch his keynote speech on Wednesday. Mashable had the skinny on the worldwide live broadcast, a first for the SXSW Music festival.

- Thursday, NPR Music hosted guests at the annual day party "Live from the Parish." This year's lineup included The Magnetic Fields, Lower Dens, Poliça, Sugar Tongue Slim and La Vida Boheme. Read a complete review from Culture Map Austin.

- Esquire offers a nice wrap up of Austin coverage with some festival discoveries from NPR Music's Ann Powers, Bob Boilen, Robin Hilton and Stephen Thompson.

Find even more photos from SXSW 2012 and beyond at the All Songs Considered Flickr page.

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