Inside NPR

Puzzle Guru ProFile: 'It's a high-wire act every week.'

Ask Me Another Puzzle Guru Art Chung during a live taping at The Bell House. i i
Steve McFarland
Ask Me Another Puzzle Guru Art Chung during a live taping at The Bell House.
Steve McFarland

My name... Art Chung
NPR employee since... 2012
Public radio listener since... I fell in love with the All Songs Considered podcasts.
My job at NPR is... Puzzle Editor and "puzzle guru" for Ask Me Another. Along with the horde of writers I keep chained in the NPR basement, I come up with trivia and word games to challenge our brave contestants and celebrity guests, and I get to present them in front of a live studio audience. It's a high-wire act every week.

The one word I always stumble over on stage is... "I" — apparently it's a diphthong. Luckily it's not a very common word.

I'm not as high-pitched as I sound.

The Newscast headline reporting the last year in my life would be... "Can adults with newborns be creative on zero sleep?"

In my suitcase, you'll find... all my clothes rolled up into compact little tubes, because supposedly that's the most efficient way of packing.

I can't live without... my wife, my daughter, and a wireless Internet connection exceeding 30 megabits per second.

If I could share a coffee with anyone, it would be... Doctor Who, because (a) that would mean he's real, and (b) he would probably take me on amazing journeys through space and time and get me home in time for tea.

Ask Me Another question about... pretty much anything — except botany or ballet. Those are my trivia Achilles' heels.

I wanted to be Chief Justice of the Supreme Court when I grew up. Not that I knew what that was, exactly. At this point, I'll settle for the fancy robes.

Listening is most important when... you think you know what the other person is going to say — you probably don't.

I make it a point to never miss... a chance to eat good ramen noodles.


This ProFile feature is just one in a collection of profiles introducing you to the people who bring you NPR. These are the journalists and staff - the names you know and those you don't - who are behind the programming you experience every day that makes NPR, well, NPR.

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