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The Curious Listener: What's Social Media Got To Do With It?

The Curious Listener logo.
Katie Burk/NPR

With Facebook users numbering about a billion and Twitter drawing around 500 million as of June 2012, it is no surprise that many companies have taken notice and created pages to engage with their fans and supporters.

NPR maintains a number of accounts across these two platforms too, each curated for the wide-ranging interests of our audience - from food to politics to NPR people, and everywhere in between. Here's a quick breakdown:

- NPR's editorial Facebook and Twitter accounts focus on our stories and the content we produce across our different on-air shows, podcasts, news desks and digital spaces.

- Our "This is NPR" Facebook page and Twitter account are managed by our corporate team and bring you behind-the-scenes details and insights into NPR life, events you may want to check out, the latest on what's happening with our hosts and staff, and announcements about upcoming programming features you don't want to miss.

Taking part in social media is just one way NPR is connecting with our unique listeners and fans. That's what NPR Listener Services shared recently with Dennis, our Curious Listener. Read on to find out more:

Why should I have to "visit" you on Facebook or Twitter? What's wrong with your basic website?

I suspect that you're trying to collect personal information for marketing purposes.

Dennis

Minneapolis, MN


Dear Dennis,

Thank you for contacting NPR.

NPR offers Facebook and Twitter pages for our audience members who enjoy interacting with one another and discussing NPR stories via those mediums. You are by no means required to view or participate in those pages if you do not wish to. All of NPR's reporting can be found at NPR.org.

Thank you for listening to NPR, and for your continued support of public broadcasting. For the latest news and information, visit NPR.org.

Sincerely,

Justin
NPR Audience Partnership
202-513-3232
www.npr.org

Are You Curious?
Katie Burk/NPR

Send your questions about the inner workings of NPR, something you heard during a program, or anything else NPR-related to NPR Listener Services. Your question and the answer might even end up on the This is NPR blog.

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