I Heart NPR

I Love You More Than I'd Like To Have Jello With Bob Mondello

Writing vows for your wedding is by no means a simple task; to be able to put together the right words to express your love. But if you were a clever groom who was also a fan of public radio, you might start off with:

I love you more than I'd like to have a bagel with Peter Sagal

As part of their special day, Roger Kosson thought it would be clever to include in his vows a few lines about he and his bride's shared passions. The result included, of course, a few of their favorite NPR people. i i

As part of their special day, Roger Kosson thought it would be clever to include in his vows a few lines about he and his bride's shared passions. The result included, of course, a few of their favorite NPR people. Ellie Carleton hide caption

itoggle caption Ellie Carleton
As part of their special day, Roger Kosson thought it would be clever to include in his vows a few lines about he and his bride's shared passions. The result included, of course, a few of their favorite NPR people.

As part of their special day, Roger Kosson thought it would be clever to include in his vows a few lines about he and his bride's shared passions. The result included, of course, a few of their favorite NPR people.

Ellie Carleton

And to reinforce your admiration, you might continue with:

I love you more than I'd like to have sushi with Yuki Noguchi

And us guys, when we start down a road, we stick to our guns. So your next lines might be:

I love you more than I'd like to have:

Tabouli with Neda Ulaby
A samosa with Maria Hinojosa
Veggie lo mein with Renee Montagne
A Greek Eats Yero with Ari Shapiro
A Don's Hamburg with Susan Stamberg
Cincinnati chili five-way with Don Gonyea
A fresca with Mike Pesca
Mint iced tea with Peter Overby
Salt water taffy with Ina Jaffe
Whit's ice cream with Diane Rehm
Strawberry jello with Bob Mondello
And a chocolate malt with Chana Joffe-Walt
Pasta fazooli with David Bianculli
Ravioli with Sylvia Poggioli
And a cannoli with Jim Zarroli

Now, we can't take credit for this tedious research of pronunciation and these creative lines of prose. These are real vows sent in from newly-married Roger Kosson of Granville, Ohio. He has been a devoted listener and self-proclaimed NPR junkie since college, listening to Morning Edition and All Things Considered every day. He says he has too many favorite public radio programs to name just one, but always enjoys listening to Wait Wait... Don't Tell Me! and hopes to meet Host Peter Sagal one day.

A few years ago, Kosson started a new job as a librarian at Denison University. Shortly after that, he was introduced Jill Gillespie, a women's studies teacher at the university. After spending some time with Gillespie, Kosson learned that he had much in common with her, including love for public radio.

Their relationship continued to grow, and in June of this year, Kosson and Gillespie were married. As part of their special day, Kosson thought it would be clever to include a few lines about their shared passions in his vows. The result included, of course, a few of their favorite NPR people.

And how did the bride respond to the NPR-themed vows? "She loved it," Kosson said. i i

And how did the bride respond to the NPR-themed vows? "She loved it," Kosson said. Jeff Sonnabend hide caption

itoggle caption Jeff Sonnabend
And how did the bride respond to the NPR-themed vows? "She loved it," Kosson said.

And how did the bride respond to the NPR-themed vows? "She loved it," Kosson said.

Jeff Sonnabend

Although, how did the bride respond?

"She loved it," Kosson said. "Afterward, my wife said 'You have to send this to NPR.'"

And so, he did.

Congratulations to Kosson and Gillespie on their wedding. We are sure a relationship built on common interest such as public radio is bound to be wonderful.

Have an interesting story that includes NPR? Tell us about it in the comments.


Matthew Butler is a Marketing, Branding and Communication summer intern at NPR. A native of Philly, he can yak about football until he's blue in the face but does not have any other opinions.

Editor's Note: This post has been updated with correct photo credit information.

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