Behind The Stories

10 Years and 50,631 Interviews Later: A Snapshot Of StoryCorps' Achievements

Today the much-loved and notoriously tear-jerking oral history project StoryCorps celebrates its 10th anniversary. You hear StoryCorps each Friday on Morning Edition, when NPR turns over the mic to everyday people to share their stories. The conversations that unfold - heartfelt, intimate, human - help us start our day feeling a little more inspired. To honor the project's anniversary this week and the people at its core, Morning Edition is visiting some of the most memorable participants to see where they are now.

And after 10 years, there's a lot to celebrate, so here's a snapshot of StoryCorps' achievements:

StoryCorps: 10 Years Later i i
Courtesy of StoryCorps
StoryCorps: 10 Years Later
Courtesy of StoryCorps

Scroll through this slideshow to see some special moments from StoryCorps through the years:

  • The stories you hear on NPR are only a small sampling of the thousands of interviews recorded by StoryCorps. Participants receive a hard copy of their conversation and all stories are archived at the American Folklife Center at the Library of Congress.
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    The stories you hear on NPR are only a small sampling of the thousands of interviews recorded by StoryCorps. Participants receive a hard copy of their conversation and all stories are archived at the American Folklife Center at the Library of Congress.
    Courtesy of StoryCorps
  • Ribbon cutting at StoryCorps' Grand Central Terminal studio in October 2003 with (l-r) the late Studs Terkel, popular oral historian and radio personality, and StoryCorps Founder Dave Isay.
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    Ribbon cutting at StoryCorps' Grand Central Terminal studio in October 2003 with (l-r) the late Studs Terkel, popular oral historian and radio personality, and StoryCorps Founder Dave Isay.
    Courtesy of StoryCorps
  • StoryCorps Founder Dave Isay introduces the Grand Center Terminal studio at its launch in 2003.
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    StoryCorps Founder Dave Isay introduces the Grand Center Terminal studio at its launch in 2003.
    Courtesy of StoryCorps
  • An early vision of the StoryCorps studio at Grand Central Terminal in New York City.
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    An early vision of the StoryCorps studio at Grand Central Terminal in New York City.
    Courtesy of StoryCorps
  • The completed studio, pictured here in 2005. The Grand Central location stopped operation in 2008, the same year another StoryCorps studio opened in New York's Foley Square.
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    The completed studio, pictured here in 2005. The Grand Central location stopped operation in 2008, the same year another StoryCorps studio opened in New York's Foley Square.
    Courtesy of StoryCorps
  • On the move: In 2005, StoryCorps launched its first MobileBooth tour to begins its chapter as a traveling oral history project. The StoryCorps Airstream trailer is pictured here at a stop in Kansas City.
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    On the move: In 2005, StoryCorps launched its first MobileBooth tour to begins its chapter as a traveling oral history project. The StoryCorps Airstream trailer is pictured here at a stop in Kansas City.
    Courtesy of StoryCorps
  • During a StoryCorps interview, participants can either talk to a friend or loved one, or StoryCorps facilitators like Virginia Lora, pictured, can conduct the interview. Facilitators also support the interviews with prompts or questions to drive the conversation, if needed.
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    During a StoryCorps interview, participants can either talk to a friend or loved one, or StoryCorps facilitators like Virginia Lora, pictured, can conduct the interview. Facilitators also support the interviews with prompts or questions to drive the conversation, if needed.
    Katie Burk/NPR
  • Two participants sit down inside a StoryCorps MobileBooth to record their story.
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    Two participants sit down inside a StoryCorps MobileBooth to record their story.
    Courtesy of StoryCorps
  • StoryCorps participants (l-r) Norman Bernstein and his daughter Liz Norton stand outside a StoryCorps MobileBooth after recording their conversation in Arlington, Va., last year.
    Hide caption
    StoryCorps participants (l-r) Norman Bernstein and his daughter Liz Norton stand outside a StoryCorps MobileBooth after recording their conversation in Arlington, Va., last year.
    Katie Burk/NPR
  • A peek inside the StoryCorps Airstream trailer where participants have 40 minutes to record their story.
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    A peek inside the StoryCorps Airstream trailer where participants have 40 minutes to record their story.
    Katie Burk/NPR

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View slideshow i

Look out for more special interviews this week on Morning Edition, get to know StoryCorps Founder Dave Isay and be sure to follow all the ways people are celebrating the StoryCorps story (and share your own too) with #StoryCorps10.

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