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Sandwich Mondays

Sandwich Monday: English Chip Butty

The English Chip Butty.
NPR

We're told that the English Chip Butty was invented in Northern England by people who apparently had only four ingredients to work with. It's a triple-decker sandwich, buttered bread, and a pile of fries (french or freedom, up to you), and is traditionally a late-night-so-drunk-you'll-eat-anything kind of a food. Different variations add ketchup or malt vinegar. We added ketchup.

Lorna: This is the sandwich you'd make out of whatever you found stuck in the seats of a minivan after a long trip with the kids.

Ian: You know what would make this even better? If you replaced the fries with a cheeseburger, and ate the fries on the side. And maybe replaced the bread with a sesame seed bun.

A side view.
NPR

Mike: It looks like a British smile.

Robert: It's a lot of starches. It's all starches.

Ian: But there is an Atkin's version. It's a bowl of ketchup and a spoon.

A look within.
NPR

Mike: I'm disgusted with myself for liking this sandwich so much.

Ian: There's something kind of revolting about having a sandwich of carb on carb. It's like it only wants to hang out with its own kind.

Eva: It's a Bigot Sandwich.

Mike eats the sandwich.

Structural integrity did pose a problem. NPR hide caption

itoggle caption NPR

Mike: Usually, the problem with fries is that you can never get enough of them in your mouth at once.

Eva: This sandwich fixes that.

Mike: Yeah, they're all together. It's like an aircraft carrier for french fries.

Peter eats the sandwich.

Peter only appears to be blowing a kiss to the sandwich. We think. NPR hide caption

itoggle caption NPR

Eva: Another plus about this sandwich is you can get the fries fully covered in ketchup—you don't have to leave a dry part to hold it with.

Peter: Yes, when Achilles' mother dipped her fries in ketchup, she always held one part with her hand, and that part is now the only vincible part of the fry.

[The verdict: pretty much everybody agreed the English Chip Butty was less gross than they expected it to be. Still, I don't think any of us will be ordering one anytime soon. Credit where credit is due: we learned of the English Chip Butty in National Geographic.]

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