Wait Wait ... Don't Tell Me!

Product Test: Qwik Shower Gym Class Wipes

The package. i i
NPR
The package.
NPR

Recently we received a review sample of something called "Qwik Shower Gym Class Wipes" at the office. They're basically just giant moist towelettes, which I guess would just be called moist towels.  The press packet says they are to be used "when a shower isn't feasible." There are many situations when this might be the case, such as severe droughts or when grandpa is making moonshine in the bathtub.

I'd just gone running, so we decided to use me as a test subject.

Peter Grosz: You still kind of smell. They're called Gym Class Wipes because you just end up smelling like Gym Class.

Ian: They smell so strongly of alcohol. It's like using Ernest Hemingway as a loofah.

Ian showers. i i
NPR
Ian showers.
NPR

It says in the packet they sent us that they're good for after gym class or "arts & crafts activities." Kids these days must craft really hard.

Mike: I associate that moist towelette smell with eating ribs. It's weird that you're showering with it.

Ian: If I sweated barbecue sauce these would be perfect.

Eva tests the product. Note: Gym Class Wipes are apparently also great if you need to surrender. i i

Eva tests the product. Note: Gym Class Wipes are apparently also great if you need to surrender. NPR hide caption

itoggle caption NPR
Eva tests the product. Note: Gym Class Wipes are apparently also great if you need to surrender.

Eva tests the product. Note: Gym Class Wipes are apparently also great if you need to surrender.

NPR

Ian: It's weird they're called Gym Class Wipes, cause I have a vague memory of kids in gym calling me "Class Wipe."

Mike: I'm trying to see my tenth-grade self using these after gym. Do they do anything to mask the smell of shame?

Grosz: Well, they are the only wipes that remove dodgeball stains.

To sum up how we felt about these, I'd say that as an alternative to showering, they're maybe not the best. But as an alternative to not showering, they're pretty good.

Comments

 

Please keep your community civil. All comments must follow the NPR.org Community rules and Terms of Use. NPR reserves the right to use the comments we receive, in whole or in part, and to use the commenter's name and location, in any medium. See also the Terms of Use, Privacy Policy and Community FAQ.

Wait Wait ... Don't Tell Me!
Wait Wait ... Don't Tell Me!

About