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Sandwich Mondays

Sandwich Monday: The Uncrustables

The main problem with traditional peanut butter and jelly sandwiches is there's no packaging to throw away. i i

The main problem with traditional peanut butter and jelly sandwiches is there's no packaging to throw away. NPR hide caption

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The main problem with traditional peanut butter and jelly sandwiches is there's no packaging to throw away.

The main problem with traditional peanut butter and jelly sandwiches is there's no packaging to throw away.

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Two simple facts: kids hate eating the crust on their sandwiches, and parents hate doing things for their children. Smucker's is here to help with the Uncrustable, which is a crustless flying disc version of a peanut butter and jelly sandwich.

Mike: Like a snake, this sandwich shed its crust. If you look hard enough, you can find its old empty crusts lying around.

Ian: It looks like it has sandwich pattern baldness.

Like a boring UFO. i i

Like a boring UFO. NPR hide caption

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Like a boring UFO.

Like a boring UFO.

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Mike: What if these are little escape pods Peanut Butter and Jelly used to flee Smuckers...and now we're eating them?

Eva: This would make a great tiny pillow. Or a delicious way to pad your bra.

Ian: That comment ruins both sandwiches and bras for me.

A look within. i i

A look within. NPR hide caption

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A look within.

A look within.

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Eva: Uncrustables are perfect for grown-ups who don't have their moms around to cut the crusts off their sandwiches. They're also perfect for soaking up tears when their relationships inevitably fail.

Peter: Peanut butter and jelly used to make me think of my mom. Later, it made me think of my wife, making sandwiches for my kids. Now it makes me think of a 5000 lb industrial stamping press.

Ian: If we're going to have machines do the things parents should be doing, I'd rather this than laser spankings.

Peter Sagal: Uncrustable. i i

Peter Sagal: Uncrustable. NPR hide caption

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Peter Sagal: Uncrustable.

Peter Sagal: Uncrustable.

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Mike: What happens to the crusts they cut off at the factory to make these?

Peter: Right now poor children in Venezuela are eating something called Crustables and celebrating in their 2012 New England Patriot Super Bowl Champion t-shirts.

[The verdict: Not great. A step below a plain old peanut butter and jelly sandwich, though it is less messy. 10 steps below a grilled peanut butter and jelly sandwich, which we highly recommend.]

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