In Hollywood, 50 Is The New 80: What Happens When 'It Girls' Get Old

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Working Out With Hefty Proustian Epics

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Old Family Laundry Gets Unpacked In 'The Vacationers'

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Laura Bridgeman, A Pioneer 50 Years Before Helen Keller

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Bustin' Into June With Sweet, Silly Poetry

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Ralph Ellison in 1957, four years after his novel Invisible Man won the National Book Award. Ellison died in 1994. James Whitmore/The Life Picture Collection/Getty Images hide caption

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Ralph Ellison: No Longer The 'Invisible Man' 100 Years After His Birth

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A Satire Of Literary Prizes Reveals A World Of Insanity

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With Possible Theme Park, 'Hunger Games' May Live Beyond Final Film

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King Richard III, seen here portrayed by actor Paul Daneman in 1962, has often been described as a hunchback. A new study of his skeleton seeks to set the record straight about the monarch's condition. John Franks/Getty Images hide caption

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