Michael Chabon

Books by Michael Chabon

NPR stories about Michael Chabon

Michael Chabon is the author of The Mysteries of Pittsburgh, The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier and Clay and The Yiddish Policemen's Union. Ulf Andersen/Getty Images hide caption

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Michael Chabon's books include The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier & Clay, The Yiddish Policemen's Union and Manhood for Amateurs. He lives in Berkeley, Calif., with his wife, novelist Ayelet Waldman, and their children. Jennifer Chaney hide caption

itoggle caption Jennifer Chaney

Michael Chabon lives in Berkeley with his wife, writer Ayelet Waldman, and their children. Ulf Andersen hide caption

itoggle caption Ulf Andersen

Awesome Man, the creation of author Michael Chabon and illustrator Jake Parker, can shoot positronic rays out of his eyeballs. Click here to read an excerpt of The Astonishing Secret of Awesome Man. Balzer Bray hide caption

itoggle caption Balzer Bray

Michael Chabon won the Pulitzer Prize in 2001 for his book The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier & Clay. His other novels include The Yiddish Policemen's Union, The Mysteries of Pittsburgh and Wonder Boys. courtesy of the author hide caption

itoggle caption courtesy of the author

Michael Chabon won the Pulitzer Prize in 2001 for his book The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier & Clay. His other novels include The Yiddish Policemen's Union, The Mysteries of Pittsburgh> and Wonder Boys. hide caption

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Michael Chabon won the Pulitzer Prize in 2000 for his novel, The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier and Clay. Steven Henry/Getty Images hide caption

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The latest book by Pulitzer Prize-winning author Michael Chabon is Gentlemen of the Road, which was originally serialized in The New York Times Magazine. Fish Fong hide caption

itoggle caption Fish Fong

Author Michael Chabon Vince Bucci/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption Vince Bucci/Getty Images

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