Soccernomics

Why England Loses, Why Germany and Brazil Win, and Why the U.S., Japan, Australia, Turkey—and Even Iraq—are Destined to Become the Kings of the World's Most Popular Sport

by Simon Kuper and Stefan Szymanski

Soccernomics

Paperback, 438 pages, Perseus Books Group, List Price: $16.99 | purchase

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  • Soccernomics
  • Why England Loses, Why Germany and Brazil Win, and Why the U.S., Japan, Australia, Turkey--and Even Iraq--are Destined to Become the Kings of the World's Most Popular Sport
  • Simon Kuper and Stefan Szymanski

Other editions available for purchase:

Paperback, 328 pages, Perseus Books Group, $15.99, published October 27 2009 | purchase
close

Purchase Featured Books

  • Soccernomics
  • Why England Loses, Why Germany and Brazil Win, and Why the U.S., Japan, Australia, Turkey--and Even Iraq--are Destined to Become the Kings of the World's Most Popular Sport
  • Simon Kuper and Stefan Szymanski

Book Summary

Using insights and analogies from economics, statistics, psychology, and business to cast a new and entertaining light on how the game of soccer works, "Soccernomics" reveals the often surprisingly counterintuitive truths about the world's most popular game. An essential guide for the 2010 World Cup.

NPR stories about Soccernomics

Three Books...

Play the Numbers: Three (Useful) Books About Data

The first is from the world of sports. You may be expecting Moneyball, but baseball has always been ripe for analysis — too easy almost. Soccer, though: Now there's a game like the rest of your life — inscrutable, fluid and complex. Forget quantifying every hit or run; some games have no goals at all. Quantify that! But the geeks are starting to notice the beautiful game, and you can read all about it in Soccernomics, by Simon Kuper and Stefan Szymanski. Do blond-haired

New In Paperback

Fresh Perspectives On History, Sports, Wartime And Employment

Piggybacking on the success of the pop-econ book Freakonomics, writer Simon Kuper and economist Stefan Szymanski have joined forces for Soccernomics. Soccer fan and writer Cord Jefferson explains: "Unlike baseball fans, soccer supporters are notoriously averse to numbers — that's what makes Kuper and Szymanski's research so important. Using data about seemingly unrelated topics — like scoring

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