Not Quite What I Was Planning

Six-word Memoirs by Writers Famous and Obscure

by Rachel Fershleiser and Larry Smith

Not Quite What I Was Planning

Paperback, 225 pages, Harpercollins, List Price: $12.99 | purchase

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Book Summary

A compelling, illustrated compilation of six word memoirs, contributed by both famous and obscure writers to Smith magazine, records the human experience in works that are by turn whimsical, poignant, and bizarre, by such authors as Joyce Carol Oates, Deepak Chopra, Sebastian Junger, Joan Rivers, Dave Eggers, Mario Batali, and many others. Original. 40,000 first printing.

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Excerpt: Not Quite What I Was Planning

Not Quite What I Was Planning

Not Quite What I Was Planning

Six-Word Memoirs by Writers Famous and Obscure


HarperCollins Publishers, Inc.

Copyright © 2008 Larry Smith
All right reserved.

ISBN: 9780061374050

Chapter One

After Harvard, had baby with crackhead.
—Robin Templeton

Seventy years, few tears, hairy ears.
—Bill Querengesser

Watching quietly from every door frame.
—Nicole Resseguie

Catholic school backfired. Sin is in!
—Nikki Beland

Savior complex makes for many disappointments.
—Alanna Schubach

Nobody cared, then they did. Why?
—Chuck Klosterman

Some cross-eyed kid, forgotten then found.
—Diana Welch

She said she was negative. Damn.
—Ryan McRae

Born in the desert, still thirsty.
—Georgene Nunn

A sake mom, not soccer mom.
—Shawna Hausman

I asked. They answered. I wrote.
—Sebastian Junger

No future, no past. Not lost.
—Matt Brensilver

Extremely responsible, secretly longed for spontaneity.
—Sabra Jennings

Joined Army. Came out. Got booted.
—Johan Baumeister

Continues...



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