In the Skin of a Lion

A Novel

by Michael Ondaatje

Paperback, 243 pages, Random House Inc, List Price: $14.95 | purchase

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Title
In the Skin of a Lion
Subtitle
A Novel
Author
Michael Ondaatje

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Book Summary

Arriving in Toronto in the 1920s from the Canadian wilderness, Patrick Lewis experiences a series of adventures as he makes a living searching for a missing millionaire, tunnels beneath Lake Ontario, and falls in love.

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Excerpt: In The Skin Of A Lion

In the Skin of a Lion


Vintage Books USA

Copyright © 1997 Michael Ondaatje
All right reserved.

ISBN: 9780679772668

Chapter One

An April night in 1917. Harris and Pomphrey were on the bridge, in the dark wind. Pomphrey had turned west and was suddenly stilled. His hand reached out to touch Harris on the shoulder, a gesture he had never made before.

- Look!

Walking on the bridge were five nuns.


Past the Dominion Steel castings wind attacked the body directly. The nuns were walking past the first group of workers at the fire. The bus, Harris thought, must have dropped them off near Castle Frank and the nuns had, with some confusion at that hour, walked the wrong way in the darkness.

They had passed the black car under the trees and talking cheerfully stepped past the barrier into a landscape they did not know existed - onto a tentative carpet over the piers, among the night labourers. They saw the fire and the men. A few tried to wave them back. There was a mule attached to a wagon. The hiss and jump of machines made the ground under them lurch. A smell of creosote. One man was washing his face in a barrel of water.

The nuns were moving towards a thirty-yard point on the bridge when the wind began to scatter them. They were thrown against the cement mixers and steam shovels, careering from side to side, in danger of going over the edge.

Some of the men grabbed and enclosed them, pulling leather straps over their shoulders, but two were still loose. Harris and Pomphrey at the far end looked on helplessly as one nun was lifted up and flung against the compressors. She stood up shakily and then the wind jerked her sideways, scraping her along the concrete and right off the edge of the bridge. She disappeared into the night by the third abutment, into the long depth of air which held nothing, only sometimes a rivet or a dropped hammer during the day.

Then there was no longer any fear on the bridge. The worst, the incredible had happened. A nun had fallen off the Prince Edward Viaduct before it was even finished. The men covered in wood shavings or granite dust held the women against them. And Commissioner Harris at the far end stared along the mad pathway. This was his first child and it had already become a murderer.

Continues...