A Natural History of the Piano

The Instrument, the Music, the Musicians — From Mozart to Modern Jazz, and Everything in Between

by Stuart Isacoff

A Natural History of the Piano

Paperback, 361 pages, Vintage, List Price: $17.95 | purchase

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Title
A Natural History of the Piano
Subtitle
The Instrument, the Music, the Musicians — From Mozart to Modern Jazz, and Everything in Between
Author
Stuart Isacoff

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Other editions available for purchase:

Hardcover, 361 pages, Random House Inc, $30, published November 15 2011 | purchase

Purchase Featured Book

Title
A Natural History of the Piano
Subtitle
The Instrument, the Music, the Musicians — From Mozart to Modern Jazz, and Everything in Between
Author
Stuart Isacoff

Your purchase helps support NPR Programming. How?

Book Summary

The award-winning founder of Piano Today magazine presents a historical tribute that evaluates the roles of forefront composers and pianists while exploring the artistic development of various genres and the influence of the piano on Western musical traditions.

NPR stories about A Natural History of the Piano

New In Paperback

Portraits Of An Artist, A Correspondent, 'Gossip,' And The 'Piano'

The art of the piano is a study in evolution — of both an instrument and of human talent. Among us there have been a rare few whose gifts included the physical dexterity, the innate musicality and the creativity to make the instrument sound brilliant; Mozart did it first, and, more recently — as Stuart Isacoff notes in his new book, A Natural History of the Piano — so has jazz great Oscar Peterson. In this historical tribute to the piano, the founding editor of Piano Today

Jerry Lee Lewis, a pianist Isacoff classifies as a 'combustible,' performs at the Rainbow in London in 1972. Graham Wood/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption Graham Wood/Getty Images

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