Shadow Of Night

by Deborah Harkness

Shadow of Night

Paperback, 583 pages, Penguin Group USA, List Price: $17 | purchase

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Shadow Of Night
Author
Deborah Harkness

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Hardcover, 592 pages, Viking Adult, $28.95, published July 10 2012 | purchase

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Shadow Of Night
Author
Deborah Harkness

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Book Summary

The sequel to A Discovery of Witches finds Yale professor and reluctant witch Diana Bishop, together with the hunky vampire geneticist Matthew Clairmont, traveling back in time to Elizabethan London. There, Diana studies at Oxford and seeks a magical tutor while Matthew is forced to confront his past. But when an evil cabal steals a mysterious book, the witch-vampire duo set off on a search across Europe to find it.

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Awards and Recognition

9 weeks on NPR Hardcover Fiction Bestseller List

NPR stories about Shadow Of Night

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Critics' Lists: Summer 2012

Literary Look Ahead: 13 Great Books On The Horizon

If you're one of the many people who read Deborah Harkness' A Discovery of Witches last year, good news — your long wait is almost over. The best-selling fantasy novel ended with a cliffhanger, which Harkness' follow-up, Shadow of Night, promises to resolve. When readers last heard from college history instructor (and witch) Diana Bishop and her lover, scientist (and vampire) Matthew Clairmont, they had decided to travel back in time to 16th-century London in order to gain

Note: Book excerpts are provided by the publisher and may contain language some find offensive.

Read an Excerpt: 'Shadow of Night'

Chapter 1

We arrived in an undignified heap of witch and vampire. Matthew was underneath me, his long limbs bent into an uncharacteristically awkward position. A large book was squashed between us, and the force of our landing sent the small silver figurine clutched in my hand sailing across the floor.

"Are we in the right place?" My eyes were screwed shut in case we were still in Sarah's hop barn in twenty-first-century New York, and not in sixteenth-century Oxfordshire. Even so, the unfamiliar scents told me I was not in my own time or place. Among them was something grassy and sweet, along with a waxen smell that reminded me of summer. There was a tang of wood smoke, too, and I heard the crackle of a fire.

"Open your eyes, Diana, and see for yourself." A feather-light touch of cool lips brushed my cheek, followed by a soft chuckle. Eyes the color of a stormy sea looked into mine from a face so pale it could only belong to a vampire. Matthew's hands traveled from neck to shoulders. "Are you all right?"

After journeying so far into Matthew's past, my body felt as though it might come apart with a puff of wind. I hadn't felt anything like it after our brief timewalking sessions at my aunts' house.

"I'm fine. What about you?" I kept my attention fixed on Matthew rather than daring a look around.

"Relieved to be home." Matthew's head fell back on the wooden floorboards
with a gentle thunk, releasing more of the summery aroma from the rushes and lavender scattered there. Even in 1590 the Old Lodge was familiar to him.

My eyes adjusted to the dim light. A substantial bed, a small table, narrow benches, and a single chair came into focus. Through the carved uprights supporting the bed's canopy, I spied a doorway that connected this chamber to another room. Light spilled from it onto the coverlet and floor, forming a misshapen golden rectangle. The room's walls had the same fine, linenfold paneling that I remembered from the few times I'd visited Matthew's home in present-day Woodstock. Tipping my head back, I saw the ceiling—thickly plastered, coffered into squares, with a splashy red-and-white Tudor rose picked out in gilt in each recess.

"The roses were obligatory when the house was built," Matthew commented drily. "I can't stand them. We'll paint them all white at the first opportunity."

The gold-and-blue flames in a stand of candles flared in a sudden draft, illuminating the corner of a richly colored tapestry and the dark, glossy stitches that outlined a pattern of leaves and fruit on the pale counterpane. Modern textiles didn't have that luster.

I smiled with sudden excitement. "I really did it. I didn't mess it up or take us somewhere else, like Monticello or—"

"No," he said with an answering smile, "you did beautifully. Welcome to Elizabeth's England."

For the first time in my life, I was absolutely delighted to be a witch. As a historian I studied the past. Because I was a witch, I could actually visit it. We had come to 1590 to school me in the lost arts of magic, yet there was so much more that I could learn here. I bent my head for a celebratory kiss, but the sound of an opening door stopped me.

Matthew pressed a finger to my lips. His head turned slightly, and his nostrils flared. The tension left him when he recognized who was in the next room, where I could hear a faint rustling. Matthew lifted the book and me in one clean move. Taking my hand, he led me to the door.

In the next room, a man with tousled brown hair stood at a table littered with correspondence. He was of average height, with a neat build and expensive, tailored clothes. The tune he hummed was unfamiliar, punctuated now and again with words too low for me to hear.

Shock passed over Matthew's face before his lips curved into an affectionate smile.

"Where are you in truth, my own sweet Matt?" The man held a page up to the light. In a flash, Matthew's eyes narrowed, indulgence replaced by displeasure.

"Looking for something, Kit?" At Matthew's words the young man dropped the paper to the table and pivoted, joy lighting his face. I'd seen that face before, on my paperback copy of Christopher Marlowe's The Jew of Malta.

"Matt! Pierre said you were in Chester and might not make it home. But I knew you would not miss our annual gathering." The words were familiar enough but coated in a strange cadence that required me to focus on what he was saying in order to understand them. Elizabethan English was neither as unlike modern English as I had been taught nor as easily understandable as I'd hoped, based on my familiarity with Shakespeare's plays.

"Why no beard? Have you been ill?" Marlowe's eyes flickered when they spotted me, nudging me with the insistent pressure that marked him unmistakably as a daemon.

I suppressed an urge to rush at one of England's greatest playwrights and shake his hand before peppering him with questions. What little information I once knew about him flew from my mind now that he was standing before me. Had any of his plays been performed in 1590? How old was he? Younger than Matthew and I, certainly. Marlowe couldn't yet be thirty. I smiled at him warmly.

"Wherever did you find that?" Marlowe pointed, his voice dripping with contempt. I looked over my shoulder, expecting to see some hideous work of art. There was nothing but empty space.

He meant me. My smile faltered.

"Gently, Kit," Matthew said with a scowl.

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