2312

Hardcover, 561 pages, Orbit, List Price: $25.99 | purchase

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  • 2312
  • Kim Stanley Robinson

NPR Summary

The latest novel from Robinson, author of the celebrated "Mars Trilogy," deals with what's happened to humanity since colonizing most of the solar system. The action begins when a politician-scientist from Mercury secretly makes a disturbing discovery about how power is being consolidated among just a few planets in the system. But just as she and her colleagues decide to do something about it, a series of possible crimes undermine their cause — including the politician's death. The politician's troubled granddaughter Swan, an artist and biosphere designer, is left to deal with the consequences.

NPR stories about 2312

Best Books Of 2012

The Year's Best Science Fiction Crosses Galaxies And Genres

A sweeping space opera, 2312 is about what happens to humanity once we've truly conquered the solar system. Humans have colonized most of the planets and moons in our local volume of space, and it's the end of an interplanetary age of exploration. Political powers are consolidating their territories — China and India are vying to control Venus, while a host of newer states from Mercury and the outer planets are in conflict over who controls access to powerful mirrors that beam solar

Annalee Newitz

Critics' Lists: Summer 2012

Summer's Best Sci-Fi: Planets, Politics, Apocalypse

The latest novel from Robinson, author of the celebrated Mars trilogy, deals with what's happened to humanity since colonizing most of the solar system. A brilliant, plausible account of how humans might colonize planets, moons and asteroids, 2312 is also about the future of art and family. The action begins when a politician-scientist from Mercury secretly makes a disturbing discovery about how power is being consolidated among just a few planets in the system. But just as she and

Annalee Newitz

Reviews From The NPR Community

 

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