A Farewell to Arms

The Hemingway Library Edition

by Ernest Hemingway

A Farewell to Arms

Hardcover, 330 pages, Scribner, List Price: $27 | purchase

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Book Summary

Featuring a previously published author introduction, a personal foreword by his son and a new introduction by his grandson, a definitive edition of the lauded World War I classic collects all of the author's alternate endings to offer new insights into his creative process.

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NPR stories about A Farewell to Arms

Critics' Lists: Summer 2012

Lesser-Known Lit: Seeking Summer's Hidden Gems

Obviously, A Farewell to Arms is a gem — there's hardly anyone who hasn't been socked in the gut by its bracing prose and bleak story. But hidden? Any Hemingway fan worth his sweat knows Papa was a compulsive re-writer, and if you've ever wanted to see those hidden drafts — those gems if you will — here they are. Famously, Hemingway said he rewrote the last page of A Farewell to Arms 39 times before he was "satisfied." Apocryphal? As it turns out, yes.

Note: Book excerpts are provided by the publisher and may contain language some find offensive.

Excerpt: A Farewell To Arms: The Hemingway Library Edition

Chapter One

In the late summer of that year we lived in a house in a village that looked across the river and the plain to the mountains. In the bed of the river there were pebbles and boulders, dry and white in the sun, and the water was clear and swiftly moving and blue in the channels. Troops went by the house and down the road and the dust they raised powdered the leaves of the trees. The trunks of the trees too were dusty and the leaves fell early that year and we saw the troops marching along the road and the dust rising and leaves, stirred by the breeze, falling and the soldiers marching and afterward the road bare and white except for the leaves.

The plain was rich with crops; there were many orchards of fruit trees and beyond the plain the mountains were brown and bare. There was fighting in the mountains and at night we could see the flashes from the artillery. In the dark it was like summer lightning, but the nights were cool and there was not the feeling of a storm coming.

Sometimes in the dark we heard the troops marching under the window and guns going past pulled by motor-tractors. There was much traffic at night and many mules on the roads with boxes of ammunition on each side of their pack-saddles and gray motor trucks that carried men, and other trucks with loads covered with canvas that moved slower in the traffic. There were big guns too that passed in the day drawn by tractors, the long barrels of the guns covered with green branches and green leafy branches and vines laid over the tractors. To the north we could look across a valley and see a forest of chestnut trees and behind it another mountain on this side of the river. There was fighting for that mountain too, but it was not successful, and in the fall when the rains came the leaves all fell from the chestnut trees and the branches were bare and the trunks black with rain. The vineyards were thin and bare-branched too and all the country wet and brown and dead with the autumn. There were mists over the river and clouds on the mountain and the trucks splashed mud on the road and the troops were muddy and wet in their capes; their rifles were wet and under their capes the two leather cartridge-boxes on the front of the belts, gray leather boxes heavy with the packs of clips of thin, long 6.5 mm. cartridges, bulged forward under the capes so that the men, passing on the road, marched as though they were six months gone with child.

There were small gray motor cars that passed going very fast; usually there was an officer on the seat with the driver and more officers in the back seat. They splashed more mud than the camions even and if one of the officers in the back was very small and sitting between two generals, he himself so small that you could not see his face but only the top of his cap and his narrow back, and if the car went especially fast it was probably the King. He lived in Udine and came out in this way nearly every day to see how things were going, and things went very badly.

At the start of the winter came the permanent rain and with the rain came the cholera. But it was checked and in the end only seven thousand died of it in the army.

Excerpted from A Farewell to Arms: The Hemingway Library Edition by Ernest Hemingway. Copyright 2012 by The Hemingway Copyright Owners. Excerpted with permission of Scribner.

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