Incarnadine

Poems

by Mary Szybist

Incarnadine

Paperback, 72 pages, Farrar Straus & Giroux, List Price: $15 | purchase

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Incarnadine
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Poems
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Mary Szybist

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NPR Summary

Ten years after her debut collection, Mary Szybist returns with this long-awaited second book, a skeptic's consideration of the spiritual. Mixing the profane and the divine, she presents several unusual Annunciations; blurring the lines between herself and the Virgin, she provides an "Update on Mary." The poems are experimental in form — lines radiating out from an empty center, a poem consisting of a diagrammed sentence — and meditative in tone, finding beauty, sorrow and the divine in unexpected corners of modern life.

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Ten years after her debut collection, Mary Szybist returns with this long-awaited second book, a skeptic's consideration of the spiritual. Mixing the profane and the divine, she presents several unusual Annunciations; blurring the lines between herself and the Virgin, she provides an "Update on Mary." The poems are experimental in form — lines radiating out from an empty center, a poem consisting of a diagrammed sentence — and meditative in tone, finding beauty, sorrow and the

Poetry

Guns, God And A Reggae Beat: A 2013 Poetry Preview

Poetry readers in the know have been waiting a decade for this book, the second by Szybist. Her first book, Granted, was among the most remarkable debuts of the new century. Szybist is a skeptic who thinks a lot about faith, a believer in doubt, though as a series of "Announcement" poems attest, she finds God all around — in everything from the distracted discourse of former President Bush to the sound of "a vacuum / start[ing] up next door." She's also a restless formal

Craig Morgan Teicher

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