We Are All Completely Beside Ourselves

by Karen Joy Fowler

We are all completely beside ourselves

Paperback, 310 pages, Penguin Group USA, List Price: $16 | purchase

close

Purchase Featured Books

  • We Are All Completely Beside Ourselves
  • Karen Joy Fowler

Other editions available for purchase:

Hardcover, 310 pages, Penguin Group USA, $10, published May 30 2013 | purchase
close

Purchase Featured Books

  • We Are All Completely Beside Ourselves
  • Karen Joy Fowler

NPR Summary

Eighteen-year-old Rosemary evaluates how her entire youth was defined by the presence and forced removal of a chimpanzee who was secretly regarded as a family member and who Rosemary loved as a sister.

Read an excerpt of this book

Genres:

Awards and Recognition

1 week on NPR Hardcover Fiction Bestseller List

NPR stories about We Are All Completely Beside Ourselves

Critics' Lists: Summer 2013

Secrets Of The Universe: 5 Great SF And Fantasy Summer Reads

Most people know Fowler's novel The Jane Austen Book Club, but she's known in science fiction circles for work that straddles the line between realism and speculative ideas. This new novel, an emotionally intense meditation on how science transforms human life, is one of her strongest works yet. Fowler unspools the story of Rosemary, a woman coming to terms with her deeply troubled relationship with her twin sister. Their father, a psychologist, decided to see what would happen if

Annalee Newitz

Note: Book excerpts are provided by the publisher and may contain language some find offensive.

Excerpt: We Are All Completely Beside Ourselves

So the middle of my story comes in the winter of 1996. By then, we'd long since dwindled to the family that old home movie foreshadowed — me, my mother, and, unseen but evident behind the camera, my father. In 1996, ten years had passed since I'd last seen my brother, seventeen since my sister disappeared. The middle of my story is all about their absence, though if I hadn't told you that, you might not have known. By 1996, whole days went by in which I hardly thought of either one.

1996. Leap year. Year of the Fire Rat. President Clinton had been reelected; this would all end in tears. Kabul had fallen to the Taliban. The Siege of Sarajevo had ended. Charles had recently divorced Diana.

Hale-Bopp came swinging into our sky. Claims of a Saturn-like object in the comet's wake first surfaced that November. Dolly, the cloned sheep, and Deep Blue, the chess-playing computer program, were superstars. There was evidence of life on Mars. The Saturn-like object in Hale-Bopp's tail was maybe an alien spaceship. In May of '97, thirty-nine people would kill themselves as a prerequisite to climbing aboard.

Against this backdrop, how ordinary I look. In 1996, I was twenty-two years old, meandering through my fifth year at the University of California, Davis, and still maybe only a junior or maybe a senior, but so thoroughly uninterested in the niceties of units or requirements or degrees that I wouldn't be graduating anytime soon. My education, my father liked to point out, was wider than it was deep. He said this often.

But I saw no reason to hurry. I'd no particular ambitions beyond being either widely admired or stealthily influential — I was torn between the two. It hardly mattered, as no major seemed to lead reliably to either.

My parents, who were still paying my expenses, found me aggravating. My mother was often aggravated those days. It was something new for her, analeptic doses of righteous aggravation. She was rejuvenated by it. She'd recently announced that she was through being a translator and go-between for me and my father; he and I had hardly spoken since. I don't remember minding. My father was himself a college professor and a pedant to the bone. Every exchange contained a lesson, like the pit in a cherry. To this

day, the Socratic method makes me want to bite someone.

Autumn came suddenly that year, like a door opening. One morning I was bicycling to class when a large flock of Canada geese passed overhead. I couldn't see them, or much of anything else, but I heard the jazzy honking above me. There was a tule fog off the fields and I was wrapped inside it, pedaling through clouds. Tule fogs are not like other fogs, not spotty or drifting, but fixed and substantial. Probably anyone would have felt the risk of moving quickly through an unseen world, but I have — or had as a child — a particular penchant for slapstick and mishap, so I took the full thrill from it.

I felt polished by the wet air and maybe just a little migratory myself, just a little wild. This meant I might flirt a bit in the library if I sat next to anyone flirtable or I might daydream in class. I often felt wild back then; I enjoyed the feeling, but nothing had ever

come of it.

At lunchtime I grabbed something, probably grilled cheese, let's say it was grilled cheese, in the school cafeteria. I was in the habit of leaving my books on the chair next to me, where they could

be quickly moved if someone interesting came by but would discourage the uninteresting. At twenty-two, I had the callowest possible definition of interesting and, by the measure of my own calipers, was far from interesting myself.

A couple was sitting at a table near me and the girl's voice gradually rose to the point where I was forced to pay attention. "You want some fucking space?" she said. She was wearing a short blue T-shirt and a necklace with a glass pendant of an angelfish. Long, dark hair fell in a messy braid down her back. She stood and cleared the table with one motion of her arm. She had beautiful biceps; I remember wishing I had arms like hers.

Dishes fell to the floor and shattered; catsup and cola spilled and mixed in the breakage. There must have been music in the background, because there's always music in the background now, our whole lives sound-tracked (and most of it too ironic to be random. I'm just saying), but honestly I don't remember. Maybe there was only a sweet silence and the spit of grease on the grill.

"How's that?" the girl asked. "Don't tell me to be quiet. I'm just making more space for you." She pushed the table itself over, swung it to one side, dropped it. "Better?" She raised her voice. "Can everyone please leave the room so my boyfriend has more space? He needs a fucking lot of space." She slammed her chair down onto the pile of catsup and dishes. More sounds of breakage and a sudden waft of coffee.

The rest of us were frozen — forks halfway to our mouths, spoons dipped in our soups, the way people were found after the eruption of Vesuvius.

"Don't do this, baby," her boyfriend said once, but she was doing it and he didn't bother to repeat himself. She moved to another table, empty except for a tray with dirty dishes. There, she methodically broke everything that could be broken, threw everything

that could be thrown. A saltshaker spun across the floor to my foot.

A young man rose from his seat, telling her, with a slight stutter, to take a chill pill. She threw a spoon that bounced audibly off his forehead. "Don't side with assholes," she said. Her voice was very not chill.

He sank back, eyes wide. "I'm okay," he assured the room at large, but he sounded unconvinced. And then surprised. "Holy shit! I've been assaulted."

"This is just the shit I can't take," the boyfriend said. He was a big guy, with a thin face, loose jeans, and a long coat. Nose like a knife. "You go ahead and tear it up, you psycho bitch. Just give me back the key to my place first."

She swung another chair, missing my head by maybe four feet — I'm being charitable; it seemed like a lot less — striking my table and upsetting it. I grabbed my glass and plate. My books hit the floor with a loud slap. "Come and get it," she told him.

It struck me funny, a cook's invitation over a pile of broken plates, and I laughed once, convulsively, a strange duck-like hoot that made everyone turn. And then I stopped laughing, because it was no laughing matter, and everyone turned back. Through the glass walls I could see some people on the quad who'd noticed the commotion and were watching. A threesome on their way in for lunch stopped short at the door.

"Don't think I won't." He took a few steps in her direction. She scooped up a handful of catsup-stained sugar cubes and threw them.

"I'm finished," he said. "We're finished. I'm putting your shit in the hallway and I'm changing the locks." He turned and she threw a glass, which bounced off his ear. He missed a step, staggered, touched the spot with one hand, checked his fingers for blood. "You owe me for gas," he said without looking back. "Mail it." And he was gone.

There was a moment's pause as the door closed. Then the girl turned on the rest of us. "What are you losers looking at?" She picked up one of the chairs and I couldn't tell if she was going to put it back or throw it. I don't think she'd decided.

A campus policeman arrived. He approached me cautiously, hand on his holster. Me! Standing above my toppled table and chair, still holding my harmless glass of milk and my plate with the harmless half-eaten grilled cheese sandwich. "Just put it down, honey," he said, "and sit for a minute." Put it down where? Sit where? Nothing in my vicinity was upright but me. "We can talk about this. You can tell me what's going on. You're not in any trouble yet."

"Not her," the woman behind the counter told him. She was a large woman, and old — forty or more — with a beauty mark on her upper lip and eyeliner collecting in the corners of her eyes. You all act like you own the place, she'd said to me once, on another occasion, when I sent back a burger for more cooking. But you just come

and go. You don't even think how I'm the one who stays.

"The tall one," she told the cop. She pointed, but he was paying no attention, so intent on me and whatever my next move would be." Calm down," he said again, soft and friendly. "You're not in any trouble yet." He stepped forward, passing right by the girl with the braid and the chair. I saw her eyes behind his shoulder.

"Never a policeman when you need one," she said to me. She smiled and it was a nice smile. Big white teeth. "No rest for the wicked." She hoisted the chair over her head. "No soup for you." She launched it away from me and the cop, toward the door. It

landed on its back.

When the policeman turned to look, I dropped my plate and my fork. I honestly didn't mean to. The fingers of my left hand just unclenched all of a sudden. The noise spun the cop back to me.

I was still holding my glass, half full of milk. I raised it a little, as if proposing a toast. "Don't do it," he said, a whole lot less friendly now. "I'm not playing around here. Don't you fucking test me."

And I threw the glass onto the floor. It broke and splashed milk over one of my shoes and up into my sock. I didn't just let it go. I threw that glass down as hard as I could.

From We Are All Completely Beside Ourselves by Karen Joy Fowler. Copyright 2013 by Karen Joy Fowler. Excerpted by permission of Putnam.

Reviews From The NPR Community

 

Please keep your community civil. All comments must follow the NPR.org Community rules and Terms of Use. NPR reserves the right to use the comments we receive, in whole or in part, and to use the commenter's name and location, in any medium. See also the Terms of Use, Privacy Policy and Community FAQ.

Support comes from: