The Color Master

Stories

by Aimee Bender

The Color Master

Hardcover, 222 pages, Random House Inc, List Price: $25.95 | purchase

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Book Summary

This volume of tales features characters who pursue connections through love, sex and family, including a golden-haired girl who appears in an orchard to apple-eating attendants and a woman who cannot resume normal life after sharing a fantasy with her husband.

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Excerpt: The Color Master

Appleless

I once knew a girl who wouldn't eat apples. She wove her walking around groves and orchards. She didn't even like to look at them. They're all mealy, she said. Or else too cheeky, too bloomed. No, she stated again, in case we had not heard her, our laps brimming with Granny Smiths and Red Deliciouses. With Galas and Spartans and yellow Golden Globes. But we had heard her, from the very first; we just couldn't help offering again. Please, we pleaded, eat. Cracking our bites loudly, exposing the dripping wet white inside.

It's unsettling to meet people who don't eat apples.

The rest of us now eat only apples, to compensate. She has declared herself so apple-less, we feel we have no other choice. We sit in the orchard together, cross-legged, and when they fall off the trees into our outstretched hands, we bite right in. They are pale green, striped red-on-red, or a yellow-and-orange sunset. They are the threaded Fujis, with streaks of woven jade and beige, or the dark and rosy Rome Beauties. Pippins, Pink Ladies, Braeburns, McIntosh. The orchard grows them all.

We suck water off the meat. Drink them dry. We pick apple skin out from the spaces between our teeth. We eat the stem and the seeds. For the moment, there are enough beauties bending the branches for all of us to stay fed.

From The Color Master by Aimee Bender. Copyright 2013 by Aimee Bender. Excerpted by permission of Doubleday.

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