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A Spool of Blue Thread

by Anne Tyler

Hardcover, 357 pages, Random House Inc, List Price: $25.95 |

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A Spool of Blue Thread
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Anne Tyler

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NPR Summary

The changing needs of aging parents impact a family gathering during which Abby Whitshank relates how her husband and she fell in love during the summer of 1959 and shares decades of marriage impacted by children and long-held secrets.

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Awards and Recognition

16 weeks on NPR Hardcover Fiction Bestseller List

Note: Book excerpts are provided by the publisher and may contain language some find offensive.

Excerpt: A Spool of Blue Thread

Late one July evening in 1994, Red and Abby Whitshank had a phone call from their son Denny. They were getting ready for bed at the time. Abby was standing at the bureau in her slip, drawing hairpins one by one from her scattery sand-colored topknot. Red, a dark, gaunt man in striped pajama bottoms and a white T‑shirt, had just sat down on the edge of the bed to take his socks off; so when the phone rang on the nightstand beside him, he was the one who answered. "Whitshank residence," he said.

And then, "Well, hey there."

Abby turned from the mirror, both arms still raised to her head.

"What's that," he said, without a question mark.

"Huh?" he said. "Oh, what the hell, Denny!"

Abby dropped her arms.

"Hello?" he said. "Wait. Hello? Hello?"

He was silent for a moment, and then he replaced the receiver.

"What?" Abby asked him.

"Says he's gay."

"What?"

"Said he needed to tell me something: he's gay."

"And you hung up on him!"

"No, Abby. He hung up on me. All I said was 'What the hell,' and he hung up on me. Click! Just like that."

"Oh, Red, how could you?" Abby wailed. She spun away to reach for her bathrobe—a no-color chenille that had once been pink. She wrapped it around her and tied the sash tightly. "What possessed you to say that?" she asked him.

"I didn't mean anything by it! Somebody springs something on you, you're going to say 'What the hell,' right?"
Abby grabbed a handful of the hair that pouffed over her forehead.

"All I meant was," Red said, " 'What the hell next, Denny? What are you going to think up next to worry us with?' And he knew I meant that. Believe me, he knew. But now he can make this all my fault, my narrow-mindedness or fuddy-duddiness or whatever he wants to call it. He was glad I said that to him. You could tell by how fast he hung up on me; he'd been just hoping all along that I would say the wrong thing."

"All right," Abby said, turning practical. "Where was he calling from?"

"How would I know where he was calling from? He doesn't have a fixed address, hasn't been in touch all summer, already changed jobs twice that we know of and probably more that we don't know of . . . A nineteen-year-old boy and we have no idea what part of the planet he's on! You've got to wonder what's wrong, there."
"Did it sound like it was long distance? Could you hear that kind of rushing sound? Think. Could he have been right here in Baltimore?"

"I don't know, Abby."

She sat down next to him. The mattress slanted in her direction; she was a wide, solid woman. "We have to find him," she said. Then, "We should have that whatsit—caller ID." She leaned forward and gazed fiercely at the phone. "Oh, God, I want caller ID this instant!"

"What for? So you could phone him back and he could just let it ring?"

"He wouldn't do that. He would know it was me. He would answer, if he knew it was me."

She jumped up from the bed and started pacing back and forth, up and down the Persian runner that was worn nearly white in the middle from all the times she had paced it before. This was an attractive room, spacious and well designed, but it had the comfortably shabby air of a place whose inhabitants had long ago stopped seeing it.

"What did his voice sound like?" she asked. "Was he nervous? Was he upset?"

"He was fine."

"So you say. Had he been drinking, do you think?"

"I couldn't tell."

"Were other people with him?"

"I couldn't tell, Abby."

"Or maybe . . . one other person?"

He sent her a sharp look. "You are not thinking he was serious," he said.

"Of course he was serious! Why else would he say it?"

"The boy isn't gay, Abby."

"How do you know that?"

"He just isn't. Mark my words. You're going to feel silly, by and by, like, 'Shoot, I overreacted.' "

"Well, naturally that is what you would want to believe."

"Doesn't your female intuition tell you anything at all? This is a kid who got a girl in trouble before he was out of high school!"

"So? That doesn't mean a thing. It might even have been a symptom."

"Come again?"

"We can never know with absolute certainty what another person's sex life is like."

"No, thank God," Red said.

He bent over, with a grunt, and reached beneath the bed for his slippers. Abby, meanwhile, had stopped pacing and was staring once more at the phone. She set a hand on the receiver. She hesitated. Then she snatched up the receiver and pressed it to her ear for half a second before slamming it back down.

"The thing about caller ID is," Red said, more or less to himself, "it seems a little like cheating. A person should be willing to take his chances, answering the phone. That's kind of the general idea with phones, is my opinion."
He heaved himself to his feet and started toward the bathroom. Behind him, Abby said, "This would explain so much! Wouldn't it? If he should turn out to be gay."

Red was closing the bathroom door by then, but he poked his head back out to glare at her. His fine black eyebrows, normally straight as rulers, were knotted almost together. "Sometimes," he said, "I rue and deplore the day I married a social worker."

Then he shut the door very firmly.

When he returned, Abby was sitting upright in bed with her arms clamped across the lace bosom of her nightgown. "You are surely not going to try and blame Denny's problems on my profession," she told him.
"I'm just saying a person can be too understanding," he said. "Too sympathizing and pitying, like. Getting into a kid's private brain."

"There is no such thing as 'too understanding.' "

"Well, count on a social worker to think that."

She gave an exasperated puff of a breath, and then she sent another glance toward the phone. It was on Red's side of the bed, not hers. Red raised the covers and got in, blocking her view. He reached over and snapped off the lamp on the nightstand. The room fell into darkness, with just a faint glow from the two tall, gauzy windows overlooking the front lawn.

Excerpted from A Spool of Blue Thread by Anne Tyler. Copyright 2015 by Anne Tyler. Excerpted by permission of Alfred A. Knopf, a division of Random House LLC.