The Nashville Symphony In Concert Last May the gorgeous concert hall of the Nashville Symphony was flooded with 24 feet of water. Hear the orchestra return to its refurbished home in this concert, with Nicholas McGegan conducting.

The Nashville Symphony celebrates the return to its acoustically rich concert hall after last spring's devastating flood. Harry Butler hide caption

toggle caption
Harry Butler

The Nashville Symphony celebrates the return to its acoustically rich concert hall after last spring's devastating flood.

Harry Butler

Classics in Concert

The Nashville Symphony In ConcertAmerican Public Media

The Nashville Symphony In Concert

  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/132654102/132726138" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

During the first two days of May 2010, nearly 14 inches of rain fell in Nashville — more than doubling the two-day record set when a hurricane swept through 30 years earlier. The Cumberland River crested 12 feet above flood stage and the city was inundated with thick, muddy water. Thirty-one people lost their lives. Damages totaled at least $1.5 billion.

Every person, every structure, every corner of Nashville was affected. In Nashville's lively music scene, the Grand Ole Opry House was under 10 feet of water. The Country Music Hall of Fame took on five feet. And Schermerhorn Symphony Center, a magnificent $123-million hall that opened in 2006 as home to the Nashville Symphony Orchestra, took on 5 million gallons, 24 feet deep.

On the night of the floods, members of the symphony who could get to the Schermerhorn stacked sandbags, with help from community volunteers. Despite their efforts, water cascaded into the sub-basement and most of the basement. Two 9-foot Steinway grand pianos were destroyed. Fifty other instruments were wiped out. It appeared the water would fill the main hall, but the deluge stopped rising — with five inches to spare.

Schermerhorn and Nashville Symphony staff quickly assessed the damage: $42 million of work before the symphony could return. Having recently raised a tremendous amount of money to build the hall, was there any chance of raising the repair money in a down economy?

Eight months later, not only has the money been raised, the repairs are complete. The Nashville Symphony played their first concert back home on New Year's Eve. Our live broadcast this Thursday, Jan. 6 will highlight the return of a great American orchestra, and celebrate the resilience and spirit of a great American city.

Nicholas McGegan conducts the Nashville Symphony at the newly restored Schermerhorn Symphony Center in Mendelssohn's Overture to The Fair Melusina, Mozart's Piano Concerto No. 22 and Beethoven's Fourth Symphony. I'll provide live commentary, interview members of the orchestra, and during this evening of great music, we won't take a single note for granted.

Program

Nicholas McGegan, conductor

  • Mendelssohn: Overture to Fair Melusine
  • Mozart: Piano Concerto No. 22 with Robert Levin, piano
  • Beethoven: Symphony No. 4
[+] read more[-] less

More From Classical

Penguin Cafe performs a Tiny Desk Concert on May 2, 2017. (Claire Harbage/NPR) Claire Harbage/NPR hide caption

toggle caption Claire Harbage/NPR

Tiny Desk

Penguin Cafe

Penguin Cafe folds in sounds from around the world and throughout music history — Africa, Kraftwerk, Brazil and Franz Schubert.

Composer Anna Thorvaldsdottir revised her piece Aura especially for The Los Angeles Percussion Quartet. David Holechek hide caption

toggle caption David Holechek

All Songs TV

Anna Thorvaldsdottir's Volcanic Transmissions

As members of the Los Angeles Percussion Quartet bow their vibraphones, brush their gongs and message their bass drums, the composer's evocative music oozes from blackness.

Ludovico Einaudi, performing live for KCRW. Larry Hirshowitz/KCRW hide caption

toggle caption Larry Hirshowitz/KCRW

Favorite Sessions

Ludovico Einaudi, 'Petricor' (Live)

KCRW

Watch the pianist and composer, joined by a full band, in a stunning live performance for KCRW.

Opera singer Joyce DiDonato created this video to go with her new album, In War and Peace: Harmony through Music. Warner Classics hide caption

toggle caption Warner Classics

Music

In Chaotic Times, A Singer's Plea For Freedom

Opera star Joyce DiDonato does more than sing — she lends her voice to social causes. Watch her new video, a haunting depiction of a woman trapped in conflict.

Gustavo Dudamel led the Simón Bolívar Symphony Orchestra to open the new season of concerts at Carnegie Hall Thursday, Oct. 6. Chris Lee/Carnegie Hall hide caption

toggle caption Chris Lee/Carnegie Hall

Carnegie Hall Live

Gustavo Dudamel Opens Carnegie Hall Season With 'The Rite Of Spring'

WQXR radio

The charismatic conductor first heard Stravinsky's rambunctious music when he was just 8. Watch him lead the Simón Bolívar Symphony Orchestra of Venezuela live on Thursday night.

A still from Maya Beiser's "Air" video. Courtesy of the artist hide caption

toggle caption Courtesy of the artist

All Songs TV

First Watch: Maya Beiser, 'Air'

In a new video, the cellist plays with time and memory, turning back the clock to when she first heard J.S. Bach's music on a scratchy old LP. It remains, she says, a timeless lodestar for her art.

Yuja Wang played a demanding program at Carnegie Hall, topped by four encores. Ebru Yildiz/for NPR hide caption

toggle caption Ebru Yildiz/for NPR

Carnegie Hall Live

Yuja Wang Plays Carnegie Hall

WQXR radio

Hear one of today's most charismatic pianists perform music with deep psychological — and physical — dimensions by Beethoven, Schumann and Brahms.

Yuja Wang Plays Carnegie Hall

Audio is no longer available

Conductor Mariss Jansons led the Bavarian Radio Symphony Orchestra at Carnegie Hall Wednesday in Shostakovich's Symphony No. 7, "Leningrad." AJ Wilhelm for NPR hide caption

toggle caption AJ Wilhelm for NPR

Carnegie Hall Live

The 'Leningrad' Symphony At Carnegie Hall

WQXR radio

Dmitri Shostakovich's powerful Seventh Symphony was written during the devastating World War II siege of Leningrad. Hear Mariss Jansons lead the Bavarian Radio Symphony Orchestra.

The 'Leningrad' Symphony At Carnegie Hall

  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/474662768/475125195" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
Back To Top