Music

Dinowalrus: 'Phone Home From The Edge'

If you like wistful tales of growing old, synchronized dancing, and the magical surrealism that could only come from a band named Dinowalrus, check out the group's latest video for the song "Phone Home From The Edge."

Dinowalrus is a Brooklyn-based trio whose previous debut record, % (yes, it's called a percent sign), was a sometimes challenging, angular set of arty synth-rock songs. The band's latest album, Best Behavior, is a slightly more restrained production, but no less surprising in its mix of dance beats and dreamy, psychedelic soundscapes.

For this video and song from Best Behavior, director Charlotte Kaufmann says they wanted to tell a story based loosely on Rip Van Winkle.

"A young man awakes from an extended slumber to find that years have passed and his hair has whitened. As he passes through his home, he is haunted by the mysterious specters of his past life. Perhaps the video is also, simply, an approximation of a mid-life crisis experienced on acid (something about which, as a 24 year-old I'm well versed). Either way it was inspired by the layered and psychedelic sound of Dinowalrus' 'Phone Home,' which somehow evokes the effect of memories rushing back."

Dinowalrus frontman Peter Feigenbaum says the song was pivotal for the band, but initially had a more elusive story.

"We wrote it a long time ago, but it was the first song to really represent the direction we wanted to take the songs for our second album: A combination of slow-groovey dance-breakbeats, spacey sampler textures, melodic dubby basslines and iconic, hi-register guitar themes. It also uses a strange alternate drone tuning on the guitar.

"Whether the song is about ET, U2, or the waterfront condo-ization of Williamsburg is still up in the air. Lyrically it doesn't have much of a narrative arc, so I'm glad Charlotte invented one in which I fall into a Rip Van Winkle style slumber and wake up to find that I've turned into [actor] Lloyd Kaufman. There's a line about 'the roof you designed, will never hold up in the weather,' so I'm glad we incorporated the good ol' rooftop finale into the script."

Best Behavior is out March 6 on Old Flame records.

[+] read more[-] less

More From Music

Marian McPartland and Eddie Gomez in 1993. R.J. Capak/Piano Jazz Archives hide caption

toggle caption R.J. Capak/Piano Jazz Archives

Marian McPartland's Piano Jazz

Eddie Gomez On Piano Jazz

The Grammy-winning bassist's sense of swing shines through on this session with Marian McPartland, who joins in on "My Foolish Heart" and "All Of You."

Eddie Gomez On Piano Jazz

  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/533993916/533995152" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Holly Macve performs a Tiny Desk Concert on May 5, 2017. (Claire Harbage/NPR) Claire Harbage/NPR hide caption

toggle caption Claire Harbage/NPR

Tiny Desk

Holly Macve

Backed by a suitably low-key band, Macve would sound subtly radiant just about anywhere, from your nearest country bar to the most dreamily lit stage in Twin Peaks.

Kevin Morby performing "Crybaby" live in the studio at KCRW. Davis Bell/Winter LaMaster Photography hide caption

toggle caption Davis Bell/Winter LaMaster Photography

Favorite Sessions

Watch Kevin Morby Perform 'Crybaby' Live In The Studio

KCRW

Watch the former Woods bassist and current frontman of The Babies perform a song off his new solo album, City Music, in a live studio session for KCRW.

Joshua Redman on saxophone, Scott Colley on bass, Brian Blade on drums and Ron Miles on cornet perform at Jazz at Lincoln Center. Lawrence Sumulong/Jazz at Lincoln Center hide caption

toggle caption Lawrence Sumulong/Jazz at Lincoln Center

Jazz Night In America: Video Episodes And Shorts

Still Dreaming: Joshua Redman's Tribute To A Tribute

WBGO and Jazz At Lincoln Center

The saxophonist opens up about the legacy of his father, Dewey Redman, and performs with Still Dreaming — his own nod to the quartet his dad once helped convene as an homage to Ornette Coleman.

Manchester Orchestra Mike Dempsey/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

toggle caption Mike Dempsey/Courtesy of the artist

All Songs TV

First Watch: Manchester Orchestra 'The Alien'

Manchester Orchestra's new album reveals a cinematic approach to songwriting, perfectly displayed in this reverse-slow-motion video for 'The Alien.'

Jen Cloher. Tajette O'Halloran/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

toggle caption Tajette O'Halloran/Courtesy of the artist

All Songs TV

First Watch: Jen Cloher, 'Forgot Myself'

Cloher is a smart, witty Melbourne songwriter whose new song features her wife and record-label partner, Courtney Barnett, on guitar.

Singer-songwriter Michael Cerveris returns to Mountain Stage and his native West Virginia. Brian Blauser/Mountain Stage hide caption

toggle caption Brian Blauser/Mountain Stage

Mountain Stage

Michael Cerveris On Mountain Stage

For this performance, Mountain Stage lured the singer-songwriter away from his Tony Award-winning stint on Broadway and back to the stage in his native West Virginia.

Michael Cerveris on Mountain Stage

  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/533561563/533567684" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Tigers Jaw performs at NPR's Tiny Desk on May 19, 2017. (Raquel Zaldivar/NPR) Raquel Zaldivar/NPR hide caption

toggle caption Raquel Zaldivar/NPR

Tiny Desk

Tigers Jaw

The duo strips down to acoustic guitar and keyboard for a strikingly intimate set, illuminating their close harmonies that tangle like garlands.

Back To Top