Tiny Desk

The Cranberries

The Cranberries: Tiny Desk Concert

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There's got to be some sort of equation to determine the precise moment for which the most possible people feel nostalgic at a given moment — the sweet spot would likely fall somewhere between 15 and 20 years prior to the present. That way, young adults can attach to their early childhood, while those approaching middle age can bask in the glow of their college years. (Hopefully, those in their early 30s have forgotten the worst of junior high.) All of which is a long windup to this immutable truth: When we decided to bring The Cranberries to the NPR Music offices, an absolute honkload of people showed up to watch.

The Irish group's alternately pretty and strident early- to mid-'90s hits ("Linger," "Salvation," "Zombie," et al) have aged well, as have the band members themselves, so now marks a perfect time for The Cranberries to break a lengthy hiatus. Wisely, though, singer Dolores O'Riordan and company aren't turning a blind eye to the past: This five-song Tiny Desk Concert includes early hits "Linger," "Ode to My Family" and "Zombie," and if the band played them out of some sort of grudging sense of obligation, you'd never know it. Naturally, fresh material also popped up on the landscape, as The Cranberries showed off two solid songs ("Tomorrow" and "Raining in My Heart") from a new album called Roses, which comes out next Tuesday.

Thoughts on a Cranberries Tiny Desk Concert will no doubt range from "The Cranberries?" to "The Cranberries!" But wherever you reside on that spectrum, it's worth visiting — and, appropriately enough, revisiting — this charming performance.

Set List:

  • "Linger"
  • "Tomorrow"
  • "Ode To My Family"
  • "Zombie"
  • "Raining In My Heart"

Credits:

Producer: Bob Boilen; Editor: Michael Katzif; Videographers: Michael Katzif and Doriane Raiman; Audio Engineer: Kevin Wait; photos by Kainaz Amaria and Michael Katzif/NPR

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