Jules DeMartino and Katie White are The Ting Tings. Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Courtesy of the artist

Jules DeMartino and Katie White are The Ting Tings.

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Concerts

The Ting Tings In ConcertXPN

The Ting Tings In Concert

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When The Ting Tings' debut album We Started Nothing made waves in 2008, Jules DeMartino and Katie White quickly became reluctant stars. Their quest to record an honest follow-up in East Berlin ended with six scrapped tracks, but a change of scenery in Spain did the trick. Sounds From Nowheresville demonstrates the duo's expansive new palette, but also retains its intuitive grooves, full of synthesizer riffs and revitalized energy.

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WBGO and Jazz At Lincoln Center

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Sampha performs a Tiny Desk Concert on Feb. 7, 2017. (Claire Harbage/NPR) Claire Harbage/NPR hide caption

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