Concerts

Perfume Genius In ConcertWNYC Radio

Perfume Genius In Concert

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Seattle-based singer, songwriter and multi-instrumentalist Mike Hadreas got his start on MySpace and was ultimately discovered by Matador Records, which put out his debut album, Learning, in 2010. Playing songs from both that record and its follow-up, Put Your Back N 2 It, Hadreas was joined by a full-backing band — quite an adjustment, given that he was playing tiny stages just a couple years back.

Here, Hadreas overlays his patient piano chords with vocals as thoughtful as his lyrics, while a full band fills out his frequently melancholic confessions. Performing as part of its world tour with headliner Sigur Ros, Perfume Genius set the stage for the Celebrate Brooklyn evening with its reflective chamber-pop.

Credits

Audio engineers: Ed Haber, Josh Rogosin, Kristin Mueller and Damon Whittemore. Special thanks to Celebrate Brooklyn, BRIC Arts and Bowery Presents.

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