On A Magical Mystery Tour With Hassan Hakmoun When some urban explorers invited the musical adventurers of a Moroccan-inspired band along on a mysterious road trip, we just had to come along. We wound up at an abandoned mine in upstate New York.

Field Recordings

On A Magical Mystery Tour With Hassan Hakmoun

When we plan Field Recordings, we usually look far and wide to find off-the-beaten-path locations for filming musicians. But a unique opportunity presented itself when a duo called Wanderlust Projects — designers of "transgressive placemaking experiences" for urban explorers, usually in abandoned or otherwise off-limits places — invited us to come along on an adventure.

Wanderlust invited a crew of intrepid New Yorkers to accompany the fabulous Moroccan musician Hassan Hakmoun and his band on a mysterious day trip. So we piled into a van with the musicians, and off we all went to points unknown. After a long morning being driven to our secret destination — with no one but the organizers knowing where we were heading — we arrived upstate at the stunning Widow Jane Mine.

Along with providing spectacular visuals, the mine proved to be an oddly fitting location for Hakmoun and his musicians. The Widow Jane is a limestone mine that once supplied cement for such landmarks as the Brooklyn Bridge, the Statue of Liberty and the U.S. Capitol. Hakmoun's music has found its fullest flower in New York with a highly transnational lineup of nomads. Percussionist Chikako Iwahori is originally from Japan; guitarist Raja Kassis hails from Beirut; flutist Bailo Bah comes from Guinea; and drummer Harvey Wirht is from Suriname. Naturally, they all congregated in New York.

At the same time, Hakmoun's music is very much rooted in his homeland. Born in Marrakesh, he is from the Gnawa community, whose ancestors were brought from West Africa to North Africa as slaves in the 15th and 16th centuries. Gnawan music and dance, which are central to their spiritual tradition, fuse Muslim mysticism with sub-Saharan traditions in rituals meant to heal the body and lift the soul. But Hakmoun uses these ancient raw materials to shape something modern and new — just as craftsmen transformed the minerals from the Widow Jane Mine.

SET LIST: "Balili" (My Father)

Credits: Producers: Mito Habe-Evans, Anastasia Tsioulcas; Audio Engineer: Kevin Wait; Videographers: Mito Habe-Evans, Dirby Luongo, Anastasia Tsioulcas, A.J. Wilhelm; Special Thanks: Wanderlust Projects, Mark and Rachel Dibner of the Argus Fund; Executive Producer: Anya Grundmann

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