Field Recordings

Joyce DiDonato Takes A Stand At Stonewall

On June 28, 1969, police raided the Stonewall Inn, a gay bar in New York's Greenwich Village. A riot broke out, sparking successive nights of protest and, many say, the emergence of the modern gay rights movement.

LGBT rights have come a long way since that summer night 46 years ago, when there were still laws criminalizing homosexuality. But mezzo-soprano Joyce DiDonato believes there's still work to be done, so she chose the Stonewall to gather a few friends, talk about equality and sing a centuries-old song that still resonates.

Another reason for the gathering was to remember Mark Carson, a gay man fatally shot in the neighborhood almost two years ago. The city's police commissioner stated Carson's death was clearly a hate crime.

"The idea of a murder happening blocks away from the Stonewall Inn is incomprehensible to me," DiDonato says. "It shouldn't happen anywhere. It tells me that we're not done talking, and we are not done working for people to comprehend what equality is about and why it is important."

DiDonato, 45, straight and a native Kansan, is outspoken on LGBT issues and one of today's most sought-after opera stars. At London's popular Proms concerts she capped off the 2013 festival with "Over the Rainbow," saying it was devoted to LGBT voices silenced by Russia's anti-gay laws. At the Santa Fe Opera, she dedicated a performance to a gay New Mexican teen who took his life after being bullied.

"If there's intolerance and injustice being waged against people, we feel that," DiDonato says. "Because in the end, we're all in this together."

Look closely in the crowd of friends DiDonato pulled in for this video and you'll spot Edie Windsor, the octogenarian who fought the Defense of Marriage Act all the way to the Supreme Court — and won. Another friend is gay playwright Terrence McNally, the Tony Award-winning creator of the Maria Callas play Master Class and the libretto for Jake Heggie's opera Dead Man Walking, which DiDonato has recorded. She credits McNally with showing her the courage to fight for equality.

Then there's the music. DiDonato sings "When I am Laid in Earth" from Henry Purcell's 17th-century opera Dido and Aeneas. Sometimes called "Dido's Lament," the aria unfolds slowly yet purposefully, with a refrain that seems to predict the mournful strains of an African-American spiritual.

Purcell's protagonist pleads for a kind of absolution but also begs not to be forgotten ("Remember me, but ah! forget my fate"). And while DiDonato employs her art to speak about big issues, she says that in the end, it's the people who count — a loud and clear message in Purcell's opera.

"I never want to forget the face and the person," she says, "whether it's Edie Windsor or Terrence McNally or Mark Carson, because that's when it's personal and that's when it matters the most."

MUSIC

"When I am Laid in Earth" (from Purcell's Dido and Aeneas)

PERSONNEL

Students from Juilliard415: Francis Liu and Tatiana Daubek, violins; Bryony Gibson-Cornish, viola; Arnie Tanimoto, viola da gamba; Paul Morton, theorbo

CREDITS

Producers: Mito Habe-Evans, Tom Huizenga, Anastasia Tsioulcas; Audio Engineer: Kevin Wait; Videographers: Mito Habe-Evans, Susan Hale Thomas, A.J. Wilhelm, Anastasia Tsioulcas; Editor: Mito Habe-Evans; Special Thanks: The Stonewall Inn, Mark and Rachel Dibner of the Argus Fund; Executive Producer: Anya Grundmann.

[+] read more[-] less

More From Classical

Penguin Cafe performs a Tiny Desk Concert on May 2, 2017. (Claire Harbage/NPR) Claire Harbage/NPR hide caption

toggle caption Claire Harbage/NPR

Tiny Desk

Penguin Cafe

Penguin Cafe folds in sounds from around the world and throughout music history — Africa, Kraftwerk, Brazil and Franz Schubert.

Composer Anna Thorvaldsdottir revised her piece Aura especially for The Los Angeles Percussion Quartet. David Holechek hide caption

toggle caption David Holechek

All Songs TV

Anna Thorvaldsdottir's Volcanic Transmissions

As members of the Los Angeles Percussion Quartet bow their vibraphones, brush their gongs and message their bass drums, the composer's evocative music oozes from blackness.

Ludovico Einaudi, performing live for KCRW. Larry Hirshowitz/KCRW hide caption

toggle caption Larry Hirshowitz/KCRW

Favorite Sessions

Ludovico Einaudi, 'Petricor' (Live)

KCRW

Watch the pianist and composer, joined by a full band, in a stunning live performance for KCRW.

Opera singer Joyce DiDonato created this video to go with her new album, In War and Peace: Harmony through Music. Warner Classics hide caption

toggle caption Warner Classics

Music

In Chaotic Times, A Singer's Plea For Freedom

Opera star Joyce DiDonato does more than sing — she lends her voice to social causes. Watch her new video, a haunting depiction of a woman trapped in conflict.

Gustavo Dudamel led the Simón Bolívar Symphony Orchestra to open the new season of concerts at Carnegie Hall Thursday, Oct. 6. Chris Lee/Carnegie Hall hide caption

toggle caption Chris Lee/Carnegie Hall

Carnegie Hall Live

Gustavo Dudamel Opens Carnegie Hall Season With 'The Rite Of Spring'

WQXR radio

The charismatic conductor first heard Stravinsky's rambunctious music when he was just 8. Watch him lead the Simón Bolívar Symphony Orchestra of Venezuela live on Thursday night.

A still from Maya Beiser's "Air" video. Courtesy of the artist hide caption

toggle caption Courtesy of the artist

All Songs TV

First Watch: Maya Beiser, 'Air'

In a new video, the cellist plays with time and memory, turning back the clock to when she first heard J.S. Bach's music on a scratchy old LP. It remains, she says, a timeless lodestar for her art.

Yuja Wang played a demanding program at Carnegie Hall, topped by four encores. Ebru Yildiz/for NPR hide caption

toggle caption Ebru Yildiz/for NPR

Carnegie Hall Live

Yuja Wang Plays Carnegie Hall

WQXR radio

Hear one of today's most charismatic pianists perform music with deep psychological — and physical — dimensions by Beethoven, Schumann and Brahms.

Yuja Wang Plays Carnegie Hall

Audio is no longer available

Conductor Mariss Jansons led the Bavarian Radio Symphony Orchestra at Carnegie Hall Wednesday in Shostakovich's Symphony No. 7, "Leningrad." AJ Wilhelm for NPR hide caption

toggle caption AJ Wilhelm for NPR

Carnegie Hall Live

The 'Leningrad' Symphony At Carnegie Hall

WQXR radio

Dmitri Shostakovich's powerful Seventh Symphony was written during the devastating World War II siege of Leningrad. Hear Mariss Jansons lead the Bavarian Radio Symphony Orchestra.

The 'Leningrad' Symphony At Carnegie Hall

  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/474662768/475125195" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
Back To Top