South X Lullabies

South X Lullaby: Jealous Of The Birds

We started a tradition a couple years back where we invite musicians in Austin, Texas, during the SXSW music festival to sing us a lullaby. The performances often take place late at night, or in the wee hours of the morning. We begin this year and week with a whistle from Naomi Hamilton, a singer from Northern Ireland who goes by the name Jealous Of The Birds.

Joined here by backing singer Hannah McConnell, Jealous Of The Birds' "Goji Berry Sunset" is a bedroom pop song with a soft hook — here, she plays it under a soft, glowing light installation. The Amsterdam-based audiovisual design studio Circus Family conceived TRIPH as an immersive experience — as people enter the room, the lights change color, and as people leave, it falls to sleep, perhaps just like a lullaby.

Set List
  • "Goji Berry Sunset"

Watch more South X Lullabies here.

Credits

Producers: Bob Boilen, Mito Habe-Evans; Director/Videographer: Nickolai Hammar; Audio Engineer: Josh Rogosin; Executive Producer: Anya Grundmann.

Support for NPR Music comes from Blue Microphone.

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