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Melissa Morris outside her home in Sterling, Colo. She quit using heroin in 2012, and now relies on the drug Suboxone to stay clean. She's also been helping to find treatment for some of the neighbors she used to sell drugs to. Luke Runyon/Harvest Public Media hide caption

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Luke Runyon/Harvest Public Media

Shots - Health News

Rural Colorado's Opioid Connections Might Hold Clues To Better Treatment

KUNC

Opioid abuse is rising fast among those who live in rural areas. Research suggests the drugs' illicit use there spreads rapidly via social networks, which could be part of the solution, too.

Rural Colorado's Opioid Connections Might Hold Clues To Better Treatment

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Ajit Pai, the senior Republican at the Federal Communications Commission, is slated to be the agency's new chairman. Daniel Acker/Bloomberg/Getty Images hide caption

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Daniel Acker/Bloomberg/Getty Images

The Two-Way - News Blog

Trump's Telecom Chief Is Ajit Pai, Critic Of Net Neutrality Rules

A champion of limited government, Pai has indicated plans to reel back Internet and other regulations. As FCC commissioner since 2012, Pai typically was a reliable opponent of Democrats' proposals.

Artist's rendering of two individuals of Siamogale melilutra, one of them feeding on a freshwater clam. Mauricio Antón/Journla of Systematic Palaeontology hide caption

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Mauricio Antón/Journla of Systematic Palaeontology

The Two-Way - News Blog

Scientists Discover Prehistoric Giant Otter Species In China

Six million years ago, giant otters weighing more than 100 pounds lived among birds and water lilies in the wooded wetlands of China's Yunnan province. The discovery sheds light on how otters evolved.

On the left, President Trump takes the oath of office at the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 20. On the right, protesters attend the Women's March on Washington the next day. Crowd estimates for both events were in the 100,000s but varied considerably. Scott Olson/Getty Images; Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

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Scott Olson/Getty Images; Mario Tama/Getty Images

The Two-Way - News Blog

Politics Aside, Counting Crowds Is Tricky

Claims about the size of crowds for both President Trump's inauguration and the protests that followed the day after are being debated. Scientists struggle with how to do that kind of head count.

Politics Aside, Counting Crowds Is Tricky

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Old World climbing fern on a tree island in the Everglades surrounds LeRoy Rodgers of the South Florida Water Management District. Environmentalists say it's one of the worst invasive species the state has faced in a long time. Amy Green/WMFE hide caption

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Amy Green/WMFE

Environment

Invasive Fern In Florida Threatens To Take Down More Than Just Trees

WMFE

The tenacious Old World climbing fern — native to Africa, Asia and Australia — is toppling trees as it swamps the state. It also threatens to derail a national wildlife refuge.

Invasive Fern In Florida Threatens To Take Down More Than Just Trees

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The village of Volendam, north of Amsterdam, enjoys almost full employment. It overwhelmingly supports the far-right, anti-immigrant politician Geert Wilders, leader of the Dutch Freedom Party. Lauren Frayer for NPR hide caption

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Lauren Frayer for NPR

Parallels - World News

A Prosperous Dutch Village Hopes For A Right-Wing 'Bit Of Revolution'

The Dutch village of Volendam is prosperous, picturesque — and a stronghold of Geert Wilders' far-right Freedom Party. Though it has few immigrants, Wilders' anti-immigrant message resonates.

A Prosperous Dutch Village Hopes For A Right-Wing 'Bit Of Revolution'

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A composite image of Earth taken at 1:07 p.m. ET on January 15 by the GOES-16 satellite. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration hide caption

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National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

The Two-Way - News Blog

'Like High-Definition From The Heavens': NOAA Releases New Images Of Earth

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration released the first public images from its new weather satellite. The agency says the satellite's data will lead to more accurate weather forecasts.

President Trump delivers opening remarks during a meeting with (from left) Wendell Weeks of Corning, Alex Gorsky of Johnson & Johnson, Michael Dell of Dell Technologies and other business leaders in the Roosevelt Room at the White House on Monday. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Politics

Trump Promises Tax Cuts, Less Red Tape — So Long As Businesses Stay In U.S.

The president met with corporate executives on Monday, promising tax cuts and regulatory relief. But he also warned CEOs against moving jobs to other countries.

Imad Abu Shamsiyeh, a Palestinian shoemaker from Hebron, filmed an Israeli soldier shooting a badly wounded Palestinian attacker in the head last year. A military court convicted the soldier of manslaughter. Abu Shamsiyeh says he's gotten death threats for filming the attack. Joanna Kakissis/NPR hide caption

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Joanna Kakissis/NPR

Parallels - World News

In West Bank, Witnesses To Conflict Are Using Video To Document What They See

This week, Israel will sentence a soldier convicted of killing a wounded Palestinian man last year in Hebron. A Palestinian shoemaker recorded a video of the shooting, which was shown at the trial.

In West Bank, Witnesses To Conflict Are Using Video To Document What They See

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Wetlands and marshlands that once protected New Orleans and the surrounding areas from storm surge have been depleted over the years. Here, the $1.1 billion Lake Borgne Surge Barrier outside New Orleans in 2015. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

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Mario Tama/Getty Images

Environment

To Fight Coastal Damage, Louisiana Parishes Pushed To Sue Energy Industry

WWNO - New Orleans Public Radio

Louisiana has a $90 billion plan to fight coastal erosion. Gov. John Bel Edwards says suing oil and gas firms, which have contributed to the damage, will help foot the bill. But he faces obstacles.

To Fight Coastal Damage, Louisiana Parishes Pushed To Sue Energy Industry

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Rep. John Lewis stands in the Civil Rights Room in the Nashville Public Library in Nashville, Tenn. The American Library Association announced Monday that the Georgia Democrat received four prizes Monday for March: Book Three, the last of a graphic trilogy about his civil rights activism and winner last fall of a National Book Award. Mark Humphrey/AP hide caption

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Mark Humphrey/AP

The Two-Way - News Blog

John Lewis' Graphic Memoir Wins 4 American Library Association Awards

March: Book Three, the third installment in the civil rights leader's memoir, won the Coretta Scott King Award for best African-American author. The Caldecott and Newbery medals also were announced.

Ty Segall's new, self-titled album comes out January 27. Kyle Thomas/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Kyle Thomas/Courtesy of the artist

First Listen

First Listen: Ty Segall

The prolific singer, songwriter and bandleader balances confined chaos and riotous pop hooks on his newest self-titled album.

Ty Segall

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  • Buy Featured Music

    Song
    Ty Segall
    Album
    Ty Segall
    Artist
    Ty Segall
    Label
    Drag City Records
    Released
    2017

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Alma Thomas' artwork Resurrection adorns the far wall of the Old Family Dining Room of the White House. Amanda Lucidon/The White House hide caption

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Amanda Lucidon/The White House

Fine Art

How A Work Of Art Makes It Onto The Wall Of The White House

Former First Lady Jacqueline Kennedy once said, "Everything in the White House must have a reason for being there." So we looked behind the scenes to learn how art is chosen for 1600 Pennsylvania Ave.

How A Work Of Art Makes It Onto The Wall Of The White House

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Ohio Governor John Kasich at a White House event in Nov. 2016. in Washington, DC. President Obama hosted the Cavaliers to honor their 2016 NBA championship. Cheriss May/NurPhoto via Getty Images hide caption

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Cheriss May/NurPhoto via Getty Images

Politics

Meet The Republican Governors Who Don't Want To Repeal All Of Obamacare

90.3 WCPN ideastream

Eleven states with Republican governors expanded Medicaid under the Affordable Care Act. Now those governors want to make sure the expansion isn't unwound if the ACA is repealed.

Meet The Republican Governors Who Don't Want To Repeal All Of Obamacare

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Salma Shabaik holds her newborn son, Ali. When he was born, she held him naked against her bare skin, a practice called kangaroo care. Ali is wearing an ear cap to correct a lop ear. Morgan Walker for NPR hide caption

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Morgan Walker for NPR

Shots - Health News

Kangaroo Care Helps Preemies And Full Term Babies, Too

Holding a newborn on a parent's bare chest has long been used to help premature babies. Hospitals increasingly recommend it for full term babies, too. Doctors say it reduces pain and lowers stress.

Kangaroo Care Helps Preemies And Full Term Babies, Too

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