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Flooding in Immokalee, Fla., after Hurricane Irma hit was still present days afterward. Public health officials say that even after waters recede, issues such as mold and mosquitos can remain. Meredith Rizzo/NPR hide caption

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Meredith Rizzo/NPR

Long After The Hurricanes Have Passed, Hard Work — And Hazards — Remain

During Harvey, Irma and Maria, rising floodwaters and high winds raised alarm. But afterward, there are new risks — standing water, mold, mosquitoes, deadly heat. Despair can linger, too.

Acting U.S. Attorney Joon H. Kim speaks during a press conference at the U.S. Attorney's Office, Southern District of New York today. The acting U.S. Attorney announced Federal criminal charges against ten people, including four college basketball coaches, as well as managers, financial advisors, and representatives of a major international sportswear company. Kevin Hagen/Getty Images hide caption

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Kevin Hagen/Getty Images

4 College Basketball Coaches Arrested In Bribery Case; Adidas Exec Also Named

The case exposes the "dark underbelly of college basketball," Acting U.S. Attorney Joon H. Kim of the Southern District of New York said.

Aktham Abulhusn rides the subway on his way to Berlin Alexanderplatz. He came from Syria to Germany in early 2015 on a student visa and now lives there on a refugee visa. Now that his German language skills are improving, he is trying to find a girlfriend. Jacobia Dahm for NPR hide caption

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Jacobia Dahm for NPR

Navigating A New Culture, A Syrian Refugee In Germany Seeks A Dating Coach's Advice

In the final episode of NPR's Rough Translation podcast, Aktham Abulhusn seeks help from a dating coach in Berlin to learn the unwritten rules of German culture. He hopes to find a girlfriend.

Panera's CEO has challenged other fast-food CEOs to eat their kids' menus for a week. He's trying to start a conversation about the nutrition in these meals. Charles Krupa/AP hide caption

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Charles Krupa/AP

More Healthful Kids Meals? Panera CEO Dishes Out A Challenge

Ron Shaich has challenged other fast food CEOs to eat their companies' kids menus for a week. He's trying to start a conversation about the nutrition in these meals.

More Healthful Kids Meals? Panera CEO Dishes Out A Challenge

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Hong Kong action star Michelle Yeoh and Walking Dead alum Sonequa Martin-Green play Philippa Georgiou and Michael Burnham, respectively, in CBS' Star Trek: Discovery. Jan Thijs/CBS hide caption

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Jan Thijs/CBS

'Star Trek: Discovery' Is A Refreshing Triumph

The new CBS series has eye-popping special effects and a classic Trek adventure story that's been updated for today's sci-fi audience.

'Star Trek: Discovery' Is A Refreshing Triumph

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Piper Su, seen here with her son, Elliot, lives in Alexandria, Va. She has registered with several transplant centers in hopes of increasing the odds of getting an organ. Courtesy of Piper Su hide caption

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Courtesy of Piper Su

Searching For A Fairer Way To Distribute Donor Livers

The nation's organ transplant network is considering changing how livers are distributed. The goal is to make the system fairer, but critics worry patients in poorer rural areas could lose out.

Searching For A Fairer Way To Distribute Donor Livers

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From left, Bill Wanlund of the Falls Church electoral board, Jessica Wilson of voting machine company Hart InterCivic and David Bjerke, the Falls Church director of elections test the city's new voting machines ahead of this November's election. Pam Fessler/NPR hide caption

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Pam Fessler/NPR

Learning 2016's Lessons, Virginia Prepares Election Cyberdefenses

One of the most drastic steps was a decision to adopt all new paper-backed voting machines before November after deciding that the paperless electronic equipment was vulnerable to attack.

"All White House personnel have been instructed to use official email to conduct all government related work," Press Secretary Sarah Sanders said after reports emerged of senior Trump administration officials using private email. Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images

White House Reiterates Email Policy After News Of Officials Using Private Accounts

Private email use by public officials was a hot topic in the 2016 presidential race — and one which then-candidate Donald Trump used to accuse rival Hillary Clinton of breaking federal laws.

At Urumqi's Grand Bazaar, a police officer chats with a local vendor while a video promoting China's ethnic minorities plays on a big screen overlooking the square. This was the site of Uighur protests in 2009 that sparked citywide riots, leading to the death of hundreds. Since then, the city has become one of China's most tightly controlled police states. Rob Schmitz/NPR hide caption

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Rob Schmitz/NPR

Wary Of Unrest Among Uighur Minority, China Locks Down Xinjiang Province

Following riots and attacks in past years, residents of Urumqi, the capital of the western region, now live and work under intense surveillance, and are subject to detention after traveling abroad.

Wary Of Unrest Among Uighur Minority, China Locks Down Xinjiang Province

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