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Shots - Health News

Ship That Breast Milk For You? Companies Add Parent-Friendly Perks

Forget paid parental leave. Some companies offer compensation for surrogacy and adoption, or help traveling mothers send breast milk home. The benefits are a relatively cheap way to recruit and retain.

Ship That Breast Milk For You? Companies Add Parent-Friendly Perks
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Crew chief Donny Stewart (far right) throws his air gun back towards the wall at the end of a pit stop at the Firestone Grand Prix of St. Petersburg, Fla. Luis M. Alvarez/AP hide caption

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Sports

Slammed, Hurled and Pummeled: The Life Of A Pit Crew

It takes an IndyCar pit crew about seven seconds to replace four tires and refuel. It's high stakes on race day and a lot can go wrong in the pits. One misstep can cost a race — or worse.

Slammed, Hurled and Pummeled: The Life Of A Pit Crew
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"Danger, Will Robinson!" The danger-sensing abilities of the newly developed robot system far exceed those of the Robot in the classic TV series "Lost in Space." Bettmann/Bettmann Archive hide caption

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The Two-Way - News Blog

AI? More Like Aieeee!! For The First Time, A Robot Can Feel Pain

The German researchers say this will keep robots safer, because "pain is a system that protects us." Added bonus: they say the humans who work alongside them are likely to be safer, too.

The family of Kate Steinle is suing San Francisco and two federal agencies over her killing last year. In this 2015 photo are Brad Steinle, Liz Sullivan and Jim Steinle, her brother, mother and father. Eric Risberg/AP hide caption

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The Two-Way - News Blog

Family of Kate Steinle File Wrongful Death Lawsuit

The suit alleges San Francisco's "sanctuary city" immigration policies led to Steinle's death. It also blames two federal agencies for events leading to her death last year.

People walk past a TV screen showing a poster of Sony Picture's "The Interview" in a news report, at the Seoul Railway Station in Seoul, South Korea. The FBI says North Korea hacked into Sony Pictures computer systems as retribution for the film. Ahn Young-joon/AP hide caption

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The Two-Way - News Blog

North Korea Linked To $81 Million Bangladesh Bank Heist

Experts say code used by hackers in recent attacks on banks appears to be the same as code used in an attack on Sony Pictures which the FBI says was carried out by North Korea.

A roller derby scrimmage in Albuquerque, N.M. Three of the women participating — Lauren Winkler, Leigh Featherstone and Holly Chamberlin — have kept their support of Hillary Clinton quiet. Tamara Keith/NPR hide caption

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Politics

Why Some Clinton Supporters Are Not 'Really Ready To Go Public'

Hillary Clinton doesn't have the biggest rallies. Her bumper stickers and campaign signs aren't particularly visible. It seems her supporters are laying low. Here's why.

Why Some Clinton Supporters Are Not 'Really Ready To Go Public'
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Russia and China were among the 10 countries voting against the press freedom group's application for U.N. credentials. But South Africa indicated on Friday that it would reverse its "no" vote. Anadolu Agency/Getty Images hide caption

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Parallels - World News

U.N. Panel Blocks Accreditation Bid By Committee To Protect Journalists

The Committee to Protect Journalists confronted a "Kafka-esque" process — put off for years, then blocked by countries including China, which it calls the biggest jailer of journalists in the world.

The Hokule'a, a voyaging canoe built to revive the centuries-old tradition of Polynesian exploration, makes its way up the Potomac River in Washington, D.C. Sailed by a crew of 12 who use only celestial navigation and observation of nature, the canoe is two-thirds of the way through a four-year trip around the world. Bryson Hoe/Courtesy of 'Oiwi TV and Polynesian Voyaging Society hide caption

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Code Switch

Hokule'a, The Hawaiian Canoe Traveling The World By A Map Of The Stars

A voyaging canoe built to revive the centuries-old tradition of Hawaiian exploration is circumnavigating the globe. Its crew has already traveled 26,000 miles navigating with the sun, stars and waves.

Hokule'a, The Hawaiian Canoe Traveling The World By A Map Of The Stars
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People gather their belongings Friday as they leave a refugee camp because of an Islamic State offensive near Azaz, Syria. Anadolu Agency/Getty Images hide caption

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The Two-Way - News Blog

Doctors Without Borders Evacuating Key Syrian Hospital Amid ISIS Offensive

ISIS reportedly has seized villages near Syria's border with Turkey, trapping tens of thousands of civilians. The evacuated hospital outside Azaz is the aid group's largest medical facility in Syria.

Obama lays a wreath at the Hiroshima Peace Memorial park cenotaph on Friday. Obama is the first sitting U.S. leader to visit the site that ushered in the age of nuclear conflict. Johannes Eisele/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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The Two-Way - News Blog

Obama Makes Historic Visit To Hiroshima Memorial Peace Park

The memory of the atomic bomb being dropped on Hiroshima "allows us to fight complacency," he said. "It fuels our moral imagination. It allows us to change."

Kikue Takagi, left, narrowly survived the Hiroshima atomic bombing as a schoolgirl. She's now 84. Her second cousin is U.S. Rep. Mark Takano, a Democrat from southern California. His grandparents and parents were all placed in U.S. internment camps in World War II. In this photo from last year, they are at a restaurant in Hiroshima, where he visited her. Courtesy of Mark Takano hide caption

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Parallels - World News

A Survivor's Tale: How Hiroshima Shaped A Japanese-American Family

Kikue Takagi narrowly survived the atomic bomb that killed her classmates. Soon after she moved to California, where she worked for many years at Disneyland. Now in her 80s, she's back in Hiroshima.

Committee Chairman Rep. Jason Chaffetz (R-Utah) listens to testimony during a House Oversight and Government Reform Committee hearing on May 17. Last year, dozens of Secret Service employees improperly accessed files on Chaffetz. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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The Two-Way - News Blog

41 Secret Service Staffers Disciplined For Accessing Private Files On Congressman

The punishment includes, in some cases, suspensions without pay for improperly reviewing records about Utah Rep. Jason Chaffetz. An employee who leaked data to the press has resigned.

In this 2014 photo, prisoners are closely guarded at Chikurubi Maximum Prison in Harare, Zimbabwe. According to state media, at least 200 male inmates were freed from this prison as a result of President Robert Mugabe's pardons. Tsvangirayi Mukwazhi/AP hide caption

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The Two-Way - News Blog

Zimbabwe Pardons Thousands Of Prisoners Because Of Overcrowding, Food Shortages

The move by President Robert Mugabe has reportedly emptied one women's prison of all but two inmates serving life sentences. All juveniles are said to have been pardoned.