Townes van Zandt (left) and Jeff Buckley (right).

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World Cafe Looks Back: Musicians We Miss

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Hospitality: Tiny Desk Concert

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With his growling vocals, Howlin' Wolf fought his way to the top of the cutthroat Chicago blues scene. Frank Driggs Collection hide caption

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Howlin' Wolf: A Blues Legend With An Earthy Sound

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Hear "That's Why God Made The Radio," a new song by The Beach Boys

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Clockwise from upper left: St. Vincent, Laura Burhenn of The Mynabirds, Fiona Apple, Exitmusic. Courtesy of the artists hide caption

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The Mynabirds, St. Vincent, Fiona Apple And More

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British guitarist Bert Weedon died Friday at age 91. Keystone/Hulton Archive/Getty Images hide caption

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Remembering Bert Weedon, Guitar Teacher To Rock Stars (And Many More)

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Todd Snider: 'Stoner Fables' With A Layered Worldview

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Uncle Tupelo at the Sapphire Supper Club in Orlando, Fla. Jeff Tweedy (second from left) went on to form Wilco, while Jay Farrar (second from right) created Son Volt.

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World Cafe Looks Back: Uncle Tupelo's Family Tree

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