Nation

Counting New Yorkers ... And Their Languages

The task of collecting census data is incredibly difficult in New York, a city with a huge multiethnic and multilingual population and a complex housing structure. New York's census response rates have chronically lagged behind the national average. To help it prepare for the 2010 count, New York City has mapped response rates from the 2000 census. Officials have also mapped concentrations of the top five languages spoken in the city.

 

This graphic requires version 8 or higher of the Adobe Flash Player. Get the latest Flash Player. Static versions of some of the maps are displayed below:

2000 Census Response Rates, New York City Census Tracts

[Map]

Spanish Speakers, Ages 5 And Over By Census Tract, New York City, 2000

[Map]

Chinese Speakers, Ages 5 And Over By Census Tract, New York City, 2000

[Map]

Russian Speakers, Ages 5 And Over By Census Tract, New York City, 2000

[Map]

Korean Speakers, Ages 5 And Over By Census Tract, New York City, 2000

[Map]

French Creole Speakers, Ages 5 And Over By Census Tract, New York City, 2000

[Map]

Sources: U.S. Census Bureau, 2000 Census SF3; Population Division, New York City Department of City Planning

Related Content

Census: The Hard Task Of Counting New Yorkers

NYC census response rates have trailed the national average, but officials are promoting it early. (June 4, 2009)

2010 Census Stirs Debate In Washington

Newt Gingrich talks with NPR's Jacki Lyden about what the census means for the Republican Party. (April 19, 2009)



   
   
   
null