NPR Online
Election 2000
Southern States

Check out NPR Online's compilation of election and political stories, by state.

Electoral Votes By State
Alabama - 9 | Arkansas - 6 | Florida - 25 | Georgia - 13 | Kentucky - 8 | Louisiana - 9 | Mississippi - 7 | North Carolina - 14 | Oklahoma - 8 | South Carolina - 8 | Tennessee - 11 | Texas - 32 | Virginia - 13 | West Virginia - 5


 Alabama       Electoral Votes: 9 -- Bush
House

Selma Mayor (14.4 | 28.8)
All Things Considered, March 14, 2000
Joe Smitherman is running for his 10th consecutive term as mayor of Selma, Alabama. He has been mayor since 1965. Smitherman once referred to Martin Luther King in very unflattering terms and was an unabashed racist. He says he has reformed. NPR's Debbie Elliott has a profile of this southern leader from another era.


 Arkansas       Electoral Votes: 6 -- Bush
House

Voters in Arkansas (14.4 | 28.8)
Morning Edition, November 1, 2000

NPR's Alex Chadwick recently talked with voters at the Arkansas State Fair about the presidential election. The conversations that result reveal the width and breadth of the American electorate. Chadwick's report is part of a larger PBS NPR election special called Time to Choose: A Voter's Guide. The program airs tonight on select PBS and NPR stations.

Votes in Arkansas (14.4 | 28.8)
All Things Considered, October 27, 2000

NPR's Wade Goodwyn reports on how the presidential race is playing out in Arkansas, a key state in this election. Like most southern states, Arkansas has voted increasingly Republican, but in order for George W. Bush to win the state, he'll have to appeal to the suburban women around Little Rock, African-Americans, and the rural working class.


 Florida       Electoral Votes: 25
Senate | House

Florida Electoral Vote (14.4 | 28.8)
All Things Considered, December 18, 2000

In Florida today twenty-five electoral votes were cast by twenty-five people pledged to George W. Bush. Florida's electors met at the state Senate chamber in Tallahassee... with the president-elect's brother presiding.

Florida Protests (14.4 | 28.8)
All Things Considered, December 13, 2000

The decision of the U-S Supreme Court that ended the recounting of Florida's presidential vote has brought Vice President Al Gore to the brink of conceding the presidential election. But while Washington awaited that speech tonight -- and a victory statement from Texas Governor George W. Bush -- Gore supporters in Tallahassee held a rally to protest what they saw as injustice. The rally was organized by the AFL-CIO and featured Jesse Jackson among other speakers. NPR's David Welna was there and filed this report.

Florida Legislators (14.4 | 28.8)
All Things Considered, December 12, 2000

Linda talks with Florida House Majority Leader Mike Fasano (Republican), then with Florida House Minority Leader Lois Frankel (Democrat), about the debate and vote in the Florida House of Representatives for the slate of electors.

Florida Legislature (14.4 | 28.8)
All Things Considered, December 12, 2000

NPR's David Welna reports from Tallahassee, where the Republican-controlled Florida House of Representatives has approved its own slate of presidential electors. Today was the nominal deadline for states to name its electors, who will vote on the 18th for president. Democrats in the Sunshine State argue that the GOP is attempting to "hijack" the election. But Republicans say that they are going forward to insure that Florida does not lose its say in the Electoral College.

Tallahassee (14.4 | 28.8)
Weekend Edition - Sunday, December 10, 2000

NPR's Mary Anne Akers reports from Tallahassee, Florida, where yesterday hand recounts of disputed ballots were halted, by order of the U.S. Supreme Court.

Tallahassee (14.4 | 28.8)
Weekend Edition - Sunday, December 10, 2000

NPR's Mary Anne Akers reports from Tallahassee, Florida, where yesterday hand recounts of disputed ballots were halted, by order of the U.S. Supreme Court.

Electors (14.4 | 28.8)
Weekend Edition - Saturday, December 9, 2000

NPR's Debbie Elliott reports from Tallahassee that Florida's state legislature has been called into special session to consider appointing a slate of presidential electors. The legislature is controlled by Republicans who appear to favor appointing electors for Governor George W. Bush. Democratic legislators are speaking out against the special session, saying it is not appropriate for the legislature to appoint electors while court-ordered recounts are under way.

Under Votes (14.4 | 28.8)
Weekend Edition - Saturday, December 9, 2000

NPR's Melissa Block reports Florida's Supreme Court ordered the manual recount of the "under votes" -- presidential votes that have not already been counted.

Florida Election Court Rulings (14.4 | 28.8)
All Things Considered, December 8, 2000

The legal team of George W. Bush has promised an appeal to the U.S. Supreme Court of the ruling today by the Florida High Court. The Florida Court, in a divided 4 to 3 ruling, ordered counting of the so-called "undervotes," ballots that did not register a vote for president when run through a counting machine. Robert is joined by David Brooks of the Weekly Standard, and E.J. Dionne, columnist for the Washington Post, for continued coverage of today's court rulings in Florida election cases.

Florida Legislature (14.4 | 28.8)
All Things Considered, December 8, 2000

The Republican-controlled Florida legislature today held a special session to name its own set of electors to the Electoral College, a move that Democrats have decried as intended to ensure George W. Bush wins the state's 25 electoral votes, and thus the national election. The Florida Supreme Court's ruling today sets up the possibility that there will be competing sets of electors, if a final vote tally turns in favor of Al Gore. We hear about today's action in the Florida legislature, and what is expected to happen Monday, when the two houses reconvene, as Robert talks to Ginny Brown-Waite, President Pro-Tempore of the Florida state senate.

Florida Election Court Rulings (14.4 | 28.8)
All Things Considered, December 8, 2000

The Florida Supreme Court today handed a victory to Vice President Al Gore in his challenge to the state's certified election results. The court ruled thousands of ballots that did not register a vote for president when run through a machine must now be counted by hand. The Gore campaign has declared the ruling a "victory for democracy." The Bush campaign called it "disappointing," and promised an appeal to the U.S. Supreme Court. NPR's Melissa Block talks to Noah Adams about the ruling.

Florida Election News Re-cap (14.4 | 28.8)
All Things Considered, December 8, 2000

Robert has a brief overview of the election news from Florida today. The Florida Supreme Court dealt a win to Al Gore in a divided decision, ordering an immediate hand count of thousands of ballots in Miami-Dade County to begin. Democrats suing two other Florida counties to throw out absentee ballots because of irregularities with the applications for those ballots lost those suits in lower Florida courts today, and promised to appeal.

Seminole and Martin Counties (14.4 | 28.8)
All Things Considered, December 8, 2000

In a victory for the Bush legal team, Florida circuit court justices today rejected legal efforts to have thousands of absentee ballots in Seminole and Martin counties thrown out. The plaintiffs had argued that applications for those absentee ballots had been illegally adjusted by Republican party operatives. Justices ruled that any irregularities with the applications did not misrepresent the intentions of the voters themselves.

Vote Counting (14.4 | 28.8)
All Things Considered, December 8, 2000

NPR's Phillip Davis joins Noah Adams from Tallahassee, Florida to discuss how the vote counting ordered by the Florida Supreme Court will now go forward. A hearing is taking place in the Leon County Circuit Court tonight to discuss that question. The Leon County judge, N. Sanders Sauls, who originally ruled against the Gore request for a recount has recused himself, and Judge Terry Lewis is now handling the case.

Election: Florida Court Rulings (14.4 | 28.8)
All Things Considered, December 8, 2000

The Florida Supreme Court ruled today in favor of hand counting so-called "undervotes," ballots that did not register a vote for president when run through counting machines. The divided 4-3 ruling was a victory for Al Gore. Many analysts have said he needed this ruling to keep alive his effort to overturn the certified Florida election results. The ruling was announced today by court spokesman Craig Waters. Former Secretary of State James Baker has vowed to appeal the ruling to the U.S. Supreme Court on behalf of George W. Bush. We hear some of Mr. Baker's remarks, and Noah speaks with NPR's Melissa Block who was at the courthouse today.

Florida Counties (14.4 | 28.8)
Morning Edition, December 8, 2000

NPR's Andy Bowers reports on two separate but similar Florida court cases, either of which could decide the Presidential election. Plantiffs from Seminole and Martin Counties allege that Republicans were illegally allowed to alter absentee ballots request forms. Depending on how the two judges rule, thousands of absentee ballots could be thrown out.

Recount Report (14.4 | 28.8)
Morning Edition, December 8, 2000

NPR's Melissa Block reports from Tallahassee where the Florida State Supreme Court heard arguments yesterday over the disputed hand recount of thousands of ballots. After listening to over an hour of oral arguments yesterday, the Court may release their ruling as early as today.

Martin County (14.4 | 28.8)
All Things Considered, December 7, 2000

While much of the world watched the case in the Florida State Supreme Court today, another trial was coming to a conclusion not far away in downtown Tallahassee. In the Leon County Circuit Courthouse, lawyers argued over the fate of about 10-thousand absentee ballots cast in Martin County. Most of them were cast for George W. Bush. The judge in the case promised a ruling tomorrow. NPR's Phillip Davis reports from Tallahassee.

Florida Supreme Court (14.4 | 28.8)
All Things Considered, December 7, 2000

Robert and Noah bring us excerpts from today's arguments by attorneys for George W. Bush and Al Gore before the Florida Supreme Court, in the Gore contest of the state election results. Gore attorney David Boies argued in favor of hand counting thousands of ballots from Palm Beach and Miami-Dade Counties. Bush attorney Barry Richard argued against such a count. The justices appeared concerned with the limited amount of time left to do any further ballot counting, as well as the question of whether they have any jurisdiction in the case.

Seminole County, Florida (14.4 | 28.8)
All Things Considered, December 7, 2000

Noah Adams talks to NPR's Andy Bowers in Tallahassee about today's court hearing concerning absentee ballots in Seminole County. Democratic voters have filed a lawsuit claiming Republicans illegally tampered with ballot applications from absentee voters. The lawsuit is aimed at getting all of the absentee ballots in question -- and thus George W. Bush's narrow lead in Florida -- thrown out.

Florida Supreme Court (14.4 | 28.8)
All Things Considered, December 7, 2000

The Florida Supreme Court sat in solemn session today to hear the arguments of both presidential campaigns regarding the counting of disputed ballots. Lawyers for Vice President Al Gore and Texas Governor George W. Bush took turns bearing the questions of the seven justices, who now must decide whether this presidential election contest comes to an end or goes on. NPR's Melissa Block reports from Tallahassee.

Seminole County (14.4 | 28.8)
All Things Considered, December 6, 2000

Lawyers for George W. Bush were shuttling back and forth between two trials this morning in Tallahassee, Florida. Lawsuits filed from Seminole and Martin counties were attempting to disallow thousands of absentee ballots cast in those counties, most of them for Bush. The suits allege that Republicans seeking absentee ballots got special help in qualifying for them. NPR's Andy Bowers reports from Tallahassee.

Eleventh Circuit Court of Appeals (14.4 | 28.8)
All Things Considered, December 6, 2000

NPR's Nina Totenberg explains today's ruling from the federal appeals court in Atlanta, rejecting George W. Bush's request to throw out Florida manual recounts. The appeals court upheld a lower court, which said the recounts were conducted properly, so there was no reason to intervene. The recounts were finished before the appeals court ruled.

Florida Supreme Court (14.4 | 28.8)
All Things Considered, December 6, 2000

Host Robert Siegel talks to NPR's Melissa Block, who previews tomorrow's hearing by the Florida Supreme Court on an appeal by Vice President Al Gore to overturn the certification of George W. Bush as the winner of the state's electoral votes. Gore asked the court to set aside the ruling by Leon County Circuit Court Judge N. Sanders Sauls that some 14,000 disputed ballots need not be hand counted.

Court Challenge Continues (14.4 | 28.8)
Morning Edition, December 6, 2000

NPR's Melissa Block reports on the continuing court challenges in Florida. Circuit Courts are hearing cases of disputed absentee ballots in two counties. But it's in the State Supreme Court where the real battle will be fought; the justices hear arguments tomorrow in Al Gore's appeal of a lower court ruling that denied the hand recount of thousands of ballots.

Seminole County (14.4 | 28.8)
All Things Considered, December 5, 2000

While all eyes have been on Al Gore's challenge to the results in Florida's presidential election, other related lawsuits have been making their way through the courts in that state. One arising from Seminole County has the potential to throw out thousands of absentee ballots counted in that county, ballots that were primarily cast for Texas Governor George W. Bush. Today, that case was in a courtroom in the state capital of Tallahassee. NPR's Andy Bowers is there, and talks to Noah Adams about the case.

Florida Supreme Court (14.4 | 28.8)
All Things Considered, December 5, 2000

Vice President Gore today asserted that he remains optimistic as his appeal of a Florida circuit court ruling goes forward. The Florida Supreme Court has agreed to hear the appeal of yesterday's lower court ruling that rejected Gore's call for hand counts of ballots in key counties. The court said it would take written briefs from the lawyers on both sides on Wednesday and hear oral arguments on Thursday. While Florida's top court hears that case, it has also been asked by the U.S. Supreme Court to explain its decision extending a deadline for counties to submit their vote tallies to the state for certification. That decision allowed hand counting to go forward in several Florida counties, counting that cut into the election lead held by Texas Governor George W. Bush. Robert talks to NPR's Melissa Block about the issues before the Florida Supreme Court.

Leon County Circuit Court (14.4 | 28.8)
All Things Considered, December 4, 2000

Al Gore's contest of the Florida election results has failed its first test. After two marathon courtroom sessions over the weekend at the Leon County Circuit Court, Judge N. Sanders Sauls ruled against the Gore request for a hand count of thousands of disputed ballots from Palm Beach and Miami-Dade counties. We hear excerpts of Saul's ruling and NPR's Andy Bowers in Tallahassee talks with Robert Siegel.

Tallahassee Court (14.4 | 28.8)
Weekend Edition - Sunday, December 3, 2000

Liane talks live with NPR's Debbie Elliot from Tallahassee, where today a court hearing continues to determine whether thousands of disputed ballots from two Florida counties will be counted. Lawyers for Vice President Al Gore argued yesterday that the ballots should be counted; lawyers for Texas Governor George W. Bush disagree.

At the Court (14.4 | 28.8)
Weekend All Things Considered, December 3, 2000

Judge N. Sanders Sauls heard a second day of testimony in the debate over whether Presidential ballots from two Florida counties should be re-counted manually. Advisors to Al Gore believe a manual recount will give the Vice-President the votes needed to win Florida's 25 electors, and thus the election. Lawyers representing George W. Bush argued that a re-count would not likely change the outcome. NPR's Debbie Elliott speaks to host Lisa Simeone from Tallahassee.

Florida Legislature (14.4 | 28.8)
Weekend All Things Considered, December 2, 2000

Florida legislators are getting ready to name their own slate of electors, under a law allowing state legislatures to step in when the results of a state's vote are unclear. Host Lisa Simeone talks to Steve Bosquet, Capitol Bureau Chief for the Miami Herald, about the conversations going on this weekend in Florida's Republican-controlled statehouse.

Florida Update (14.4 | 28.8)
Weekend All Things Considered, December 2, 2000

Florida Circuit Court Judge N. Sanders Sauls began today promising a 12-hour hearing and a ruling before the night was out. As of late afternoon, it was clear the hearing would last at least that long, but far less clear that the judge would be ruling tonight. It took the court more than four hours just to deal with opening statements and the first witness for the campaign of Vice President Al Gore. NPR's Brian Naylor reports from Tallahassee.

Leon County Proceedings (14.4 | 28.8)
Weekend Edition - Saturday, December 2, 2000

A circuit court judge in Leon County, Florida is hearing testimony today. Judge Sanders Sauls will hear arguments from lawyers for Vice President Gore and Governor Bush about whether to recount a million ballots from two Florida counties. NPR's Brian Naylor reports.

Florida Courts (14.4 | 28.8)
All Things Considered, December 1, 2000

The political focus of the day is in Washington at the U.S. Supreme Court, but no less important are legal maneuvers in Tallahassee, Florida. Linda Wertheimer talks to NPR's Debbie Elliott, who was in the Florida capital for a hearing before Circuit Judge N. Sanders Sauls today. The judge denied a Gore request for an immediate count of some 14,000 questionable ballots, until evidence can be looked at tomorrow. The Bush camp, meantime, has insisted that if votes are to be counted, then it should not be limited to the 14,000. And for the second day in a row, a Ryder truck is carrying ballots from southern Florida to Tallahassee, this time from Miami-Dade County.

Supreme Court (14.4 | 28.8)
Morning Edition, December 1, 2000

NPR's Debbie Elliott reports from Tallahassee as the nation watches to see what light the Supreme Court may shed upon Florida's Presidential Elections.

Florida Legislature (14.4 | 28.8)
All Things Considered, November 30, 2000

Linda talks with Senator James E. "Jim" King, Jr. the Majority Leader (Republican, 8th District) of the Florida State Senate about the select joint committee's call for a special session of the Florida State Legislature to select presidential electors, "as soon as practicable." If the Republican-dominated legislature names a slate of 25 electors pledged to Bush, it may give Florida Governor Jeb Bush the opportunity to sign off on the measure, which would make his brother the president.

Florida Legislature (14.4 | 28.8)
All Things Considered, November 30, 2000

NPR's Brian Naylor reports from Tallahassee, where a committee of the Florida state legislature voted to authorize a special session that would consider the appointment of presidential electors. The race between Al Gore and George W. Bush remains deadlocked over the results in Florida, with the stalemate threatening to go beyond the December 12th deadline to certify electors. Republicans, who control the Florida legislature, want lawmakers to be in position to name the electors if a presidential winner is still unnamed. But the electors would certainly be Republican electors, and furious Democrats insist that any involvement by the legislature at this stage would be premature.

Election News (14.4 | 28.8)
All Things Considered, November 30, 2000

The ongoing saga of the 2000 presidential election took yet another odd turn today. Hundreds of thousands of ballots cast November seventh in Palm Beach County were loaded on a rental truck for the four hundred mile trip to Tallahassee. What will happen to them there is uncertain, as the state courts are being asked to decide whether those ballots should be recounted. Also today, a committee of the Florida state legislature called for a special session so that legislators can pick a winner of the state's 25 electoral votes. In Washington, more briefs were filed with the U.S. Supreme Court, which will hold its own hearing on the ballot recount issue tomorrow. NPR's Peter Kenyon brings us up to date.

Disputes in Florida (14.4 | 28.8)
Morning Edition, November 30, 2000

Host Bob Edwards talks to NPR's Cokie Roberts about the ongoing legal and political disputes over the results of the Florida Presidential vote and about Al Gore's ability to maintain the support of Democrats in Congress.

Recount Developments (14.4 | 28.8)
Morning Edition, November 30, 2000

NPR's Brian Naylor reports from Tallahassee on the latest developments concerning Florida's vote recounts. A circuit court judge has ordered all the ballots from Miami-Dade and Palm Beach counties brought to him by 5pm tomorrow, but he hasn't said whether they'll be re-counted. Meanwhile, the Republican tate legislature considers whether it should select electors.

Leon County Circuit Court (14.4 | 28.8)
All Things Considered, November 29, 2000

The legal match between lawyers for the two presidential candidates continued today in the Leon County Circuit Court in Tallahassee, Florida. Vice President Gore is challenging the state's certification of Texas Governor George W. Bush as the winner of its crucial Electoral College votes. The next hearing on the issues in that case is scheduled for Saturday, but today both teams of lawyers were in a Leon County courtroom anyway, arguing over how many ballots ought to be brought from South Florida to Tallahassee for safekeeping and possible recounting. The judge sided with Bush attorneys who asked for a larger number of ballots to be brought up to the state capitol, not just the 14-thousand disputed ballots requested by the Gore legal team. NPR's Steve Inskeep has the news from the courthouse.

Florida Legislature (14.4 | 28.8)
All Things Considered, November 29, 2000

Linda talks with Mark Silva, Senior Political Writer for the Miami Herald about the Republican-controlled legislature in Florida and the role it could play in the presidential election. Some supporters of George W. Bush hope the legislature will over-ride the state courts, where Vice President Gore is challenging the certification of the election results.

Election News (14.4 | 28.8)
All Things Considered, November 29, 2000

NPR's Brian Naylor is in Florida, where the state legislature is considering holding a special session whereby they could name presidential electors if the election is still unsettled by December 12. The contest between George W. Bush and Al Gore is still in the courts, with the U.S. Supreme Court ready to hear arguments on Friday.

Tallahassee Decision (14.4 | 28.8)
Morning Edition, November 29, 2000

NPR's Steve Inskeep reports from Tallahassee on yesterday's Florida court decision that could make things more difficult for the Gore camp.

Talhassee Hearing (14.4 | 28.8)
All Things Considered, November 28, 2000

Al Gore again made the case today that the official Florida election results are inaccurate and thousands of ballots were never counted. Later in the day, attorneys for Gore made that case before a judge in a Tallahassee, Florida courtroom. Attorneys for George W. Bush argued against any further counting of ballots. Robert Siegel talks with NPR's Steve Inskeep in Tallahassee about that court hearing.

Election Update (14.4 | 28.8)
All Things Considered, November 28, 2000

NPR's Debbie Elliott reports on the latest skirmishes -- both in the courts and in efforts to sway public opinion -- in the unresolved presidential race between George W. Bush and Al Gore. As he did last night, the Vice President insisted that the appeals process needs to go on because all the votes in Florida have not been counted. But the Bush camp called it "extraordinary" that the Democrats are trying to win in the courts what they couldn't win in the official certified vote tally.

The Legal Battle Continues (14.4 | 28.8)
Morning Edition, November 28, 2000

The legal wrangling continues in Florida-now the State Legislature will meet to determine possible further action. George W. Bush is appealing to the US Supreme Court, and Al Gore is taking his case to a Florida circuit court. NPR's Steve Inskeep reports.

Another Lawsuit (14.4 | 28.8)
Morning Edition, November 28, 2000

NPR's Brian Naylor reports from Seminole County, Florida, on yet another lawsuit that's been filed over the presidential election. Attorney Harry Jacobs says the elections supervisor in Seminole should not have allowed Republican volunteers to correct mistakes on absentee ballot applications. Those ballots would have normally been thrown out. If the ballots are determined to be invalid, George W. Bush could lose his advantage over Al Gore.

Seminole County (14.4 | 28.8)
All Things Considered, November 27, 2000

A challenge to the counting of absentee ballots in Florida's Seminole County has at least the potential to wipe out thousands of votes that have already been included in the state's certified count. Democrats say those absentee ballots were obtained only after Republican volunteers were allowed to complete applications for them, applications that otherwise would not have qualified. Today, that case was relocated from Seminole County to Tallahassee, the state capital. NPR's Brian Naylor reports.

Florida Vote Certification Challenge (14.4 | 28.8)
All Things Considered, November 27, 2000

Linda speaks to NPR's Debbie Elliott who is in Tallahassee covering the lawsuit by the Gore campaign to invalidate the official Florida vote tally which was certified by Florida Secretary of State Katherine Harris yesterday. The Gore camapaign says enough votes have been left uncounted in three Florida counties to make up the 537 vote lead currently held by Texas Governor George W. Bush.

Election Overview (14.4 | 28.8)
All Things Considered, November 27, 2000

Less than a day after Florida's presidential vote was certified, Vice President Al Gore challenged the results in three counties. Gore and other Democrats said they believed there were enough uncounted votes in these counties to change the outcome of the election. But Texas Governor George W. Bush pressed ahead with transition activities, confident the courts would uphold his narrow victory in Florida and thus his expected majority in the Electoral College. NPR's Peter Kenyon reports.

The Effect of Recount (14.4 | 28.8)
Morning Edition, November 27, 2000

NPR's Howard Berkes reports from West Palm Beach on the effect the recount is having on demonstrators.

Bush Wins Florida (14.4 | 28.8)
Morning Edition, November 27, 2000

NPR's Don Gonyea reports on the latest election news. Florida's Secretary of State has declared George W. Bush the winner of the state's 25 electoral votes, but Vice President Al Gore continues to appeal the ruling.

Recount Protests (14.4 | 28.8)
Weekend Edition - Sunday, November 26, 2000

NPR's Mary Ann Akers reports on protests surrounding the vote recounts in Florida. Democrats charge that Republican-backed protesters outside the county building in Miami purposely intimidated recount workers into shutting down their operation.

Florida Vote Certification (14.4 | 28.8)
Weekend Edition - Sunday, November 26, 2000

NPR's Steve Inskeep reports from Tallahassee, Florida, where later today, Florida Secretary of State Katherine Harris is expected to accept the results of hand recounts from two counties, and announce a winner in the Presidential race for Florida. But that won't end the legal wrangling over the state's crucial 25 electoral votes.

Broward County Recount (14.4 | 28.8)
Weekend Edition - Sunday, November 26, 2000

NPR's Wade Goodwyn reports from Broward County, Florida, where the County Canvassing Board finished its manual recount of presidential ballots last night. Vice President Al Gore gained more than 560 votes on George W. Bush -- a significant slice into the Texas Governor's narrow lead.

Tallahasee (14.4 | 28.8)
Weekend All Things Considered, November 26, 2000

NPR's Steve Inskeep reports live from Florida's state capital, where Secretary of State Katherine Harris is expected to certify the state's vote for the 2000 presidential election.

Palm Beach (14.4 | 28.8)
Weekend All Things Considered, November 26, 2000

As the 5 p.m. ET deadline passes for counties to submit their hand recounts to Florida's secretary of state, NPR's Howard Berkes and Wade Goodwyn report from inside and outside the Palm Beach emergency operations center, where the canvassing board continued to count ballots after asking for an extension of the deadline until Monday morning.

Palm Beach (14.4 | 28.8)
Weekend All Things Considered, November 25, 2000

NPR's Howard Berkes reports from Palm Beach County that the three member election canvassing board is planning to count all night to meet tomorrow's five p.m. deadline for certifying the presidential vote.

Florida Voting Machines (14.4 | 28.8)
Weekend Edition - Saturday, November 25, 2000

Scott speaks with NPR's Wade Goodwyn, who describes how some of Florida's older voting machines run into trouble punching multiple ballots, especially butterfly ballots.

Election Protests (14.4 | 28.8)
Weekend Edition - Saturday, November 25, 2000

Scott speaks with NPR's Phillip Davis. who describes the intense protests surrounding the Miami-Dade County canvassing board when it decided to abandon hand recount efforts.

Election Developments (14.4 | 28.8)
Morning Edition, November 24, 2000

NPR's Wade Goodwyn reports from West Palm Beach on the latest developments in the Florida Presidential vote recount. Palm Beach and Broward counties continue with hand recounts today, as they rush to meet the Sunday deadline imposed by Florida's Supreme Court. The Court refused yesterday to order Miami-Dade County to resume its hand recount- a blow to the Gore campaign, which had expected to pick up hundreds of votes in that county.

Florida - Election Update (14.4 | 28.8)
All Things Considered, November 23, 2000

Florida's Supreme Court has rejected a request by the Gore campaign to force Miami-Dade county to recount votes from the November 7th election. Noah talks NPR's Wade Goodwyn about that new development, about the ongoing recount in two other Florida counties, and how things might shape up for the Sunday deadline set by the state's high court for the final vote tally to be made.

Miami - Dade (14.4 | 28.8)
All Things Considered, November 22, 2000

NPR's Phillip Davis reports on the Miami-Dade election board's surprise decision Wednesday to call off a manual recount of presidential ballots. It was a blow to the Gore campaign, which said it would try to reverse the decision. The vote came just hours after the three-member canvassing board voted to hand count only about 10,000 disputed "undervotes" -- the ballots on which no vote was registered by machine. That move brought angry protests from Republicans.

Florida Election Overview (14.4 | 28.8)
All Things Considered, November 22, 2000

NPR's Andy Bowers reports on the latest developments in the deadlocked presidential campaign. Last night's ruling by the Florida Supreme Court that manual recounts could continue was seen as a major boost for Vice President Al Gore's chances to become the 43rd President. But Gore's hopes took a downward turn today when the election canvassers of Miami-Dade County, the state's largest, announced they would abandon its recount because it could not meet the Sunday deadline.

West Palm Beach Scene (14.4 | 28.8)
All Things Considered, November 21, 2000

For the past week, NPR's Eric Westervelt has reported on the Florida recount from the parking lot of the Palm Beach County Emergency Operations Center. The next president of the United State may be determined by what the election canvassing board decides inside the Center. Outside, all kinds of people have wandered by for a look, and Westervelt files an audio notebook on some of the more colorful characters that he's met.

The Decision (14.4 | 28.8)
All Things Considered, November 21, 2000

NPR's Melissa Block at the Florida Supreme Court in Tallahassee talks to Linda about the court's ruling.

The Announcement (14.4 | 28.8)
All Things Considered, November 21, 2000

Craig Waters, Spokesman for the Supreme Court of Florida announces the court's unanimous decision to overturn earlier court rulings that would not allow the hand-counted ballots in three Florida counties to be included in the state's final vote tally. Waters said the court considered the importance of individual votes to be more important than the deadline set by Katherine Harris, the Florida Secretary of State, that all ballots must have been tallied and the totals submitted to the state by Tuesday of last week.

Breaking Election News From Florida (14.4 | 28.8)
All Things Considered, November 21, 2000

The Supreme Court of Florida announces its decision this half hour, to allow the hand-re-counting of ballots to go forward in three Florida counties. Before the announcement, Linda Wertheimer spoke with NPR's Andy Bowers who is in Tallahassee.

Florida Court Discussion (14.4 | 28.8)
Morning Edition, November 21, 2000

Host Bob Edwards talks with Jon Mills, Dean of the University of Florida Law School about the issues before the Florida Supreme Court which may determine the presidency of the United States.

Florida Recap (14.4 | 28.8)
Morning Edition, November 21, 2000

NPR's Andy Bowers recaps the latest vote count in Florida. Al Gore leads in the national popular vote, but whichever candidate wins Florida also wins the Electoral College and the White House.

Florida Court Hearings (14.4 | 28.8)
Morning Edition, November 21, 2000

The issue of manual recounts went before the seven justices of Florida's State Supreme Court yesterday. Lawyers for both George W. Bush and Al Gore made their arguments on whether manual recounts in three counties can be added to the state's certified vote tally. NPR's Melissa Block reports.

The Recount (14.4 | 28.8)
Morning Edition, November 21, 2000

NPR's Peter Kenyon reports on the latest on the recounts in Florida. Florida is expected to decide the election by giving George W. Bush one more than the 270 Electoral Votes needed to win.

Canvassing Board (14.4 | 28.8)
All Things Considered, November 20, 2000

Linda Wertheimer talks with NPR's Peter Kenyon, who will wrap up the presidential recount vote in three Florida counties: Broward, Palm Beach and Miami-Dade. Another development in the story came today in Palm Beach County, when a circuit court judge announced he did not have the jurisdiction to order a revote because of an allegedly confusing ballot.

Court Arguments (14.4 | 28.8)
All Things Considered, November 20, 2000

This afternoon, the Florida Supreme Court began hearing arguments that have the power to determine who will be the next president of the United States. Democratic petitioners argued that the hand recount of votes for president in Broward and Palm Beach Counties should continue and be counted toward the state total. Republican respondents argued just the opposite. NPR's Melissa Block had a front row seat for the proceedings and talks to us about the arguments and atmosphere inside the courtroom.

The Key Counties (14.4 | 28.8)
All Things Considered, November 20, 2000

NPR's Eric Westervelt, Peter Kenyon and Philip Davis talk about the recount going on in three Florida counties. Westervelt is covering Palm Beach County, where today a circuit court judge announced that he did not have the authority to order a "revote" because of the confusing so-called "Butterfly" ballot. As the recount of votes in Palm Beach County has proceeded, it is actually George Bush who has picked up votes. Kenyon is covering Broward County, which is expected to complete its manual recount by today. And Davis is in Miami-Dade, which today has begun to recount its 654,000 presidential ballots.

Florida Supreme Court (14.4 | 28.8)
All Things Considered, November 20, 2000

The Supreme Court of Florida met today to hear arguments about the hand-recount of votes taking place in several counties. The justices quizzed attorneys for Vice President Gore, Texas Governor Bush and others about their positions on whether hand recounts of the ballots should count.

Florida Residents (14.4 | 28.8)
Morning Edition, November 20, 2000

NPR's David Welna reports from Broward County, one of the three Florida counties still recounting their ballots. In the center of this national turmoil, families in the area took a break over the weekend for a game of softball, but the talk inevitably turned to politics.

Battle in Court (14.4 | 28.8)
Morning Edition, November 20, 2000

NPR's Barbara Bradley reports from Tallahassee on Florida's Supreme Court, which will hear arguments today in a case that may determine who wins the Presidential election. Lawyers for George W. Bush and Al Gore will have two hours to make their cases. Bush's lawyers will argue that the original deadline for certifying the vote should be upheld and that manual ballot recounts should not be included. Gore's lawyers will argue that there's a longstanding tradition under Florida law for accepting the results of manual recounts as the will of the voters.

Hearing in Tallahassee (14.4 | 28.8)
Morning Edition, November 20, 2000

With the state Supreme Court hearing arguments from the presidential campaigns, Tallahassee, Florida is in the national spotlight today. Hordes of reporters, protesters, vendors, and on-lookers have descended on the state capital where the course of the election will be decided in the next few days. NPR's Melissa Block reports on the scene at the courthouse.

Battle of the Ballots (14.4 | 28.8)
Morning Edition, November 20, 2000

NPR's Pam Fessler reports from Florida where the state Supreme Court is hearing arguments today on whether or not hand recounts will be included in the official total. George W. Bush is currently leading Al Gore by 930 votes after this weekend's tally of absentee ballots.

Florida Recount (14.4 | 28.8)
Weekend Edition - Sunday, November 19, 2000

NPR's Eric Westervelt reports from West Palm Beach, Florida, where a manual recount of the November 7th vote continues today. On Monday, oral arguments will be heard in Florida state Supreme Court as to whether the hand recounts are valid. Meanwhile, officials in Miami-Dade county said hand tallying could take until early December to be completed.

Legal Update (14.4 | 28.8)
Weekend All Things Considered, November 19, 2000

NPR's Barbara Bradley talks with host Lisa Simeone from Tallahassee. Ahead of Monday's showdown in Florida's Supreme Court, the Bush legal team has filed papers aimed at stopping the hand recount. The Republicans argue that Florida Secretary of State Katherine Harris has authority to certify election results without accepting hand recounts. In response, Democrats say they seek a "generous" standard for deciding what voters really meant.

Counting In Florida (14.4 | 28.8)
Weekend All Things Considered, November 19, 2000

Hand-counting of the presidential ballots continues in Broward and Palm Beach counties, and began Sunday in Miami-Dade. There is still widespread disagreement over how Florida's election rules define a vote for either candidate. Partially-punched ballots are again in the spotlight. NPR's Peter Kenyon reports.

Overview (14.4 | 28.8)
Weekend All Things Considered, November 19, 2000

NPR's Andy Bowers reports on the latest election news from Tallahassee where arguments between both camps are becoming more heated. Bush and Gore deputies appeared on Sunday's TV talk shows to make their cases. On Monday, Florida's Supreme Court will hear arguments about whether the hand-counted Florida ballots must be included in Florida's Presidential tally.

Black Vote (14.4 | 28.8)
Weekend All Things Considered, November 18, 2000

The Justice Department next week plans to review complaints from the NAACP alleging irregularities and intimidation of African American voters in Florida. Many African Americans watching the recount of presidential ballots in that state believe the unspoken issue is race. NPR's Phillip Martin reports.

Florida Supreme Court (14.4 | 28.8)
Weekend All Things Considered, November 18, 2000

It's a quiet day in Tallahassee for politicians and lawyers. State courts are closed, but Florida's Supreme Court is receiving briefs from both candidates on whether hand-counted votes need to be included in the final tally. The big news this weekend is the football game between the University of Florida and Florida State. Host Lisa Simeone speaks with NPR's Melissa Block from Tallahassee.

Broward County Overseas Ballots (14.4 | 28.8)
Weekend All Things Considered, November 18, 2000

Host Lisa Simeone speaks with NPR's Peter Kenyon from Ft. Lauderdale, in Broward County, Florida, where nearly three-quarters of the overseas absentee ballots were excluded from the official count. A manual count is also underway in Broward.

Election Latest (14.4 | 28.8)
Weekend All Things Considered, November 18, 2000

NPR'S Tom Gjelten reports on the latest events in the unfinished presidential election. An initial count of overseas absentee ballots in Florida puts George W. Bush ahead of Al Gore by nearly one thousand votes. But Florida's Secretary of State has been prohibited from certifying the state's vote until the Florida Supreme Court decides if manually re-counted ballots must be included in the final tally. Republicans went on the attack today, alledging fraud in the manual recount.

Palm Beach (14.4 | 28.8)
Weekend Edition - Saturday, November 18, 2000

NPR's Howard Berkes reports on a hearing held Friday to discuss the legality of holding a new election in Palm Beach County. Lawsuits argue that ballots used in the county were confusing and caused Democratic supporters to mistakenly cast their votes for Reform Party candidate Pat Buchanan.

Tallahassee (14.4 | 28.8)
Weekend Edition - Saturday, November 18, 2000

Scott speaks with NPR's Barbara Bradley, who is in Tallahassee, about what can be expected on Monday with the Florida Supreme Court. The court will be hearing arguments from all sides.

Florida Rulings (14.4 | 28.8)
Weekend Edition - Saturday, November 18, 2000

NPR's Andy Bowers reports on the latest rollercoaster of emotions and court rulings in the state of Florida.

Florida Congress (14.4 | 28.8)
All Things Considered, November 17, 2000

The presidential race is not the only closely fought battle in Florida. In that state's 22nd congressional district, 20-year incumbent Clay Shaw leads Democratic challenger Elaine Bloom by just 589 votes after a hand recount in six Miami-Dade precincts. Her requests for hand recounts in Broward and Palm Beach counties were rejected, as was her request for a full recount in Dade. The Florida race joins many other close races around the country, and will lead to the most divided Congress in decades. Phillip Davis reports.

Court Rulings (14.4 | 28.8)
All Things Considered, November 17, 2000

NPR's Melissa Block is in Tallahassee, where the Bush campaign won a potentially significant legal victory early today. A circuit judge reaffirmed the decision of Katherine Harris, Florida's Secretary of State and a Republican, which said Harris could certify the state's vote count tomorrow without having to include the results of hand recounts that are going on in several counties. Then late in the day the Florida Supreme Court delayed any certiification of the election by the Florida Secretary of State. The manual recounts have been going on in predominantly Democratic counties, and the Gore camp hoped that numbers coming out of those counties would put the Vice President over the top in the key battle for Florida's 25 electoral votes. Democrats said they will appeal the ruling in state Supreme Court.

Miami-Dade (14.4 | 28.8)
All Things Considered, November 17, 2000

NPR's Phillip Davis updates Linda Wertheimer on the latest developments in Miami and Dade County where a handcount of 700,000 ballots is taking place.

Palm Beach (14.4 | 28.8)
All Things Considered, November 17, 2000

NPR's Eric Westervelt talks with Linda Wertheimer about what's happening in Palm Beach County, Fla. where a handcount of ballots is proceeding.

Tallahassee (14.4 | 28.8)
All Things Considered, November 17, 2000

NPR's Barbara Bradley tells Linda Wertheimer about the latest decision of the Florida Supreme Court delaying the certification of the Florida vote by the Fla. Secy. of State.

Circuit Arguments (14.4 | 28.8)
All Things Considered, November 16, 2000

Robert talks with NPR's Debbie Elliott who is sitting in a Tallahassee courtroom, waiting for a decision on the legality of hand counts in Palm Beach and Broward counties.

Circuit Court (14.4 | 28.8)
All Things Considered, November 16, 2000

We hear excerpts from the Bush and Gore lawyers' arguments today before Circuit Court Judge Terry Lewis. Gore's lawyers say Florida's Secretary of State didn't lawfully comply with a previous court order. They say she didn't exercise adequate discretion when she rejected the requests by several counties to submit hand tallied votes after the deadline passed. Bush's lawyers say she exercised "enormous care" in making her decision.

Broward (14.4 | 28.8)
All Things Considered, November 16, 2000

Robert talks with NPR's David Welna in Broward County, where the manual recount has stopped for the night. Vice President Al Gore gained 21 votes today in Broward County.

Palm Beach (14.4 | 28.8)
All Things Considered, November 16, 2000

Robert talks with NPR's Howard Berkes about today's news in Palm Beach, Florida. The manual recount has resumed in Palm Beach County. The parking lot where the board is meeting, however, was the site of some action, as protesters both for and against the hand recount converged.

State Supreme Court (14.4 | 28.8)
All Things Considered, November 16, 2000

NPR's Barbara Bradley talks with Robert Siegel about the Florida Supreme Court decision to allow a manual recount of the presidential vote.

Recount Report (14.4 | 28.8)
Morning Edition, November 16, 2000

NPR's Debbie Elliott talks with host Alex Chadwick about this morning's events in Florida. Republicans and Democrats have filed differing lawsuits in state and federal courts.

Fasting Until It's Over (14.4 | 28.8)
Morning Edition, November 16, 2000

Host Alex Chadwick talks with Pam Olsen of Florida Prayer Network, a religious group whose member began fasting in the final weeks of the presidential campaign. They are still fasting, and say they will continue until a winner is chosen.

Still Counting (14.4 | 28.8)
Morning Edition, November 16, 2000

Broward County is ignoring Florida Secretary of State Catherine Harris and is proceeding with a hand count despite her decision not to include the results in the final total. NPR's David Welna reports.

The Florida Battle (14.4 | 28.8)
Morning Edition, November 16, 2000

NPR's Tom Gjelten reports on the latest in the presidential election. Vice president Gore wants a manual, statewide recount in Florida and promises to accept those results. Republicans declined that offer...they feel Governor Bush can take the state and the presidency one the absentee ballots are counted.

Palm Beach County (14.4 | 28.8)
All Things Considered, November 15, 2000

The Palm Beach County Canvassing Board was in turmoil again today. The Board met out in its parking lot at 7 a.m. prepared to begin its manual recount. But the process hit a brick wall as Republicans attempted to unseat one member, and the board decided to wait for a court ruling on whether it may tabulated "dimpled" rather than "punched" ballots. NPR's Adam Hochberg has been in Palm Beach County all week.

Florida Absentee Ballots (14.4 | 28.8)
All Things Considered, November 15, 2000

No one has been keeping track of how many absentee ballots are coming into all the different counties in Florida, so reporters at the St. Petersburg Times decided to do the job themselves. Robert talks to Brian Gilmer, he's one of the reporters. He says some counties have a heavier absentee rate than others and that if the trends of past elections hold up, the Republican candidate will benefit from a large absentee count.

Florida Court (14.4 | 28.8)
All Things Considered, November 15, 2000

NPR Senior News Analyst Daniel Schorr wonders if Florida's Supreme Court is best able to resolve the question of the contested presidential election.

Florida (14.4 | 28.8)
All Things Considered, November 15, 2000

The election of the next U.S. president has largely come down to the question of whether ballots in Florida may be recounted by hand. An official tally yesterday of certified results from across the state showed George W. Bush leading Al Gore by 300 votes. But at least two counties say they may want to revise their tallies after rechecking ballots by hand. NPR's Tom Gjelten reports.

Florida Developments (14.4 | 28.8)
Morning Edition, November 15, 2000

Host Madeleine talks to Brand NPR's Adam Hochberg about the most recent developments in Florida. This morning, Florida's Secretary of State Katherine Harris asked the state's Supreme Court to take over all of the legal challenges to the process of ballot counting.

Battle in Florida (14.4 | 28.8)
Morning Edition, November 15, 2000

Host Madeleine Brand talks with NPR's Debbie Elliott on the continuing legal battles over the Florida election results. With George Bush currently showing a 300 vote lead, both campaigns are bringing in heavyweight legal teams for the possible court challenges. But the Florida Secretary of State is petitioning to have all legal matters turned over to the state's Supreme Court.

Recount Update (14.4 | 28.8)
All Things Considered, November 14, 2000

Robert talks to NPR's David Welna about the state of the recount in the four Florida counties where the Gore campaign has asked for hand counts: Palm Beach, Volusia, Broward, and Miami-Dade.

Votes and Courts (14.4 | 28.8)
All Things Considered, November 14, 2000

Robert talks to NPR's Debbie Elliott who is in Tallahassee, Florida, where she spent the day at the state capitol. She discusses the deadline that passed at 5 o'clock this afternoon for the Florida counties to submit their vote tallies.

Florida Players (14.4 | 28.8)
All Things Considered, November 14, 2000

Linda Wertheimer talks to Mark Silva, a Senior Political Writer for the Miami Herald about Florida officials with an important roll in the legal battles and ballot counting resulting from the Presidential election. They talk about Florida Secretary of State Katherine Harris, and the justices on the Florida Supreme Court.

The Courts (14.4 | 28.8)
All Things Considered, November 14, 2000

Robert talks with NPR's Nina Totenberg about the ruling upholding the 5pm deadline for Florida counties to report their votes, and how it might be interpreted. Both sides say the ruling is in their favor.

The Deadline (14.4 | 28.8)
All Things Considered, November 14, 2000

Florida's state courts took center stage today in the continuing tally of the presidential vote. A judge in Tallahassee said the state could cut off its tallying of votes at 5 p.m. Tuesday, but he also said amended returns filed later should be considered at the discretion of Florida Secretary of State Katherine Harris. The campaign of Texas Governor George W. Bush applauded the upholding of the deadline, while the campaign of Vice President Al Gore said the judge was really telling Harris to respect amended returns that may be filed later. NPR's Tom Gjelten reports.

Continuing Coverage of the Election In Florida (14.4 | 28.8)
All Things Considered, November 14, 2000

All Things Considered's coverage of the Florida vote tally continues. We hear a few of the comments made by Florida Secretary of State Katherine Harris declaring George W. Bush to be ahead of Al Gore in the vote count, and ordering that any counties continuing to count votes explain their actions to her by tomorrow afternoon. We hear some of the response by Gore Campaign Chairman William Daley. And NPR's Debbie Elliott joins host Robert Siegel from Tallahassee, Florida to discuss tonight's developments. We also hear from NPR's Adam Hochberg in Palm Beach County, where a hand count of the vote is scheduled to get started again on Wednesday morning, in spite of the statement by Florida State Secretary Katherine Harris.

Continuing Coverage of the Election In Florida (14.4 | 28.8)
All Things Considered, November 14, 2000

This evening in Tallahassee, Florida, Katherine Harris, the Florida Secretary of State announced that as of the 5pm deadline for counties to report their vote totals to the state, George W. Bush had a 300 vote lead over Al Gore in the presidential race. Harris said counties that are continuing to hand-count their ballots must offer their reasons for the continuing count by 2pm Eastern Time tomorrow. We hear some of Harris' comments. And Robert Siegel and Linda Wertheimer are joined by NPR's Tom Gjelten in Washington and David Welna in Florida to discuss this announcement. We also hear some of comments of Karen Hughes, Communications Director for the Bush campaign, in reaction to the news from Florida.

Recount Controversy (14.4 | 28.8)
Morning Edition, November 14, 2000

NPR's Howard Berkes reports a judge assigned to hear arguments dealing with the vote recount in Palm Beach County had to remove himself from the cases yesterday. The judge has been accused of saying voters who claim they did not understand the ballot there were stupid. The judge denies the charges. Its just another in a growing number of controversies surrounding the recount in Florida, and delaying the official announcement of who will receive the states 25 electoral votes.

Florida Update (14.4 | 28.8)
Morning Edition, November 14, 2000

NPR's David Welna has the latest on the effort to recount the ballots in Florida.

The Recount (14.4 | 28.8)
Morning Edition, November 14, 2000

NPR's Debbie Elliott reports from Tallahassee on Florida's ongoing vote recount. Republicans and Democrats are taking legal action, and voters are standing by to find out if their votes will or will not be counted.

The Big Picture (14.4 | 28.8)
All Things Considered, November 13, 2000

Across the state of Florida, the political chess match that will determine the nation's 43rd president became ever more complicated today. A federal judge in Miami allowed the hand recounts of the presidential ballots to proceed. Hours earlier in Tallahassee, the Florida Secretary of State said the final deadline for the county canvassing boards to certify votes would be tomorrow at 5 p.m. The state Attorney General and a state court will review that decision. NPR's national political correspondent Elizabeth Arnold reports on the high stakes political game.

Palm Beach County (14.4 | 28.8)
All Things Considered, November 13, 2000

Robert talks with NPR's Adam Hochberg about the plans in Palm Beach County, Florida to go forward with a hand recount of the ballots there, starting tomorrow. The county election board voted two to one in favor of a hand recount.

Volusia County, Florida (14.4 | 28.8)
All Things Considered, November 13, 2000

Linda talks to David Byron, Spokesman for Volusia County, Florida. Volusia County has filed suit against the state of Florida, which is threatening to ignore votes cast in counties where the counting is not finished by 5pm tomorrow.

Palm Beach Report (14.4 | 28.8)
Morning Edition, November 13, 2000

NPR's Adam Hochberg reports the latest from Palm Beach. Florida election officials have determined that a recount is necessary, but its not clear how the Republicans request to have a court end the recount will affect the proceedings.

The Legal Recount (14.4 | 28.8)
Morning Edition, November 13, 2000

NPR's David Molpus reports examines the legal wrangling surrounding Florida's vote recount. Both Democrats and Republicans are fighting over the legality and length of the recount, but both points could be moot. The state of Florida has set tomorrow as the deadline for all to be completed. And unless the courts order the state to change its deadline, the process may end before every vote is recounted.

Florida, My Florida (14.4 | 28.8)
Weekend Edition - Sunday, November 12, 2000

Weekend Edition essayist Diane Roberts laments the role that her native state of Florida is playing in the unresolved presidential election.

Election Update (14.4 | 28.8)
Weekend Edition - Sunday, November 12, 2000

NPR's Don Gonyea reports from Palm Beach County, Florida, where early this morning, officials took the extraordinary step of ordering a hand recount of all the presidential ballots cast in the county. The move could add significant numbers of votes to Vice President Al Gore. The candidate who ultimately wins Florida's electoral votes will win the election.

West Palm Beach Vote Count (14.4 | 28.8)
Weekend Edition - Saturday, November 11, 2000

Protests and a hand count of votes requested by the Democrats are the news in West Palm Beach, Florida. NPR's Don Gonyea reports.

Florida Debate (14.4 | 28.8)
Weekend Edition - Saturday, November 11, 2000

David Molpus reports on latest from both sides of the Florida debate. He warns we may be headed for more counting -- both in Florida and beyond.

State of the Fight (14.4 | 28.8)
Weekend All Things Considered, November 11, 2000

NPR's David Molpus reports on the latest developments in Florida's vote re-count. Representatives from the Bush campaign asked federal courts to step in and stop any hand-counting of ballots; Gore representatives called on Republicans to withdraw that request. Two counties are currently re-counting some ballots by hand.

Florida Vote (14.4 | 28.8)
Weekend All Things Considered, November 11, 2000

NPR's Don Gonyea reports from the government center in West Palm Beach, Florida, where officials are re-counting ballots by hand today, for the 2000 Presidential election.

Palm Beach Scene (14.4 | 28.8)
All Things Considered, November 10, 2000

NPR's Adam Hochberg reports from Democratic party headquarters in Palm Beach County, Florida, where voters are coming in to sign affidavits calling for an inquiry into the voting process in the County. Many voters say the ballot was so confusing that they believe that they may have mistakenly cast votes for Patrick Buchanan instead of Al Gore. They say the returns from Palm Beach County should be considered erroneous.

Florida Recount Update (14.4 | 28.8)
All Things Considered, November 10, 2000

NPR's Debbie Elliott reports on the latest news for the Florida presidential recount. The margin of George W. Bush's lead in the state is unofficially down to just 327 votes. But there are still many steps to go before a winner can be certified.

Palm Beach County, Florida (14.4 | 28.8)
All Things Considered, November 10, 2000

Robert talks to Carol Roberts, the a commissioner in Palm Beach County, Florida and a member of the county election canvassing board, about the recount of ballots in her county.

Protest in Palm Beach (14.4 | 28.8)
Morning Edition, November 10, 2000

NPR's Philip Davis reports from West Palm Beach, where Rev. Jesse Jackson addressed the hundreds of angry voters who have taken to the streets to protest for a revote. Jackson says the disqualification of almost 20-thousand votes there might mean people are disenfranchised unfairly.

The Recount (14.4 | 28.8)
Morning Edition, November 10, 2000

NPR's Debbie Elliott reports from Tallahassee with the latest on Florida's ongoing state vote recount. While voters await new official results; demonstrations and sit-ins continue all over the state.

Florida's Power (14.4 | 28.8)
Morning Edition, November 9, 2000

Host Bob Edwards talks live with Susan MacManus, a professor of government and international affairs at the University of Southern Florida. She'll discuss how Florida, once considered a GOP stronghold, became the ultimate battleground.

Florida's Reponse (14.4 | 28.8)
Morning Edition, November 9, 2000

The result of the presidential election has come down to the state of Florida. NPR's Adam Hochberg reports how voters in the state are responding to the scrutiny of the nation.

Florida News (14.4 | 28.8)
All Things Considered, November 8, 2000

NPR's Debbie Elliot reports from Tallahassee that Florida election officials say that a recount of the state's ballots may not be completed until the end of business tomorrow. Out of nearly six million votes cast, Bush leads Gore by a mere 1800 votes. Absentee ballots could determine the outcome and there have also been a rash of complaints over defective ballots in a heavily Democratic section of the state which reported a high number of votes for Pat Buchanan. Under state law, a recount is mandatory when results are this close. Whoever wins Florida is the next president.

Florida Voters (14.4 | 28.8)
All Things Considered, November 8, 2000

Linda talks to Kimberly Houston, who voted for the first time yesterday in Palm Beach County. She says she intended to vote for Al Gore, but the ballot layout was confusing, and she ended up punching a hole for Pat Buchanan. The election official at her precinct would not give her a new ballot. She's distraught over casting a vote for the wrong man.

Florida Voters (14.4 | 28.8)
All Things Considered, November 8, 2000

Linda then chats with Felix Biez, a Bush supporter who has been an active volunteer for the campaign in Florida. He says he's convinced that when the recount is concluded, Bush will be the victor in Florida and the president-elect.

Florida Re-Count (14.4 | 28.8)
Morning Edition, November 8, 2000

NPR's Renee Montagne examines the ramifications of the mandated vote recount in the state of Florida.

Florida's Role (14.4 | 28.8)
Morning Edition, November 8, 2000

NPR's Philip Davis talks about the state of Florida's role in the presidential elections.

Florida Democrats (14.4 | 28.8)
All Things Considered, November 6, 2000

Noah talks with Ida Castro, who is volunteering for the Coordinated Gore Campaign in Orlando, Florida. Castro is working to increase voter turnout among Hispanics in central Florida.

Florida GOP (14.4 | 28.8)
All Things Considered, November 6, 2000

Noah speaks with Margorie Milford, a volunteer with the Bush campaign in Saint Petersburg, Florida, about efforts there to get out the Republican vote.

Bush In Florida (14.4 | 28.8)
Weekend All Things Considered, November 5, 2000

NPR's Steve Inskeep is traveling with Gov. George W. Bush. The Bush team is making the unusual decision to spend an entire 24-hour period campaigning in Florida just ahead of Tuesday's election. They're looking at Florida's 25 electoral votes.

Florida Race (14.4 | 28.8)
All Things Considered, November 1, 2000

Linda talks with Mark Silva, Senior Political Writer for the Miami Herald about the close race between Bush and Gore in the state of Florida. The latest polls are wildly differing, and it's impossible to predict what will happen. Silva says it all depends on whose supporters go to the polls. Also, Silva says there are also close races for two of the state's Congressional seats. He and Linda talk about the race for the Senate seat vacated by Republican Senator Connie Mack, and the tough competition facing incumbent Republican Representative Clay Shaw Junior.

Gore Stump Speech (14.4 | 28.8)
All Things Considered, November 1, 2000

In the final installment of All Things Considered's Wednesday stump speeches we hear a speech by Vice President Al Gore today in Kissimmee, Florida. He talked about his plans to protect and strengthen social security.


 Georgia       Electoral Votes: 13 -- Bush

Senate | House

Gore's Anti-Crime Plan (14.4 | 28.8)
Morning Edition, May 3, 2000
NPR's Anthony Brooks reports from Atlanta on Democratic Presidential candidate Al Gore's proposals for reducing crime, which he outlined in a speech yesterday. Gore's package of measures includes imposing tougher sentences on violent criminals and making drug treatment more readily available to convicted criminals, to help break the cycle of repeat offenses.

Georgia Primary (14.4 | 28.8)
Morning Edition, March 3, 2000
Melinda Penkava reports from Duluth, Georgia, that neither the Republican nor Democratic Presidential candidates have paid much attention to Tuesday's primary election in the Peach State. Georgia's primary, is overshadowed by the ones in California and New York. Yet Georgia voters will select 54 Republican delegates and 92 Democratic delegates.


 Kentucky       Electoral Votes: 8 -- Bush
House

Clinton in Louisville (14.4 | 28.8)
Morning Edition, November 1, 2000

NPR's Pam Fessler reports from Louisville on President Clinton's attempt to rally Democratic voters in tightly contested congressional districts. In Kentucky's 3rd district, state representative Eleanor Jordon is closing in on Republican congresswoman Anne Northup, a popular incumbent.

Kentucky Voters (14.4 | 28.8)
Weekend All Things Considered, October 28, 2000

Host Lisa Simeone visits three cities in the state of Kentucky, one of several swing states in this years election to talks to voters about the Presidential election. She talks with voters in Louisville, Lexington and Campbellsville, Kentucky.

Why They Run (14.4 | 28.8)
All Things Considered, July 3, 2000
NPR's Pam Fessler traveled to Kentucky and met with an assortment of candidates, trying to ascertain why they run for office. Not all of them will be successful, and some know they don't have a chance to win. They explain everything from the joy of giving back to the community, to the grind of campaigning door-to-door, to the often distasteful act of asking for money.


 Louisiana       Electoral Votes: 9 -- Bush
House

No stories on file.

 Mississippi       Electoral Votes: 7 -- Bush
Senate | House

Mississippi State House to Choose Governor (14.4 | 28.8)
Morning Edition, January 4, 2000
Host Bob Edwards talks with Professor Marty Wiseman of Mississippi State University about the history of an unusual Mississippi state constitutional requirement. According to the requirement, if a local candidate receives less than half of the popular vote, the state house gets to choose the governor.


 North Carolina       Electoral Votes: 14 -- Bush
House | Governor

North Carolina Electoral Vote (14.4 | 28.8)
All Things Considered, December 18, 2000
North Carolina's 14 electors gathered in Raleigh at noon to dutifully cast their ballots for George W. Bush. They were subject to some eleventh hour arm-twisting by Al Gore supporters, but to no avail. Bush won 56 percent of the state vote, and state law bars electors from voting for someone other than the person to whom they are pledged. That law was passed after the 1968 election, in which an elector pledged to Richard Nixon voted for George Wallace. Congress will officially count the 538 votes from around the nation on January 5.

NRA Annual Convention (14.4 | 28.8)
Morning Edition, May 19, 2000
NPR's Eric Westervelt reports that the National Rifle Association opens its annual convention today in Charlotte, North Carolina. The nation's largest gun lobby hopes to energize its members for an election season in which gun control is becoming a key issue.

A Face Behind the Criticism (14.4 | 28.8)
Morning Edition, April 28, 2000
NPR's Adam Hochberg reports from Raleigh on North Carolina's new law that requires candidates to appear personally in any television or radio ads that attack their opponents. The law is intended to make election campaigns less negative.

NRA (14.4 | 28.8)
Weekend All Things Considered, May 21, 2000
NPR's Eric Westervelt reports from the annual convention of the National Rifle Association in Charlotte, North Carolina. Tomorrow, the NRA board is expected to confirm Charlton Heston for a third straight term as president. Before a crowd of 5000, Heston vowed today to take on Al Gore, and any measures that further limit the use of firearms.


 Oklahoma       Electoral Votes: 8 -- Bush
House

No stories on file.

 South Carolina       Electoral Votes: 8 -- Bush
House

Bob Jones University (14.4 | 28.8)
Weekend All Things Considered, March 1, 2000
NPR's Adam Hochberg reports on reaction from alumni of Bob Jones University to charges leveled by politicians and the media that the college is racist and anti-Catholic. Former students say the university is being unfairly demonized. Many oppose the school's policy banning inter-racial dating and say they disagree with anti-Catholic writings by a former university president.

South Carolina Wrap-Up
Weekend All Things Considered, February 20, 2000
NPR's Barbara Bradley looks at the ramifications of Texas Governor George W. Bush's win yesterday in the South Carolina primary.

Bush Family Legacy
Weekend All Things Considered,February 20, 2000
Elizabeth Mitchell, author of "W - Revenge of the Bush Dynasty" talks to Jill about Governor George W. Bush's primary win in South Carolina and how his family legacy has influenced his bid for national office.

South Carolina Roundup
February 20, 2000
Special coverage of today's Republican primary in South Carolina, beginning with NPR National Political Correspondent Elizabeth Arnold in Columbia, South Carolina. Jill Kaufman is joined in the studio by NPR Political Editor Ron Elving, Hastings Wyman, publisher of The Southern Political Report, nd Bill Ballenger, editor of "Inside Michigan Politics." Michigan holds its primary election on Tuesday.

South Carolina (14.4 | 28.8)
All Things Considered, February 18, 2000
NPR's Elizabeth Arnold spent the week crisscrossing South Carolina with presidential candidates George W. Bush and John McCain. On the eve of tomorrow's critical primary, Arnold files this report on the candidates, their campaigns and issues.

South Carolina GOP Primary (14.4 | 28.8)
Morning Edition, February 18, 2000
NPR's Elizabeth Arnold reports from Charleston, South Carolina on final campaigning before the Republican Presidential Primary election in South Carolina. After Senator John McCain's victory in New Hampshire, the pressure is on Texas Governor George Bush, who once assumed a victory in South Carolina would be a sure thing.

Republican Campaign (14.4 | 28.8)
Morning Edition, February 17, 2000
NPR's Elizabeth Arnold reports from South Carolina, where despite extensive campaigning, neither of the two major Republican candidates Arizona Senator John McCain and Texas Governor George W. Bush has a significant advantage in the pre-primary polls.

Republican Debate (14.4 | 28.8)
Morning Edition, February 16, 2000
NPR's National Political Correspondent Elizabeth Arnold reports from Columbia, South Carolina on last nights televised Republican debate. The state's primary is only three days away and it's arguably a "must win" for both Texas Governor George W. Bush and Arizona Senator John McCain.

Bush Money Battles (14.4 | 28.8)
All Things Considered, February 16, 2000
NPR's Peter Overby reports on the money battle being waged in the fight for the Republican presidential nomination. With so much at stake in South Carolina, both Texas Governor George W. Bush and Arizona Senator John McCain are waging an all-out fight, both in the trenches and on the airwaves.

Republican Debate (14.4 | 28.8)
All Things Considered, February 16, 2000
We hear some excerpts of last night's debate between the three remaining Republican candidates for President, Arizona Senator John McCain, Texas Governor George W. Bush, and former Ambassador Alan Keyes.

Political Ads (14.4 | 28.8)
All Things Considered, February 15, 2000
In advance of the Republican primary in South Carolina, the state has become a broadcast advertising battleground. The campaigns of John McCain, George W. Bush, and Alan Keyes are competing for the attention of TV watchers and radio listeners.

Bush and McCain in Dead Heat (14.4 | 28.8)
Morning Edition, February 14, 2000
NPR's Adam Hochberg reports on the GOP presidential race on weekend campaigning in South Carolina for the February 19th Republican Presidential Primary election. A poll conducted over the weekend by Newsweek shows George W. Bush and John McCain in a dead heat.

McCain Uses Internet to Raise Funds (14.4 | 28.8)
Morning Edition, February 11, 2000
NPR's Peter Overby reports on John McCain's fundraisers in South Carolina, Washington, D.C., Arizona, and California, all of which are being coordinated via the Internet.

GOP - South Carolina (14.4 | 28.8)
All Things Considered, February 11, 2000
The high stakes in next week's South Carolina presidential primary raised the temperature there this week for Republican rivals George W. Bush and John McCain. Each has accused the other of initiating a negative campaign, and both camps are now questioning the other's integrity. Peter Overby has the story from Charleston, South Carolina.

GOP - South Carolina (14.4 | 28.8)
All Things Considered, February 11, 2000
The high stakes in next week's South Carolina presidential primary raised the temperature there this week for Republican rivals George W. Bush and John McCain. Each has accused the other of initiating a negative campaign, and both camps are now questioning the other's integrity. Peter Overby has the story from Charleston, South Carolina.

Steve Forbes Drops Out (14.4 | 28.8)
Morning Edition, February 10, 2000
Host Renee Montagne talks to NPR National Political Correspondent Elizabeth Arnold about Republican presidential candidate Steve Forbes plans to drop out of the race. Forbes will formally announce his withdrawal today, after finishing a disappointing third place in Tuesday's GOP Primary in Delaware.

South Carolina Primary Power (14.4 | 28.8)
All Things Considered, February 9, 2000
South Carolina's Republican primary is the next battleground state for the Republican presidential contenders. But as Texas Governor George W. Bush and Arizona Senator John McCain wage the campaigns over the air waves, the primary itself is a throwback to another era altogether.

South Carolina (14.4 | 28.8)
All Things Considered, February 9, 2000
Though he didn't campaign in Delaware, Senator John McCain placed a strong second behind Texas Governor George W. Bush. Both candidates are now claiming momentum going into the next primary, a week from Saturday in South Carolina. Linda speaks with Lee Bandy, Chief Political Writer for "The State" newspaper in Columbia, South Carolina.

Republican Campaign Update (14.4 | 28.8)
Morning Edition, February 3, 2000
NPR National Political Correspondent Elizabeth Arnold reports that Senator John McCain and Governor George Bush began campaigning yesterday in South Carolina, which both candidates consider critical to winning the Republican Presidential nomination. South Carolina holds its Republican primary on Feburary 19th.

South Carolina (14.4)
All Things Considered, February 2, 2000
Fresh off his big win in New Hampshire, Arizona Senator John McCain is barnstorming South Carolina today, pledging straight talk to voters and independence from special interests. Will the message work with South Carolina Republicans?. NPR's Adam Hochberg reports from Greenville, South Carolina.

Bush Recovery (14.4 | 28.8)
All Things Considered, February 2, 2000
Linda speaks with NPR's National Political Correspondent Elizabeth Arnold about the differences between yesterday's New Hampshire primary, and the one on February 19th in South Carolina. In his concession speech last night, Texas Governor George W. Bush claimed South Carolina is "Bush Country."

Complaint Filed Against South Carolina's GOP (14.4 | 28.8)
Morning Edition, January 13, 2000
NPR's Joshua Levs reports on a complaint filed with the Justice Department claiming that the South Carolina's Republican party is violating the Voting Rights Act. A group of voters, including a Democratic state representative, say the Republicans are unlawfully leaving some polling sites in majority African-American voting districts closed because the party doesn't want to include black voters in their primaries.

McCain in South Carolina (14.4)
All Things Considered, January 10, 2000
John McCain is giving George W. Bush a run for his money in the first primary state of New Hampshire. But for McCain to win the Republican nomination, he's going to have to win elsewhere.South Carolina, a state that has historically backed the GOP front-runner, is not known for supporting insurgents.


 Tennessee       Electoral Votes: 11 -- Bush
Senate | House

Tennessee Regrets (14.4 | 28.8)
All Things Considered, November 13, 2000

NPR's Mary Ann Akers reports on Al Gore's tough battle in his home state. Though he's a favorite son, many Tennessee voters consider Gore an outsider. Polls show a tight race between the former Tennessee Senator and George W. Bush.

Gore's Home State (14.4 | 28.8)
Morning Edition, October 20, 2000

NPR's Mary Ann Akers reports on Al Gore's tough battle in his home state. Though he's a favorite son, many Tennessee voters consider Gore an outsider. Polls show a tight race between the former Tennessee Senator and George W. Bush.

Bush (14.4 | 28.8)
All Things Considered, October 10, 2000
Republican George W. Bush campaigned in eastern Tennessee today on his way to North Carolina and his second debate with Democratic rival Al Gore. The debate takes place tomorrow night in Winston-Salem. Bush was pleased to visit Tennessee to highlight how close the race looks in Gore's home state. NPR's Peter Kenyon reports.

Reform Party (14.4 | 28.8)
All Things Considered, June 8, 2000
Alix Spiegel reports on divisions in the Reform Party between supporters of Pat Buchanan and long-time party loyalists. Reform party regulars say the "Buchanan Bridgadiers" are gutting the party of its original agenda which was moderate on social issues and tough on free trade and campaign finance reform.

Reform Party Ruckus
All Things Considered, February 13, 2000
In a loud, raucous meeting yesterday, The Reform Party began to implode over the split between the forces of Minnesota governor Jesse Ventura and party founder Ross Perot. NPR's Guy Raz reports.


 Texas       Electoral Votes: 32 -- Bush
Senate | House

Austin Today (14.4 | 28.8)
Weekend All Things Considered, November 19, 2000

Governor Bush jogged Sunday morning and attended a church service while his legal team in Florida prepares for court. People in Austin are growing weary as the fight for the presidency drags into the Thanksgiving holiday. Host Lisa Simeone speaks with NPR's Don Gonyea in Austin.

Fielding Phone Calls In Texas (14.4 | 28.8)
Weekend All Things Considered, November 12, 2000

Both the Bush and Gore campaign staffers are keeping in touch with voters across the country, while the dispute for the presidency continues. NPR's John Burnett takes us behind the scenes in Austin, Texas with Bush supporters.

Rand Study (14.4 | 28.8)
All Things Considered, October 26, 2000

NPR's Richard Gonzales reports on two studies from the Rand Corporation think tank that offer starkly different views of the widely publicized improvements of Texas students on standardized tests. The dueling reports have stirred up the debate over education in the presidential campaign.

The Death Sentence
Morning Edition, June 12, 2000
NPR's Barbara Bradley reports on a recent study of more than 4,500 death sentences which found that in 68 percent of the cases, the sentences had to be reversed because of a critical mistake somewhere in the judicial process.

Bush Popular with Latino Voters
Morning Edition, May 30, 2000
NPR's Wade Goodwyn reports from Laredo, Texas on presidential candidate Texas Governor George W. Bush's popularity with Latino voters back home -- and his attempts to duplicate that success in other states with sizeable Latino populations. Besides Texas, Bush also has considerable support among Hispanic voters in Florida, but he doesn't do as well in California, Arizona, New Mexico, and New York.

The Environment in Politics
Morning Edition, May 9, 2000
NPR's Wade Goodwyn reports on Governor George W. Bush's environmental record in his home state of Texas. Vice President Al Gore said Texas has the worst environmental record in the country. Bush has countered that he has helped to clean up the state he inherited, and that the best way to do that is through voluntary pollution reduction by industry.

Gore Addresses Black Mayors
Weekend Edition Saturday, April 29, 2000
Al Gore spoke last night at conference of black mayors in Dallas. NPR's Anthony Brooks reports.

Bush in Texas
All Things Considered, April 20, 2000
The two major party candidates for president marked the one year anniversary of the Columbine tragedy today by speaking to community meetings in Texas and New Jersey. Texas Governor George W. Bush told a gathering in the town of Temple that character building was the antidote to violence -- not new gun laws. Janet Heimlich reports from Texas.

Wyly Profile
All Things Considered, March 9, 2000
Last week, a Texas billionaire began running television ads that attacked Senator John McCain's environmental record and touted George W. Bush's environmental record. The ads have provided a new focus for the controversy over a campaign finance loophole known as "independent expenditures." From Dallas, NPR's Wade Goodwyn reports.

Bush's Record
All Things Considered, March 3, 2000
Since losing his early momentum to self-proclaimed "reform candidate" John McCain, George W. Bush has pursued the Republican presidential nomination as a "reformer with results." His slogan is based in his record as governor of Texas. NPR's Wade Goodwyn reviewed Bush's first six years in that job and filed a report on what reform means to the man who would be the next president.

George W. Bush
All Things Considered, February 17, 2000
Linda talks with Molly Ivins, a syndicated columnist and co-author with Lou DuBose of, Shrub: The Short but Happy Political Life of George W. Bush. Ivins says Bush is one of the luckiest politicians she has known and that he has considerable political skills. But, she writes, "from the record, it appears he doesn't know much, doesn't do much and doesn't care much about governing."


 Virginia       Electoral Votes: 13 -- Bush
Senate | House

Bush & Education (14.4 | 28.8)
All Things Considered, March 28, 2000
George W. Bush brought his presidential campaign to Northern Virginia today, where he pledged to make education his top priority. Saying America faced "a national emergency," Bush proposed spending $5 billion over 5 years on literacy programs.

Charles Robb (14.4 | 28.8)
All Things Considered, March 20, 2000
NPR's Peter Kenyon reports on this year's U.S. Senate race in Virginia between incumbent Democrat Charles Robb and former Governor George Allen. Robb survived the GOP sweep of 1994 due in part to the controversy surrounding his Republican opponent, Iran-Contra figure Oliver North. But in Allen, he faces a popular figure who is running at a time when the GOP star in Virginia seems to be ascending.

GOP Primaries (14.4 | 28.8)
All Things Considered, February 29, 2000
Texas Governor George W. Bush won a solid victory in Virginia's Republican primary today, slowing the momentum of Arizona Senator John McCain in advance of next week's fifteen-state Super Tuesday. We hear an excerpt of Bush's victory speech, and Noah speaks with NPR's Elizabeth Arnold about the primaries held today in Virginia and Washington State.

Goode Switches (14.4)
All Things Considered, January 24, 2000
Second-term Congressman Virgil Goode announced today he would no longer call himself a Democrat. But he stopped short of switching to the Republican Party, at least for now. For the time being, he said, he would be an independent. Goode represents a portion of his state often called "Southside Virginia," and he has voted more often with the GOP than with the administration of President Clinton. NPR's Brian Naylor reports.

Virginia Primaries (14.4 | 28.8)
Morning Edition, March 1, 2000
NPR's Elizabeth Arnold reports on results from yesterday's primaries in Virginia, North Dakota and Washington state. Texas governor George W. Bush was victorious in all three GOP presidential contests, putting him back in control in the battle for the Republican presidential nomination. In the Democratic race, Vice President Al Gore dealt a devastating blow to former Senator Bill Bradley.

George W. Bush - Christian Conservatives (14.4 | 28.8)
Morning Edition, March 1, 2000
NPR's Peter Kenyon reports from Annandale, in Northern Virginia that Texas Governor George W. Bush's victory over rival, Arizona Senator John McCain, is due largely to the support of Christian conservatives. Voters in that state appeared to have reacted to McCain's hard-hitting speech on Monday, in which he branded two top Christian political figures as "agents of intolerance."

Democrats on the Internet (14.4 | 28.8)
Morning Edition, March 19, 2000
NPR's Brian Naylor reports that Congressional Democrats are paying more attention to their presence on the Internet. Recently they met with Steve Case, chief of America Online at a retreat at Hot Springs, Virginia in an effort to strengthen their web-sites.

Youth Voter Convention
Weekend All Things Considered, March 12, 2000
Polls show that young people are not interested in politics. Only a fraction of them choose to vote. But there are pockets of political activism. NPR's Jackie Yamanaka reports from Lexington, Virginia,

Presidential Primaries
Weekend Edition Sunday, February 27, 2000
Liane Hansen speaks with NPR's National Political Correspondent Elizabeth Arnold about this week's primaries in North Dakota, Virginia and Washington state.


 West Virginia       Electoral Votes: 5 -- Bush
Senate | House

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