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Election 2000

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Supreme Court Features

The U.S. Supreme Court late Tuesday reversed the Florida high court's decision to allow a presidential vote recount. Ruling in favor of Republican George W. Bush's request to halt the recounts and certify his vote in the state, the high court also found there was not enough time to search for a constitutional remedy in the presidential race.

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Oral Arguments - Dec. 11
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Ruling - Dec 4
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Oral Arguments - Dec. 1
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See a photogallery of the protests outside of the courthouse.


NPR Coverage

Questioning the Supreme Court
Morning Edition, December 20, 2000

audio button NPR's Barbara Bradley reports that the ramifications of the United States Supreme Court's decision on the Bush-Gore case may continue into the future. While George W. Bush will become president the Supreme Court might have lost some credibility. Many people are still unsure whether the court did the right thing.

Right On the Law
All Things Considered, December 13, 2000

audio button Commentator Daniel Troy, an Associate Scholar at the American Enterprise Institute, says the U.S. Supreme Court was right in ruling that Florida's recount process violated federal constitutional rights. He says the decision is consistent with past high court rulings that bar states from treating voters in different counties differently.

Judicial Coup
All Things Considered, December 13, 2000

audio button NPR Senior News Analyst Daniel Schorr reacts to last night's Supreme Court ruling -- which he characterizes as a "judicial coup."

Supreme Court Report
Morning Edition, December 13, 2000

audio button Host Bob Edwards talks with NPR's Cokie Roberts about this historic ruling from the US Supreme Court.

Supreme Court Ruling
Morning Edition, December 13, 2000

audio button How to resolve Florida's votes. This presidential election divided voters nationwide, and according to yesterday's ruling, the US Supreme Court was likewise split over how Florida state determined its presidential votes. NPR's Barbara Bradley reports.

U.S. Supreme Court History
All Things Considered, December 12, 2000

audio button Linda talks with Jack Rakove, Professor of History and Political Science at Stanford University, and author of Original Meanings: Politics and Ideas in the Making of the Constitution, about the U.S. Supreme Court's involvement in this year's presidential election, and comparisons to the court's role in American history.

U.S. Supreme Court
All Things Considered, December 12, 2000

audio button The U.S. Supreme Court heard oral arguments yesterday in the case of Bush versus Gore. Attorneys for Texas Governor George W. Bush asked for the counting of Florida's presidential ballots to be halted permanently. Gore is asking that the justices to allow the recount to resume. The number of demonstrators dropped today after the wild scene outside the court yesterday. But, inside, many more journalists than usual are watching developments. Noah talks with NPR's Nina Totenberg about the wait for the U.S. Supreme Court ruling.

Recount Arguments
Morning Edition, December 12, 2000

audio button NPR's Barbara Bradley reports on yesterday's arguments over the Florida recount held before the U.S. Supreme Court yesterday.

Arguments and Analysis Continues
All Things Considered, December 11, 2000

audio button Linda and Noah continue to talk about today's Supreme Court arguments with Robert A. Destro, Dean of the Columbus School of Law at The Catholic University of America and Jeffrey Rosen, Associate Professor of Law at The George Washington University in Washington, D.C., and we hear some more excerpts from today's oral arguments.

Arguments and Analysis
All Things Considered, December 11, 2000

audio button Linda Wertheimer and Noah Adams bring us excerpts of today's oral arguments before the U.S. Supreme Court in the contest of the presidential election results from Florida. For the second time in history, the court has released an audio tape of a session. Today's arguments by attorneys for George W. Bush and Al Gore lasted 90 minutes. We hear the voices of the justices asking questions, and the attorneys' responses. Robert A. Destro, Dean of the Columbus School of Law at The Catholic University of America and Jeffrey Rosen, Associate Professor of Law at The George Washington University in Washington, D.C., provide analysis.

The Scene Outside
All Things Considered, December 11, 2000

audio button As the U.S. Supreme Court held its civil hearing on the election arguments, NPR's Madeleine Brand was outside the court, where the scene was more chaotic. The area was filled with noisy protests on behalf of both George W. Bush and Al Gore. The differing of opinions among the protesters may reflect a similar split among the justices, as well as among the American people.

Courts and Politics
All Things Considered, December 11, 2000

audio button NPR Senior News Analyst Daniel Schorr says if the U.S. Supreme Court splits along partisan lines, it runs the risk of shaking the faith of the American public.

U.S. Supreme Court
All Things Considered, December 11, 2000

audio button NPR's Nina Totenberg reports on today's oral arguments before the U.S. Supreme Court in the case of Bush v. Gore. The Bush side asked the Court to permanently block the Florida vote recount. The Gore side asked for the counting to resume. The justices asked whether they have a role in the case; are there federal legal questions? Or should they stay out of the matter, deferring to the state court's jurisdiction? They also explored whether there should be a standard for counting imperfectly punched ballot cards.

Legal Aftermath
Morning Edition, December 11, 2000

audio button NPR's Nina Totenberg reports on the legal aftermath of this weekend's U.S. Supreme Court ruling to suspend the Florida recount. The court is back in center stage hearing oral arguments over the recount this morning.

The Showdown
Weekend All Things Considered, December 10, 2000

audio button Host Lisa Simeone speaks with NPR's Chief Legal Affairs Correspondent Nina Totenberg about Monday's arguments before the U.S. Supreme Court. The court will hear the Bush campaign's appeal to prevent any more vote counting in Florida.

The End Game
Weekend All Things Considered, December 10, 2000

audio button The Gore camp is all but conceding that the high court could put an end to their contest in a matter of days, while the Bush campaign sees a path to victory no matter what the Supreme Court decides. NPR's Peter Kenyon reports.

Supreme Court Prep
Weekend Edition - Sunday, December 10, 2000

audio button NPR's Steve Inskeep reports from Washington, D.C., where lawyers for the presidential candidates are preparing for oral arguments Monday before the U.S. Supreme Court. The case is moving forward in an atmosphere of increasing bitterness and partisanship.

The Count Stops Here
Weekend All Things Considered, December 9, 2000

audio button This morning, officials met in Jacksonville, Florida, where they began manually counting thousands of so-called "under-counted" ballots where machines detected no vote for president. The counting had been underway for some five hours when it was ordered stopped by the U. S. Supreme Court. NPR's Melissa Block talks to host Lisa Simeone.

What Happened
Weekend All Things Considered, December 9, 2000

audio button Host Lisa Simeone speaks with NPR's Barbara Bradley about the legal issues the U.S. Supreme Court ruled on today when it called a halt to manual counting of Florida ballots. On Monday, the high court will hear the Bush campaign's appeal to prevent any more vote counting.

The Ruling
Morning Edition, December 5, 2000

audio button NPR's legal correspondent Nina Totenberg reports yesterday's United States Supreme Court decision, combined with Florida trial court Judge N. Sander Sauls' ruling, could mean the end of Al Gore's shot at the presidency. Governor Bush is not pushing Gore to concede, but he is very confident of his own victory.

Court Sets Aside Fla. Ruling
All Things Considered, December 4, 2000

audio button NPR's Nina Totenberg talks to Noah about the Supreme Court ruling on the presidential election. The justices set aside the Florida Supreme Court ruling which had allowed a later deadline for the counties to report their vote totals. The high court asked the Florida court to explain whether its ruling was based on statutes or on the Florida constitution. The federal justices would give more deference to a state court interpreting state election law than to a state court relying on a more general right to vote.

Supreme Court
Weekend Edition - Saturday, December 2, 2000

audio button Host Scott Simon talks to NPR's Nina Totenberg about the high court's consideration of the presidential election.

U.S. Supreme Court Arguments
All Things Considered, December 1, 2000

audio button Linda Wertheimer and Robert Siegel bring us excerpts from the 90 minutes of oral arguments made before the Supreme Court of the United States this morning. Attorneys for George W. Bush argued that the Florida Supreme Court was wrong to extend the deadline for Florida counties to submit their election results to the state capital for certification. Attorneys for Gore defended the Florida court's decision, and argued it's an issue that does not belong in federal court.

On the Court Steps
All Things Considered, December 1, 2000

audio button From across the country, Americans gathered on the steps of the U.S. Supreme Court today. Partisans chanted and shouted on behalf of both sides in the presidential election dispute between George W. Bush and Al Gore. Others waited quietly for hours just for the chance to see the court in action as it took up the historic case. NPR's Madeleine Brand was there.

The U.S. Supreme Court and the Election
All Things Considered, December 1, 2000

audio button NPR's Nina Totenberg reports on the oral arguments before the Supreme Court on the presidential election. Most of the questions raised by the justices seemed aimed at understanding what role, if any, they play in reviewing the Florida State Supreme Court's decision. Attorneys Bush argued that the Florida court decision extending the deadline for counties to report vote tallies was unconstitutional. Gore's lawyers said the state supreme court is the final interpreter of state election law and the U.S. Supreme Court should defer to the Florida justices.

Bush, Gore Attorneys Argue Case
Morning Edition, December 1, 2000

audio button NPR's Nina Totenberg reports on the oral arguments before the U.S. Supreme Court.

Election Arguments - The Nitty Gritty
All Things Considered, November 30, 2000

audio button NPR's Nina Totenberg joins All Things Considered host Linda Wertheimer for a discussion about how a big argument before the U.S. Supreme Court works, and what we should listen for as the Bush and Gore campaigns present their positions.

Preview of Oral Arguments
All Things Considered, November 30, 2000

audio button NPR's Barbara Bradley reports on briefs filed Thursday with the Supreme Court in advance of Friday's oral arguments on election questions. The Bush campaign is asking the high court to say that the Florida State Supreme Court was wrong to extend the deadline for counties to report voting results. Such a decision would make it too late for the Gore campaign to contest the results. The Gore campaign is asking for the Court to uphold the state court. But also, in its brief, the Gore campaign is warning that if the Florida legislature plans to select is own delegates to the Electoral College, the Gore camp thinks it has legal grounds to stop them.

Upcoming Arguments
Morning Edition, November 29, 2000

audio button NPR's Barbara Bradley reports on the legal arguments expected to go before the U.S. Supreme Court Friday.

Supreme Court
All Things Considered, November 28, 2000

audio button Bush and Gore filed briefs with the U.S. Supreme Court in Washington. D.C., today. Bush attorneys say the Florida Supreme Court overstepped its authority in extending the deadline for counties to submit their vote totals. Gore attorneys say the high court would overstep its authority to set aside the Florida court's interpretation of state law.

Supreme Court
All Things Considered, November 27, 2000

audio button NPR's Melissa Block reports the U.S. Supreme Court has denied a request to allow television coverage of the historic oral arguments in the George W. Bush campaign's appeal of the Florida Supreme Court decision. The Florida high court mandated that hand-counted ballots be included in the state's vote totals, despite the passing of a deadline.

Bush Appeals
Morning Edition, November 23, 2000

audio button NPR's Larry Abramson reports from Washington, D.C., on the Bush campaign's appeals to the U.S. Supreme Court to overturn the Florida State Supreme Court ruling. Until now, the federal courts have refused to intervene in the Florida election dispute, on the grounds that it's a matter for the State of Florida to decide. Meanwhile, Republicans in the Florida legislature are threatening to get involved.


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