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Housing First

about the series

Housing First is a yearlong special reporting project by a team of NPR News radio and Web journalists. Through extensive coverage on-air and online, Housing First will explore why it's so difficult for Americans with special needs to find good housing -- and how the lack of housing often stymies their efforts to join, and flourish in, the mainstream of society.

The radio coverage, a joint effort of NPR News' Science and National Desks, begins with a five-part series running weekly on All Things Considered starting July 16, 2002. Throughout the following year, NPR radio journalists will build on the initial series with stories exploring many other facets of housing issues.

NPR Online coverage will complement the broadcast stories -- and then go further, helping listeners and Web visitors delve more deeply into the issues. Exclusive Web elements of the Housing First coverage will include in-depth background reports on key interest groups, photos, videos, maps, graphics and artwork, Web-only audio and interviews, and a virtual library of resources and links on related topics.

Contributors to the Housing First project include:
Nils Bruzelius
Cheryl Corley
Steven Drummond
Patricia Edmonds
Gisele Grayson
Ina Jaffe
Reed Karaim
Joe Shapiro
Joanne Silberner
Tovia Smith

Series producers:
Susan Stone
Rebecca Davis
Jane Greenhalgh



Nils Bruzelius
Nils Bruzelius

Nils Bruzelius joined the NPR Science Desk in January 2002 as senior editor for special projects, working with reporters and editors to develop long-term and investigative projects. He came to NPR from The Boston Globe, where he spent much of his 28-year career covering medicine and science. As Health/Science Editor for nearly 13 years, he directed the Globe's coverage of health and medicine, science, environmental issues, and technology. He also helped direct Globe coverage of higher education, consumer issues and local politics. While a reporter, Bruzelius won numerous regional journalism awards, and, as part of a four-member Globe team, won a Pulitzer Prize for special local reporting for a 10-part series on corruption and mismanagement in Boston's public transit system.

In 1992, Bruzelius was selected for the Knight Science Journalism Fellowship at MIT and spent a year studying the history of science, biology, global climate change, and epidemics. Before he started at the Globe in 1973, he worked as a reporter for the Associated Press in Boston. A native of Stockholm, Sweden, he graduated from Amherst College in 1968 with a degree in history.


Cheyrl Corley
Cheryl Corley

Cheryl Corley is the senior reporter of NPR's midwest bureau based in Chicago. Her stories about Chicago and the Midwest air on public radio stations throughout the nation on the network's premier news shows -- Morning Edition and All Things Considered.

Prior to joining NPR in 1995, Corley was the news director of an award-winning team of reporters at Chicago's public radio station WBEZ. Corley was hired at WBEZ in 1984 and later became city hall reporter and assistant news director. She was named news director in 1989. Her coverage of the Harold Washington Administration led her to be honored in Dollars and Sense magazine as one of Chicago's "Up and Coming Black Professional Women." She continues to report on local politics as well as national news and is a frequent panelist on public television's Chicago Week in Review.

Corley has received several awards for her work from the Associated Press, the Public Radio News Directors Association, the Society of Professional Journalists, and a number of other organizations including the Community Media Workshop's "Studs Terkel Award" for excellence in reporting on Chicago's diverse communities and the Chicago Bar Association's "Herman Kogan Award" for reporting on immigration issues.

A Chicago native, Corley earned a bachelor of arts degree in speech and radio/television from Bradley University in Peoria. While in Peoria, she worked as a reporter and news director at WCBU-FM, and as a television director for the NBC affiliate WEEK-TV. During that time, Corley formed a radio cable outlet that featured black music and news.

Corley is a former member and past president of the board of directors of the Community Television Network, an organization that helps inner-city youth learn how to work with and in the growing video industry. She is also a former member of the board of directors of the Illinois News Broadcasters Association, a current member of the Chicago Association for Black Journalists, and a member of Delta Sigma Theta Sorority.


Steven Drummond
Steven Drummond

Steven Drummond is the education and welfare editor for National Public Radio. Since coming to NPR in August, 2000, he has overseen coverage of K-12 and higher education, and national welfare policy, from the national desk. Prior to joining NPR, he spent six years at Education Week, a national newspaper based in Bethesda, Md., most recently as the deputy managing editor. He has been a reporter with the Tampa Tribune and the St. Petersburg Times in Florida, and with the Associated Press in Detroit. He has also written for The Detroit News, the Detroit Free Press, the New York Times, Teacher magazine and many other publications. In the early 1990s, Drummond spent a year as a middle and high school teacher in public schools in suburban Detroit. He holds master's degrees in education and journalism, and a bachelor's degree, from the University of Michigan.



Giselle Grayson
Gisele Grayson

Gisele Grayson is the editorial assistant at the Science Desk, which oversees biomedical science, health and health care reporting for NPR. She supports the staff of the Desk with research, reporting, producing, editing, administrative work, and anything else they toss her way.

Before starting at NPR in May, 2001, Grayson got her masterís from Columbia Universityís School of International and Public Affairs in Science and Technology Policy, focusing on energy options for developing countries. Before graduate school, Grayson spent five years working for The Conference Board on compensation and benefits issues, and two years traveling in Spain and Latin America. Grayson holds her BA in international relations from Wesleyan University.


Ina Jaffe
Ina Jaffe

Ina Jaffe is a correspondent based in NPR's Los Angeles bureau. She can be heard regularly on Morning Edition, All Things Considered, and Weekend Edition.

Jaffe reports frequently on California politics. She has also covered the controversy surrounding the National Endowment for the Arts, gays serving in the military, and for two years focused exclusively on issues related to welfare reform.

Before joining the Los Angeles bureau in 1988, she was the first editor of NPR's Weekend Edition Saturday, which made its debut in 1985. As editor, she shared a Robert F. Kennedy Journalism Award for the NPR report "A State of Emergency," which covered racial conflict in Philadelphia.

Jaffe reported on the riots in Los Angeles following the acquittal of the four police officers accused of beating Rodney King. NPR's coverage of the Los Angeles riots was cited by the Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Awards committee as an example of NPR's news excellence in awarding NPR its 1992 Gold Baton. Jaffe's report on the first night of rioting also received the Clarion Award from Women in Communications.

In 1994, her profile of a Salvadoran refugee, "Eva Mejia and Her Daughters," was awarded honorable mention from American Women in Radio and Television. She also received a Cindy Award and the Unity Award in 1992 for her report on the political and cultural history of Japanese Americans in Hawaii. For her four-part series on caring for aging parents, Jaffe received a 1989 Gabriel Award.


Reed Karaim
Reed Karaim

Reed Karaim, NPR Online's principal reporter on the Housing First project, is a freelance journalist and novelist living in Tucson, Arizona. He writes on a wide variety of subjects, including social welfare issues.

Karaim's articles have appeared in The Washington Post, U.S. News & World Report, Fortune, USA WEEKEND, The Washington Monthly, and many other publications. He began his career at 19 at a weekly newspaper in Casselton, N.D., where he served as the editor, photographer, layout artist and occasional counter clerk. From 1985 to 1993, he worked in the Washington bureau of Knight-Ridder Newspapers where his assignments included covering the homelessness movement of the early 1980s, a group rehabilitation program for drug offenders, and Bill Clinton's 1992 presidential campaign.

In magazine articles, Karaim has written about public housing in Philadelphia, low-income housing assistance programs in the Texas hill country, and the scarcity of affordable housing nationwide. His 1996 cover story for USA WEEKEND magazine, on a federal pilot program for single welfare mothers in Portland, Ore., won a World Hunger Award. As a contributing editor to Preservation magazine, he has written essays exploring the broader issues of community and neighborhood. Karaim's novel, If Men Were Angels, was published by W.W. Norton in 1999 and was a selection in the Barnes & Noble Discover Great Young Writers series.


Joseph P. Shapiro
Joseph P. Shapiro

Joseph Shapiro joined National Public Radio in November of 2001, where he covers health, aging, disability and children and family issues. Before joining NPR, Joe spent 19 years at U.S. News & World Report, where he wrote about health care and medicine, aging and long-term care, disability and chronic illness, children and families, poverty, civil rights and other social policy issues. He also served as the magazineís Rome bureau chief, White House correspondent and congressional reporter.

Shapiro's book, NO PITY: People with Disabilities Forging a New Civil Rights Movement (Random House/Three Rivers Press, 1993, 1994), won awards from several major disability organizations. His journalism has also won numerous awards, including honors from the Society of Professional Journalists for public service, the Casey Journalism Center for Children and Families for coverage of disadvantaged children, Harvard University's Joan Shorenstein Center on the Press, Politics and Public Policy for investigative journalism, the National Easter Seal Society and the Education Press Association.

Shapiro attended the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism and Carleton College. In 1990, he won an Alicia Patterson Foundation fellowship to spend a year exploring disability issues, and more recently, in 1997, he completed a yearlong Kaiser Media Fellow in Health to study long-term care, chronic care and aging issues.


Joanne Silberner
Joanne Silberner

Joanne Silberner is a health policy correspondent for National Public Radio. She covers medicine, health reform, and changes in the health care marketplace.

Silberner has been with NPR since 1992. Prior to that she spent five years covering consumer health and medical research at U.S. News & World Report. In addition she has worked at Science News magazine, Science Digest, and has been published in The Washington Post, Health, USA Today, American Health, Practical Horseman, Encyclopedia Britannica and others.

She was a fellow for a year at the Harvard School of Public Health, and from 1997-1998, she had a Kaiser Family Foundation media fellowship. During that fellowship she chronicled the closing of a state mental hospital. Silberner also had a fellowship to study the survivors of the bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki.

Silberner has won awards for her work from the Society of Professional Journalists, the New York State Mental Health Association, the March of Dimes, Easter Seals, the American Heart Association, and others. Her work has also earned her a Unity Award and a Clarion Award.

A graduate of Johns Hopkins University, Silberner holds her B.A. in biology. She has a master's degree in journalism from Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism.


Tovia Smith
Tovia Smith

NPR's New England correspondent based in Boston, Tovia Smith has covered breaking news, including the alleged terrorist "shoe-bomber" and the sexual abuse crisis in the Catholic Church. She reports on politics, including the New Hampshire primary, and specializes in in-depth features on a variety of legal and social issues. She has produced award-winning reports on mothers raising their babies in prison, race relations in Boston, and juvenile crime. Her coverage of families and the law includes stories about adoption, custody disputes and same-sex civil unions. She has also filed several documentary-length reports, including an award-winning half-hour special on modern-day orphanages.

Smith has won more than two dozen national journalism awards, including the Casey Medal, the Unity Award, a Robert F. Kennedy Journalism Award Honorable Mention, Ohio State Award, Radio and Television News Directors Association Award, and numerous honors from the Corporation for Public Broadcasting, Public Radio News Directors Association, and the Associated Press.

In 1998, Smith took a leave of absence to launch a daily news magazine produced by public radio station WBUR in Boston. In 1996, Smith worked as a radio consultant and journalism instructor in Ethiopia, Guinea, and Tunisia. She graduated from Tufts University with a degree in international relations.




In the Housing First page border, photos courtesy of Casey Family Programs and National Coalition for the Homeless.





   
   
   
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