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Talk of the Nation discussions on stem cell research



audio buttonSeptember 6, 2001 -- Stem Cell Agreement
Morning Edition Host Bob Edwards talks with NPR's Joe Palca about an agreement reached between the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and a Wisconsin-based research company. This agreement will allow NIH researchers access to embryonic stem cell lines and give the NIH ownership of any discoveries that are made using those lines. (4:00)

audio buttonSeptember 3, 2001 -- Stem Cell Hearing
The Bush administration defended its policy on funding for stem cell research at a Senate hearing this morning. Health and Human Services Secretary Tommy Thompson admitted that fewer than half the stem cell lines approved for federal funding are really ready for research. But he argued that more lines will be ready by the time grants are issued. And Thompson said the two dozen lines that are ready are adequate to get research started. NPR's Joe Palca reports. (5:00)

audio buttonSeptember 3, 2001 -- Making a Blood Cell
NPR's Richard Knox reports that scientists have achieved a milestone in research involving embryonic stem cells. They've succeeded in causing a human stem cell to become a blood cell. The achievement gives credibility to scientists' belief that they can direct stem cells to become any type of cell in the human body. (3:30)

audio buttonSeptember 3, 2001 -- Which Lines Are Useful?
NPR's Richard Knox reports that researchers are trying to figure out which of the 60 or so human stem cell lines approved by President Bush will actually be useful. It isn't yet clear how many of the lines possess the key attribute of stem cells: The ability to develop into any of the hundreds of types of cells in the human body. (4:42)

audio buttonSeptember 1, 2001 -- Silicon Valley's Reaction
The issue of stem cells was one of the topics covered by Wired magazine's John Heilman in Weekend Edition Saturday's "Week in Review" segment. Jim Clark of Netscape has withheld a $60-million gift from Stanford University, as a protest against the Bush administration's policy on stem cell research. Some technology firms fear the Bush administration's policy places an obstacle in their path.

audio buttonSeptember 1, 2001 -- GOP and Stem Cells
NPR's Mara Liasson reports that President Bush's decision on stem cell research has been a delicate -- and largely successful -- political balancing act. Scientists say that the full implications of the decision won't be felt for years. But in the short term, the president has averted several possible legislative challenges to his plan. (4:30)

audio buttonAugust 28, 2001 -- NIH Report
Host Renee Montagne talks with NPR Science Correspondent Richard Knox about a report released by the National Institutes of Health yesterday, listing organizations worldwide that have developed human embryonic stem cell lines. (4:16)

audio buttonAugust 27, 2001 -- NIH Report
The National Institutes of Health has published the names of 10 groups with embryonic stem cells that would qualify for federal funding. President Bush contends that stem cells from these groups are enough to carry out research on whether stem cells can provide cures for a range of diseases. NPR's Richard Knox reports on what's known about these groups and their stem cells. (4:00)

audio buttonAugust 24, 2001 -- Animal Cell Use
NPR's Richard Knox reports that the process used to grow human embryonic stem cells may limit their use in human experiments. The reason is that scientists usually mix the stem cells with mouse cells to help them grow. And that could mean that most of the stem cells now in existence are subject to strict federal regulations limiting the use of animal cells in humans. Find out more about stem cell research. (4:00)

August 13, 2001 --The future of stem cell research
Host John Ydstie talks with NPR's Cokie Roberts about the future of federally funded stem cell research.

August 12, 2001 -- Bush's decision fine by some religious leaders
Duncan Moon reports on the effect of Bush's decision on religious leaders. While the Christian rights is angry, some religious leaders see things Bush's way.

August 11, 2001 -- Reaction to the stem cell decision
NPR's Julie Rover reports on the fallout from President Bush's decision to allow some stem cell research.

August 10, 2001 -- Spinning the stem cell decision
Don Gonyea reports on White House efforts to persuade the public the president made the right call on stem cell research.

August 10, 2001 -- Impact on stem cell research
Joanne Silberner reports for All Things Considered on the impact of the president's decision on scientific research.

August 10, 2001 -- Stem cell oversight
Linda Wertheimer talks with University of Chicago bioethicist Leon Kass, who will head the president's oversight council on federally funded stem cell research.

August 10, 2001 -- Bush's stem cell decision
Joe Palca reports on the president's decision to allow limited federal funding for embryonic stem cell research.

August 10, 2001 -- Reactions to Bush's stem cell decision
Julie Rovner reports on reactions to the president's decision from both sides of the embryonic stem cell debate.

August 10, 2001 -- President's decision made concessions to both sides
Don Gonyea reports on the president's televised address. After months of deliberations, his announcement gave measured victories to both sides.

audio buttonAugust 9, 2001 -- President's stem cell speech
Listen to President Bush's announcement that he will support funding for limited stem cell research.

audio buttonAugust 9, 2001 -- NPR analysis of stem cell decision
Listen to NPR News analysis of the president's decision.

audio buttonAugust 9, 2001 -- President's stem cell speech and NPR news coverage
Listen to coverage of the president's speech and NPR News analysis.

August 9, 2001 -- History of stem cell research
Joe Palca reports on the complicated political history of stem cell research that led to Bush's impending decision. If President Bush decides to allow federal funding, it will be major shift for a government that traditionally stays out of any research involving human embryos.

August 9, 2001 -- Preview of President Bush's speech revealing his decision on embryonic stem cell research
Don Gonyea previews President Bush's speech announcing his decision on embryonic stem cell research. No matter what Bush decides regarding federal funding, the political and ethical debate will continue.

August 9, 2001 -- Catholic voters and the stem cell debate
Mara Liasson reports on the potential ramifications of Bush's stem cell decision on an important group of voters he courted closely -- white, church-going Catholics.

August 7, 2001 -- Early stem cell researchers have more questions than answers
Richard Knox reports on two labs in Boston conducting early stem cell experiments. While scientists are excited about the research so far, they are unsure whether stem cell treatments will live up to the public's expectations.

audio button August 1, 2001 -- Embryonic stem cell debate extends to Germany
Guy Raz reports from Germany on the growing debate over embryonic stem cell research. It is currently banned by a 1949 constitution protecting human embryos from harm, and some German scientists want the laws changed.

audio buttonAugust 1, 2001 -- House bill bans all human cloning
Julie Rovner reports on a House bill banning human cloning for any purpose, including medical research. Scientists fear the bill will have potentially disastrous implications for stem cell research.

audio button July 27, 2001 -- Scientists transplant human neural stem cells into fetal monkeys
Richard Knox reports that researchers successfully transplanted human neural stem cells into the brains of laboratory monkeys still in their mothers’ wombs, opening up the possibility down the road to treat human brain disorders with stem cells.

audio buttonJuly 25, 2001 -- Human embryonic stem cells help paralyzed rats regain some muscle movement
Joe Palca reports on researchers at Johns Hopkins University who partially repaired spinal cord injuries in rats by injecting them with human embryonic stem cells.

audio buttonJuly 23, 2001 -- Pope and President Bush meet in Rome
NPR's Sylvia Poggioli reports on the meeting between the pope and President Bush. She also reports on the public address following the meeting where the pope urged the president to oppose to funding embryonic stem cell research.

audio buttonJuly 23, 2001 -- Pope urges Bush against funding embryonic stem cell research
John Paul II today urged President Bush to oppose federal funding of embryonic stem cell research. Host Bob Edwards talks with NPR's Don Gonyea, who is reporting from Rome.

audio buttonJuly 19, 2001 -- Bush feeling pressure from all sides on stem cell debate
The fight over federal funding for stem cell research is growing increasingly personal and pressure on President Bush is building. NPR's Peter Overby reports for Morning Edition.

audio buttonJuly 18, 2001 -- Frist announces support for federally funded stem cell research
Steve Inskeep reports on surgeon-turned Senator Bill Frist's (R-Tenn.) speech today before the Senate hearing in support of federally funded embryonic stem cell research.

audio buttonJuly 18, 2001 -- Analysis: How might the stem debate affect the abortion debate?
Daniel Schorr discusses how the debate over embryonic stem cell research is changing the ground rules for abortion.

audio buttonJuly 18, 2001 -- NIH report cites advantages of embryonic stem cell research
Joanne Silberner reports on the National Institutes of Health report released today citing important differences between embryonic and adult stem cells.

audio buttonJuly 16, 2001 -- The Stem cell debate: Increased pressure on Bush to make a decision
Julie Rovner reports on the increased political pressure felt by President Bush to decide whether or not to provide federal funding for embryonic stem cell research.

audio buttonJuly 14, 2001 -- Discussion: The ethics of stem cell research
Susan Stamberg hosts a discussion on the ethics of stem cell research.
Guests: Gilbert Mielaender, professor of ethics at Valparaiso University
Alta Charo, professor of law and bioethics at the University of Wisconsin.

audio button July 13, 2001 -- Analysis: The cloning debate and the FDA
Joe Palca reports on a debate that affects the use of cloning to develop stem cells specificially for research. Does the FDA have the authority to regulate cloning?

audio button July 12, 2001 -- Analysis: Using human embryos to supply stem cells
Joe Palca details a Massachusetts biotech company's attempt to create cloned human embryos from which to harvest stem cells.

audio button June 28, 2001 -- Analysis: Embryonic stem cell research a controversial subject
Joe Palca reports on the field of stem cell research. He explains that stem cells are primitive cells with the potential to become heart, nerve, muscle or any other type of cell in the body. Stem cells have the potential to one day treat a number of diseases including diabetes and Parkinson's Disease.

audio button June 21, 2001 -- Interview: Tony Mazzachi and Alta Charo discuss stem cell research
Bob Edwards interviews Tony Mazzachi, a lobbyist for the Association of American Medical Colleges, and Alta Charo, a professor of law and bioethics at the University of Wisconsin, on the debate over embryonic stem cell research.

audio button June 21, 2001 -- Analysis: Abortion opponents broaden debate to include human cloning, stem cell research and other non-abortion topics
Julie Rovner reports on issues beyond Roe versus Wade that have been taken up by the anti-abortion movement including the debate over embryonic stem cell research.

audio button June 8, 2001 -- Commentary: Lauding embryonic stem cell research
Writer Morton Kondracke, author of "Saving Millie: Love, Politics, and Parkinson's Disease", gives his personal views on the need for embryonic stem cell research. Embryonic stem cells have the potential to treat Parkinson's disease, a disease that has struck his wife.

audio button May 2, 2001 -- Analysis: Scientists achieving success in growing brain cells taken from human cadavers, which could lead to nerve cell transplant into living patients
Joe Palca reports scientists have successfully grown brain cells taken from human cadavers. The cells, known as progenitor cells, were able to divide and grow in the laboratory. It is not yet known if these cells will be medically useful, but if they are, they could be an alternative to embryonic stem cells.

audio button April 27, 2001 -- Profile: Debate over embryonic stem cells
Joe Palca reports on two important findings in the stem cell field. Scientists at Advanced Cell Technologies show that mouse embryos produced by cloning can be used to harvest embryonic stem cells. Also, scientists at the National Institutes of Health demonstrate that mouse embryonic stem cells could be used to create insulin-producing cells. If this finding could be extended to human embryonic stem cells, it has the potential to treat juvenile diabetes. Extending both of these findings to humans depends on the continuation of human embryonic stem cell research.

audio button April 10, 2001 -- Interview: Dr Patricia Zuk discusses using stem cells from fat for research
Linda Wertheimer interviews Dr. Patricia Zuk of the University of California School of Medicine about her recent paper on isolating stem cells from fat. She discusses the possibility of avoiding the ethical issues associated with embryonic stem cell research by using stem cells harvested from the fat removed by liposuction.

audio button April 5, 2001 -- Analysis: Extreme treatments for diseases that are not immediately life threatening
Jon Hamilton meets a woman with multiple sclerosis who underwent an experimental stem cell transplant in an attempt to stop the disease from progressing further. She received stem cells from her own immune system, not the embryonic stem cells which are currently being debated.

audio button March 30, 2001 -- Analysis: Two new studies show possibility of stem cells being used to help repair hearts following heart attacks
Richard Harris reports on a study by scientists at New York Medical College that showed that stem cells found in bone marrow of adult mice could be used to repair heart damage in mice.

audio button February 27, 2001 -- Profile: How President Bush may deal with several key abortion issues
Julie Rovner reports on the Bush administration's upcoming decisions regarding federal funding of embryonic stem cell research.

audio button January 13, 2001 -- Analysis: Anti-abortion activists eagerly await George Bush's inauguration; some think abortion issue may not be simple for new president to navigate
As both the Bush inauguration and the anniversary of Roe v. Wade approach, Julie Rovner reports on the issues anti-abortion activists hope that George W. Bush will address when he becomes president, including federal funding of embryonic stem cell research.

audio button December 25, 2000 -- Analysis: Research on mammals regenerating tissues
Richard Knox reports on a study from Children's Hospital in Boston that showed that mouse muscle cells could be turned back into stem cells. The stem cells could then become fat cells, bone cells, and muscle cells again.

audio button November 6, 2000 -- Analysis: Spinal cord injury patients experience new hope with stem cell research
Michelle Trudeau reports on advances in spinal cord injury therapy announced at the Society for Neuroscience meeting. While it was thought for years that nerve cells cannot grow, it has now been shown that both the brain and the spinal cord contain stem cells that are capable of dividing.

audio button October 17, 2000 -- Analysis: Presidential use of executive orders
As campaign 2000 reached its final month, Julie Rovner reported on the use of executive orders. Included in the discussion was the executive order issued by President Clinton that allowed federal funding of embryonic stem cell research.

audio button August 27, 2000 -- Interview: Dr. Arthur Caplan, director of the center for bioethics at the University of Pennsylvania, discusses the ethics of stem cell research
One week after the National Institutes of Health issued guidelines that allowed federal funding for embryonic stem cell research, Jacki Lyden interviews Dr. Arthur Caplan on the ethics of embryonic stem cell use. Also discussed was an earlier decision by the British government to allow the creation of embryos for medical research.

audio button August 23, 2000 -- Analysis: Controversial new guidelines allow federally funded researchers to perform experiments with stem cells taken from human embryos
On the day that the National Institutes of Health guidelines allowing federal funding of embryonic stem cell research were released, Richard Knox reports on the decision, and the controversy that remains. Included is a discussion of how these regulations could change under a Republican administration.

audio button August 23, 2000 -- Analysis: Dr. Ron McKay of the National Institutes of Health talks about what the new stem cell research guidelines mean for him and his research
On the day that the National Institutes of Health guidelines allowing federal funding of embryonic stem cell research were released, Robert Siegel interviews Dr. Ron McKay, a pioneer in stem cell research. McKay details the work done on mouse embryonic stem cells, and the experiments that can now be done with human embryonic stem cells.

audio button August 17, 2000 -- Interview: Richard Nicholson of the Bulletin of Medical Ethics discusses the possible loosening of restrictions on embryo research in the United Kingdom
Following recommendations from a scientific working party, the British government was considering loosening the restrictions on human embryo research. Madeleine Brand interviews Richard Nicholson, the editor of the Bulletin of Medical Ethics, on the ethical issues surrounding the recommendations.

audio button July 12, 2000 -- Analysis: Two groups of scientists report they have successfully transplanted lab-grown cells to repair severely damaged corneas
Wendy Schmelzer reports on two studies that used stem cells to repair damaged human corneas. Each study reported improved eyesight in most patients who underwent the treatment.

audio button June 1, 2000 -- Profile: Scientists in Sweden have converted the brain cells of mice into heart, liver, kidney, and other cells; developments could possibly be useful in humans
David Baron reports on a finding that brain stem cells from mice develop into heart, liver, kidney, and other cells when put into a mouse embryo.

audio button December 18, 1999 -- Profile: Documentary about NPR correspondent Rebecca Perl's bout with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma
Scott Simon interviews Rebecca Perl about her personal experience with a stem cell transplants to treat non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. She was given a transplant of stem cells isolated from her own blood.

audio button December 2, 1999 -- Analysis: Officials at National Institutes of Health believe they have come up with a way around the congressional ban on government-funded embryo research
At a time when regulations banning federal funding of research on human embryos includes research on embryonic stem cells, David Baron reports on a plan to allow embryonic stem cell research. Lawyers at the National Institutes of Health came to the conclusion that embryonic stem cells are not themselves embryos.

audio button July 30, 1999 -- Analysis: Research using embryonic stem cells raises ethics questions
As the Clinton administration reviews the ban on federal funding for embryonic stem cell research, Richard Harris reports that scientists have used embryonic stem cells to treat a brain disease in rats.

audio button June 23, 1999 -- Profile: National Bioethics Advisory Commission debates whether government should fund research on human embryos
As the debate over the use of human embryonic stem cells continues, Joe Palca reports on the ethical issues being taken up by the National Bioethics Advisory Commission.

audio button June 2, 1999 -- Profile: Scientists in Japan develop a new technique for repairing damaged eyes with corneal stem cell transplants
Joe Palca reports on a Japanese group that used stem cells from corneas to repair severe eye damage that cannot be repaired by a cornea transplant.

audio button January 20, 1999 -- Analysis: Ban on human embryo research does not apply to so-called stem cells, according to the National Institutes of Health
Joanne Silberner reports on the finding by the National Institutes of Health that research on embryonic stem cells does not violate the ban on federal funding for research on human embryos.

audio button November 12, 1998 -- Hybrid Cell
Joe Palca reports on an announcement by Advanced Cell Technology that they have grown human cells by putting them into the reproductive cell from a cow. Members of the scientific community express skepticism, as the finding was announced before independent scientists had reviewed it.

audio button November 5, 1998 -- Embryonic stem cell lines
Joe Palca reports on two independent reports that scientists can now grow human embryonic stem cells outside of the body.

Talk of the Nation stem cell coverage:

audio button August 17, 2001 -- Stem cell update
Ira Flatow talks with NPR's Joe Palca about the ongoing stem cell debate.

President Bush and Catholic votersAugust 6, 2001 -- Analysis: President Bush and Catholic Voters
Join Juan Williams for a discussion with political analysts about President Bush and Catholic voters. Among the issues discussed is the debate over stem cell research.
Guests:
•Mark Rozell, professor of politics, Catholic University, Washington, D.C.
• Deal Hudson, Caltholic advisor to President Bush, Editor and Publisher of Catholic magazine, Crisis
• Mara Liasson, NPR's National Political Correspondent

audio button June 26, 2001 -- Analysis: Politics of stem cell research
As anti-abortion members of the Republican Party announce their support of federal funding for embryonic stem cell research, Mara Liasson and guests discuss the ethics and politics of stem cell research.
Guests:
• Julie Rovner, health policy reporter, National Public Radio
• Senator Orrin Hatch, Republican from Utah
• Bill Saunders, senior fellow for human life studies, Family Research Council
• Mort Kondracke, executive editor, Roll Call

audio button June 22, 2001 -- Analysis: Scientific and ethical aspects of stem cell research
As the decision by the Bush administration on stem cell research approaches, Ira Flatow and guests discuss the scientific and ethical aspects of embryonic stem cell research. Two of the speakers spoke from a workshop on stem cell research being held at the National Academy of Sciences that day.
Guests:
• Nicholas Wade, New York Times science writer
• Dr. David Prentice, Indiana State University Professor
• Dr. Donald Orlic, Division of Intramural Research at the National Human Genome Research Institute, staff scientist
• Dr. Irving Weissman, Stanford Medical School professor

audio button March 2, 2001 -- Analysis: Stem Cell research
Ira Flatow and guests discuss recent developments in stem cell research. One study showed that rat embryonic stem cells implanted in rat brains became functioning brain cells. A second study showed that Parkinson's disease in mice and rats could be treated using embryonic stem cells. Also considered is the decision by Health and Human Services Secretary Tommy Thompson to continue accepting applications for federal funding of embryonic stem cell research.
Guests:
• Dr. Evan Snyder, Assistant Professor, Harvard Medical School
• Dr. Glenn McGee, Assistant Professor of bioethics and philosophy, University of Pennsylvania

audio button January 31, 2001 -- Analysis: Politics and ethics of embryonic stem cell research
Juan Williams and guests discuss the science and ethics of stem cell research. The discussion includes how scientists get stem cells. They discuss the reality that eliminating federal funding of stem cells would not stop embryonic stem cell research from going forward with private funds. Also considered are the ethical issues associated with embryonic stem cell research.
Guests:
• Dr. John Fletcher, Professor emeritus, University of Virginia
• Dr. John Gearhart, Professor of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Johns Hopkins University
• Richard Doerflinger, Associate Director of the Secretariat for Pro-Life Activities, National Conference of Catholic Bishops
• Dr. Suzanne Holland, Associate Professor of Religious and Social Ethics, the University of Puget Sound

audio button June 9, 2000 -- Analysis: Latest research on growing stem cells
During the time when embryonic stem cell research could not receive federal funding, Ira Flatow and Dr. Evan Snyder discuss advances in using adult stem cells in human stem cell research. Guest: Dr. Evan Snyder, Assistant Professor of Neurology, Harvard Medical School

audio button December 3, 1999 -- Analysis: How funding for scientific research is apportioned in the United States
Joe Palca and guests discuss how the $20 billion spent by the government on scientific research gets apportioned. Included is a discussion of the decision by the National Institutes of Health to accept applications for the funding of embryonic stem cell research.
Guests:
• Dr. Rita Colwell, director of the National Science Foundation
• Dr. Harold Varmus, director of the National Institutes of Health

audio button January 29, 1999 -- Analysis: Scientists doing research on stem cells derived from human embryos
After the National Institutes of Health ruled that scientists could receive federal funds to perform research on embryonic stem cells, Ira Flatow and guests discuss the decision, and the scientific and ethical issues surrounding it.
Guests:
• Dr. John Gearhart, professor of Gynecology and Obstetrics at Johns Hopkins University
• Dr. Eric Meslin, Executive Director of the National Bioethics Advisory Commission

audio button January 1, 1999 -- The Year in Science
Joe Palca and guests discuss the major science stories of 1998. Included among them is the cultivation of human embryonic stem cells.
Guests:
• Robert Bazell, science correspondent for NBC News
• Paul Raeburn, senior editor for science and technology at Business Week
• Laura Garwin, North American Editor for Nature