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U.S. Supreme Court   2000-2001

U.S. Supreme Court
U.S. Supreme Court
Shortly after the Supreme Court's 2000-01 term opened on Oct. 2, the nine justices found themselves forced into the unprecedented role of ruling in a presidential election. Their final vote in Bush v. Gore split the court along ideological lines and raised concerns about the political polarization of the judicial body. Last term close to a third of their cases -- many of them controversial decisions on abortion, homosexuality and religious schools -- were also decided by a 5-4 margin.

This year the justices, perhaps under greater scrutiny for their political leanings, considers issues ranging from immigration to the medical use of marijuana. And there has been much speculation that two of the court's older conservatives -- Chief Justice William Rehnquist and Sandra Day O'Connor -- might retire now that a Republican president to name their replacements.

Questions?
Want to know more about a case or how the justices rule? Ask Nina Totenberg, the award-winning legal affairs correspondent who's been covering the court for NPR since 1975. We will post her answers here periodically.


NPR Coverage of the Supreme Court's 2000-2001 Term


Supreme Court Overview
Morning Edition, July 6, 2001
audio button NPR's Nina Totenberg reviews the Supreme Court term which ended last week. The court issued many close rulings -- on such topics as immigrants' rights, freedom of speech, and the power of the states. But the session will probably always be remembered for deciding the 2000 presidential election.

O'Connor on Death Penalty
Weekend All Things Considered, July 1, 2001
audio button Host Bob Edwards talks to NPR's Legal Affairs Correspondent Nina Totenberg about Supreme Court Justice Sandra Day O'Connor, who said yesterday she has serious questions about the implementation of the death penalty. Justice O'Connor expressed concern that the system may be executing innocent people.

Supreme Court
Weekend All Things Considered, July 1, 2001
audio button Host Lisa Simeone speaks with immigration law professor Hiroshi Motomura of the University of Colorado about two of this year's Supreme Court decisions, which extend greater rights to immigrants living in this country.

Supreme Court and Civil Rights
All Things Considered, June 29, 2001
audio button Georgetown University Law Professor David Cole comments on the latest U.S. Supreme Court term, which has just come to an end, and how the decisions will affect civil rights.

Supreme Court
Morning Edition, June 29, 2001
audio button NPR's Legal Correspondant Nina Totenberg reports on the Supreme Court's last day in session for this term. The Court issued decisions on immigration, property rights, and tobacco advertising.

Supreme Court Rulings
All Things Considered, June 28, 2001
audio button NPR's Nina Totenberg reports on today's Supreme Court ruling on when the government must pay compensation for forbidding development on private property. Nina also reports on the court's decision that the government may not keep certain immigrants in prison indefinitely. The inmates in question are those who committed certain serious crimes, and are subject to deportation, but whose countries of origin won't take them back.

Supreme Court - Tobacco Ads
All Things Considered, June 28, 2001
audio button NPR's Barbara Bradley reports on today's Supreme Court decision striking down some limits on tobacco advertising in Massachusetts. The restrictions had been suspended pending the court's ruling. Now, for the most part, they will not go into effect. The court said less restrictive federal laws on advertising take precedence.

Supreme Court Rulings
Morning Edition, June 26, 2001
audio button The U.S. Supreme court handed down three major decisions yesterday, on immigration, campaign finance and copyright law. Legal Affairs Correspondent Nina Totenberg examines the impact of the rulings.

Internet Copyright
All Things Considered, June 25, 2001
audio button The Supreme Court ruled that media companies must get permission from freelance writers before reproducing their work in electronic databases. The court rejected publishers' arguments that electronic libraries are "revisions" of newspapers and magazines.

Campaign Finances
All Things Considered, June 25, 2001
audio button The Supreme Court issued a 5-4 ruling that affirms existing limits that political parties may spend on behalf of candidates. The 1986 case, involving the Colorado Republican Party and its campaign against a Democratic Senate hopeful, was closely watched to see if it would have bearing on the campaign-finance reform bill currently working its way through Congress.

Immigration
All Things Considered, June 25, 2001
audio button The Supreme Court ruling gives some legal immigrants access to the courts to fight deportation. The immigrants involved are non-citizens with legal residency who agreed to a plea bargain in a criminal case years ago. They're now threatened with deportation. A 1996 law required non-citizens to be deported for some crimes and cuts them off from federal court review of the deportation orders. The high court's ruling strikes down that law.

Thermal Imaging
Weekly Edition, June 17, 2001
audio button The Supreme Court decides to ban the use of high tech surveillence devices by police attempting to pry into private homes.

Supreme Court
Morning Edition, June 12, 2001
audio button The court ruled to restrict police use of monitoring devices to investigate homes from the outside. It also upheld a law which makes it more complicated for men to obtain citizenship for their foreign-born children than for women, and found that religious groups have as much right to use schools for meeting places as secular organizations.

Thermal Imaging
All Things Considered, June 11, 2001
audio button The Supreme Court ruled that police must get a warrant before using thermal imaging devices to search someone's home. The devices can be aimed at a home from outside to measure the amount of heat emanating from it. In this particular Oregon case, an unusually high temperature reading indicated marijuana growing lights were being used inside.

Citizenship
All Things Considered, June 11, 2001
audio button The Supreme Court said that different citizenship rules can be set for a child born abroad out of wedlock, depending on whether the child's one American parent was his father or his mother. The justices upheld a federal immigration law that gives automatic citizenship to the child if only the mother is American. The law says, if only the father is American, the child can be considered for citizenship if the father legalized the relationship by the time the child turned 18. In the 5-4 ruling, both female justices voted against making gender the deciding factor.

Death Sentence Reprieve
All Things Considered, June 5, 2001
audio button The Supreme Court's decided to invalidate the death sentence of Texas inmate Johnny Paul Penry. Penry was convicted of killing a woman almost 20 years ago, but with the intellect of a seven-year-old, he is also legally retarded.

Death Penalty
All Things Considered, June 4, 2001
audio button The Supreme Court throws out a Texas death sentence against a mentally retarded man. It is the second time the court has thrown out a death sentence against Johnny Paul Penry. This time, the justices ruled that the court that held a new sentencing trial for Penry had not given the jury adequate instructions.

Casey Martin
All Things Considered, May 29, 2001
audio button The Supreme Court ruled that the PGA Tour must allow golfer Casey Martin ride in a cart during tournaments. Martin has a circulatory condition that makes walking long distances painful and has been riding between shots, rather than walking, as the tour rules require. The justices ruled 7-2 that the federal Americans with Disabilities Act requires sports held at places of public accommodation to make reasonable modifications for disabled people. The ruling rejected the Professional Golfers Association's arguments that the cart gives Martin an unfair advantage, and that the tour has the right to set its own rules.

Cell Phone Eavesdropping
All Things Considered, May 21, 2001
audio button The Supreme Court rules that a radio host cannot be sued for airing a tape of an illegally intercepted cell phone call. The 6-3 majority said the First Amendment protects the broadcaster, because he had no role in intercepting the call and the conversation concerned an issue of public policy.

Medical Marijuana
All Things Considered, May 14, 2001
audio button A unanimous U.S. Supreme Court ruled against a California law permitting the use of marijuana for medical purposes. The justices said there is no room in the federal prohibition against marijuana for a medical exception. Nine states have passed laws allowing the medical use of marijuana.

Medical Marijuana
All Things Considered, May 14, 2001
audio button Host Robert Siegel talks with Jack Lewin, CEO of the California Medical Association, about the United States Supreme Court striking down a California law allowing marijuana to be used as medicine.

Oklahoma Bombing Appeal
All Things Considered, May 11, 2001
audio button Following the revelation that the FBI failed to turn over documents on the Oklahoma City, the lawyer for Timoth McVeigh's co-defendant Terry Nichols said he planned to file a new appeal with the Supreme Court.

Discrimination Suits
All Things Considered, May 07, 2001
audio button In a potentially far-reaching decision, the Supreme Court ruled that only the Justice Department can ask courts to enforce certain federal regulations against discrimination. In recent years, enforcement suits have also been filed by private citizens.

Supreme Court Vacancies
All Things Considered, May 02, 2001
audio button Rumors of a Supreme Court justice retiring soon have triggered speculation about who will step in and how that will effect the ideological break down on the bench.

Tobacco Advertising
Morning Edition, April 25, 2001
audio button Tobacco companies are challenging a Massachusetts law that would limit outdoor advertising for their products. They say it's a violation of the right to commercial free speech; Massachusetts says its law is written carefully to prevent the companies from marketing to children.

Misdemeanor Arrests, Bilingualism
All Things Considered, April 24, 2001
audio button Nina Totenberg looks at two 5-4 decisions released by the Supreme Court. One says police may arrest and jail someone for a minor offense, even when the punishment is no more than a fine. The other decision rejected a lawsuit by a woman who sued Alabama for not allowing her to take her driver's test in Spanish.

Voting District Upheld
All Things Considered, April 18, 2001
audio button In a much-watched political battle, the Supreme Court ruled that the drawing of a congressional district did not violate whites' voting rights. The case concerning the lines for North Carolina's 12th district is the fourth time the district has been in litigation over claims that race was the main factor in its configuration.

Free Speech and Advertising
All Things Considered, April 17, 2001
audio button The Supreme Court hears arguments in a case testing whether the federal government violates the free speech of food producers, when it compels them to contribute to national ad campaigns sponsored by the Agriculture Department.

Freelancer Takes Online Case to High Court
Morning Edition, March, 28 2001
audio button The Supreme Court hears a copyright battle between a freelance writer and the New York Times. Writer Jonathan Tasini says the Times didn't OWN his articles, and therefore was not authorized to sell them to online periodicals and CD-ROMS with old issues of the newspaper.

Medical Marijuana
Morning Edition, March, 28 2001
audio button A case before the Supreme Court today examines the legality of marijuana for medical purposes. Californians approved a ballot initiative 5 years ago decriminalizing pot for "medical necessities," but the drug remains illegal in federal law. The federal government argues that its law preempts the state one, since it has exercised the right to make laws approving drugs.

Executing the Mentally Retarded
All Things Considered, March, 27 2001
audio button Oral arguments are heard before the Supreme Court in the case of a mentally retarded man facing a death sentence. Johnny Paul Penry's lawyers say a Texas judge did not properly instruct the jury in his murder trial. They argue the judge should have told the jury to consider Penry's mental capacity before deciding on a life sentence or death.

Job Disputes and Arbitration
Morning Edition, March, 22 2001
audio button Employers can force their employees to forego a court trial, and head straight for binding arbitration in cases of job disputes, the high court ruled. The idea is to reduce the caseload of an already clogged legal system, but employee advocates say arbitration usually gives the employer an unfair advantage.

Drug Testing Pregnant Women
All Things Considered, March, 21 2001
audio button Supreme Court rules that hospitals cannot reinstate a practice of testing pregnant patients for drugs and turning over the results to the police, unless they get the woman's permission first.

Legal Aid and Welfare Suits
All Things Considered, February 28, 2001
audio button The U.S. Congress restricts the use of federally-funded attorneys for lawsuits brought by the poor who have lost their welfare benefits. But the Supreme Court overruled those legal aid limits, arguing the congressional limits unconstitutionally restricted the right to free speech.

Campaign Finance
Morning Edition, February 28, 2001
audio buttonThe US Supreme Court considers how restricted hard-money contributions to political parties can be used in conjunction with specific candidates' campaigns.

Clean Air
All Things Considered, February 27, 2001
audio buttonThe US Supreme Court rules against a multi-industry suit seeking to limit Clean Air Act regulations.

Property Rights
All Things Considered, February 26, 2001
audio buttonThe US Supreme Court heard arguments on a potentially important property rights case. It weighs the rights of developers against those of federal, state and local governments to preserve tidal wetlands along the nation's shoreline. Property Rights
Morning Edition, February 26, 2001
audio buttonThe US Supreme Court hears arguments on a potentially important property rights case in Rhode Island.

Analysis of ADA Ruling
Weekend Edition Sunday, February 25, 2001
audio buttonListen to analysis of the Supreme Court ruling in favor of states' rights when it decided that state employees cannot sue for money damages when they are discriminated against on the basis of disability. Congress had authorized such lawsuits when it enacted the 1990 Americans With Disabilities Act.

ADA Ruling Latest in States' Rights Boost
Weekend All Things Considered, February 24, 2001
audio buttonThe Supreme Court's ruling that the state could not be sued for money damages under the Americans With Disabilities Act was the latest example of the Supreme Court's interpretation favoring states' rights over federal law. Listen to a discussion about how the legal reasoning of the court's majority might come to affect other federal legislation.

Court Rules in Disabilites Case
Morning Edition, February 22, 2001
audio buttonThe conservatives on the Supreme Court weigh in again for states' rights. The high court ruled by a five-to-four vote that state employees may not sue for money damages when they are the victims of job discrimination based on disability

Congress Reacts to ADA Ruling
Morning Edition, February 22, 2001
audio buttonLawmakers respond to the Supreme Court's decision in the Americans with Disabilities Act case. Some worry the high court is usurping their power.

School Sports
Morning Edition, February 22, 2001
audio buttonSupreme Court Rules school sports associations can be sued for recruiting regulations they set up to try to protect students from undue pressures.

Immigration
Morning Edition, February 21, 2001
audio buttonDeportable immigrants who have been convicted of a crime but served their time are still in prison because no country will take them. The Supreme Court considers their plight.

Americans With Disabilities Act
All Things Considered, February 21, 2001
audio button The Supreme Court rules that states cannot be sued by their employees for money damages under the Americans With Disabilities Act. The justices' 5-4 ruling follows a pattern of recent decisions that reduce the power of the federal government over the states.

Gasoline Patent
All Things Considered, February 21, 2001
audio button The Supreme Court upheld a patent held by Unocal Corp. on the reformulated gasoline that is used in California and in many other urban areas around the country. Now the major oil companies will have to begin paying royalties to Unocal, and California residents may face higher gas prices as a result.

Thermal Imaging and Privacy
All Things Considered, February 20, 2001
audio button The Supreme Court considers whether police need a warrant before pointing a thermal imaging device at someone's home. Thermal imaging measures the amount of heat emanating from a building. In this case, it was used to find marijuana being grown indoors with strong lights.

Sexual Predators
All Things Considered, January 17, 2001
audio button Supreme Court rules that states may keep sexual predators incarcerated after they have served their sentences.

Golf Carts in PGA Tournaments
All Things Considered, January 17, 2001
audio button Arguments in the case of disabled golfer Casey Martin, who sued the Professional Golf Association which barred him from riding in a cart during PGA tournaments.

Clean Water
All Things Considered, January 9, 2001
audio button Supreme Court decision on limiting the scope of the federal Clean Water Act. The court split along its familiar ideological lines, 5-4, in ruling that the Army Corps of Engineers can't use the law to forbid the building of a landfill in a migratory bird habitat.

Boy Scouts
All Things Considered, December 18, 2000
audio button Though the Boy Scouts' anti-gay policy was upheld by the Supreme Court, many school districts are distancing themselves from the organization.

Thomas Speaks
All Things Considered, December 14, 2000
audio button Listen to excerpts of some comments made by U.S. Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas to high school students.

Cell Phones
All Things Considered, December 05, 2000
audio button A case tests whether someone can sue if his cell phone call is eavesdropped on, and the information gathered is disclosed. The call in question was conducted by teachers union officials, who made some mention of blowing up the porches of school board members.

Clean Air
All Things Considered, November 7, 2000
audio button Industries and state governments say Congress unconstitutionally delegated too much of its power to the executive branch by requiring the Environmental Protection Agency to establish air quality standards that protect the public health based on the latest science.

Clean Water
All Things Considered, October 31, 2000
audio button Supreme Court considers whether Clean Water regulations apply to a body of water contained within a state, but used as habitat by migrating birds.

ADA Dispute
All Things Considered, October 11, 2000
audio button Two legal challenges to the scope of the Americans with Disabilities Act reached the U.S. Supreme Court Wednesday, with high-profile advocates defending the 10-year-old law. The cases, both from Alabama, focus on two former state employees who say they were harassed and eventually forced out of their jobs because of working conditions the state could have corrected.

Random Drug Stops
All Things Considered, October 3, 2000
audio button Indianapolis launched its drug checkpoints in August of 1998; officers were to stop a predetermined number of cars to check for drugs using drug-sniffing dogs. But challenges to the practice began almost immediately.

Drug Checkpoints
Morning Edition, October 3, 2000
audio button The court began hearing arguments Tuesday on the use of drug checkpoints. At issue is whether it's legal for police to randomly stop drivers and use dogs to check for illegal drugs. Opponents of the tactic say it amounts to illegal search and violates the Fourth Amendment.

'Cheers'
All Things Considered, October 2, 2000
audio button The court let actors George Wendt and John Ratzenberger continue with their lawsuit against the studio that produced the hit television show Cheers. The actors filed suit after Paramount Pictures granted Host International a license to set up Cheers bars in airports around the world. Some of the bars feature two life-size, robotic customers named "Hank" and "Bob." Wendt and Ratzenberger contend the robots violated their rights of publicity. NPR's Ina Jaffe has the story.

Supreme Court Preview
Morning Edition, October 2, 2000
audio button NPR's Nina Totenberg takes a look at some of the cases the high court will hear this term.


NPR Coverage of the Supreme Court's 1999-2000 Term


Wrap-Up of the 1999-2000 Term
Morning Edition, July 11, 2000
audio button NPR's Nina Totenberg looks back at the Supreme Court's decisions which included some of the most emotional social issues of the day -- abortion, school prayer, and the right of the Boy Scouts to exclude gay scout leaders.

Trends on the Court
Morning Edition, July 10, 2000
audio button The 1999-2000 term saw court rulings that reflect the justices' increased propensity to strike down federal laws. The court struck down several major federal laws and invalidated the Food and Drug Administration's attempt to regulate tobacco as a drug. NPR's Nina Totenberg reports that some legal scholars see the trend as a return to earlier periods in the court's history, when it more aggressively scrutinized federal laws and policies.

Abortion Rulings
All Things Considered, June 28, 2000
audio button In a 5-4 ruling, the court declared unconstitutional a Nebraska law outlawing certain late-term abortions. Twenty-nine states have similar laws, and Congress has tried twice to impose a similar ban on the procedure that opponents call "partial-birth abortion." The court also upheld, 6-3, a Colorado state law requiring abortion protestors to stay at least eight feet away from anyone entering or leaving a health care facility. The ruling gives states greater leeway to restrict anti-abortion demonstrations outside health clinics.

Boy Scouts
All Things Considered, June 28, 2000
audio button The justices, in a 5-4 decision, ruled that the Boy Scouts can bar homosexuals from serving as troop leaders. The ruling says the Scouts, as a private organization, have freedoms of expression and association that allow the group to set their own qualifications for scoutmasters. Listen to this report from NPR's Barbara Bradley.

Federal Money for Parochial Schools
All Things Considered, June 28, 2000
audio buttonThe court ruled 6-3 that federal tax money can be used to buy educational material for private schools. Listen to this report from NPR's Larry Abramson.

Miranda Warning Upheld
All Things Considered, June 26, 2000
audio button The Supreme Court rules that police must continue to warn criminal suspects that they have the "right to remain silent" when questioned, a 7-2 decision upholding the 1966 landmark Miranda ruling.

California Open Primary Rejected
All Things Considered, June 26, 2000
audio button The Supreme Court throws out California's wide-open, "blanket" primary system, ruling that the system isn't fair to political parties because it allows voters to cross party lines in primary elections. Listen to this report from NPR's Barbara Bradley.

No School 'Game' Prayers
All Things Considered, June 19, 2000
audio button Delivering a crushing blow to school-prayer supporters, the Supreme Court declares that prayer in public schools must be private. The decision upholds the beliefe that such prayers violate the constitutionally required separation of government and religion.

State Business Boycotts for Human Rights
All Things Considered, June 19, 2000
audio button Justices unanimously favor making it more difficult for states to boycott companies doing business in nations known for human rights abuses.The decision threw out a Massachusetts law limiting state purchases from companies engaged in commerce with Myanmar, also known as Burma. The justices said federal sanctions pre-empt any state law against Myanmar.

Patients Bill of Rights
Morning Edition, June 12, 2000
audio buttonThe Supreme Court rules that members of health maintenance organizations cannot sue their HMO's, under existing federal law, for giving doctors financial incentives to cut medical costs. The decision is expected to intensify the election year debate over the need for a federal Patients' Bill of Rights.

Webster Hubbell Case
Morning Edition, June 8, 2000
audio button The Supreme Court has dismissed a tax charge against Webster Hubbell, saying he could not be prosecuted with documents he was forced to provide under immunity. Hubbell -- a friend of Bill and Hillary Clinton -- was the first big fish reeled in by independent counsel Ken Starr's Whitewater probe.

Grandparents' Rights
Morning Edition, June 6, 2000
audio button The Supreme Court has made it harder for grandparents to sue for the right to see their grandchildren. The high court struck down a law in Washington state that gave grandparents broad rights to go to court when there was disagreement with the parents over access to the children.

Federal-State Relationships
All Things Considered, May 22, 2000
audio buttonSeveral rulings from the high court touch on the federal-state relationship. The court narrowed the scope of a law that allows citizens to sue on behalf of the federal government when federal funds are misused in programs run by states. The justices also ruled that individuals can not use state product liability laws to sue automakers for not having air bags in cars built before federal regulations required them.

Federal Rape Suits Rejected
Morning Edition, May 16, 2000
audio button The court has thrown out part of the federal Violence Against Women Act, ruling it is an intrusion on the rights of states. By a 5 to 4 margin, the justices ruled that rape already is covered by state laws and does not have enough connection with areas of federal concern to bring it under federal law. The case involved a former Virginia Polytechnic Institute student who accused two football players of raping her.

Gay Boy Scout Leaders
All Things Considered, April 26, 2000
audio button Nina Totenberg reports on arguments before the Supreme Court on whether the Boy Scouts can bar gays from being troop leaders. The main question is, are the Boy Scouts a public accommodation and therefore forbidden to discriminate? Or is the group a private association, constitutionally free exclude anyone it chooses? The court is reviewing a case from New Jersey.

Abortion Revisited
All Things Considered, April 25, 2000
audio button Nina Totenberg reports on oral arguments before the Supreme Court on so-called "partial birth" abortions. The case involves a Nebraska law, which supporters say outlaws a particularly gruesome type of abortion, which could be seen as infanticide. Opponents of the law say, medically, the term "partial birth" abortion has no meaning, and the law is broad enough to prohibit most second-trimester abortions. Activists on both sides of the issue carried signs and chanted outside the Supreme Court.

Blanket Primaries
All Things Considered, April 24, 2000
audio button The Supreme Court heard arguments regarding California's so-called blanket primary, which allows voters to pick among candidates from all parties when choosing nominees for federal and state office. The parties argue that such shop-around rules, however popular, violate party members' constitutional rights to free association. And the line of questioning from several justices suggested that argument would carry considerable weight with the court.

Miranda Revisited
All Things Considered, April 19, 2000
audio button The Supreme Court heard oral arguments revisiting the famous Miranda warnings. The justices are deciding whether the Constitution requires police to inform suspects of their right to remain silent and to have an attorney present during questioning. The court will decide whether a mostly ignored law passed by Congress in 1968 makes some confessions given in the absence of the warnings admissible in court.

Rail Crossings & Searches
All Things Considered, April 17, 2000
audio button The Supreme Court issued a decision saying police who squeeze someone's luggage to try to tell what is in it must follow constitutional rules for searches. In another case, the justices ruled that railroads can't be sued because of inadequate warning devices at crossings when the devices are installed and paid for under a federally approved project.

Public Nudity
Morning Edition, March 30, 2000
audio button The court ruled for the second time that local governments can ban nude dancing. The justices were deeply splintered in their reasoning, with no majority agreeing on a single point. The ruling is similar to a 1991 case when the court upheld an Indiana law banning public nudity.

School Prayer Revisited
All Things Considered, March 29, 2000
audio button The U.S. Supreme Court revisited the issue of prayer in public schools. This time, though, the question is not prayer in the classroom nor graduation ceremony prayers, but whether students can lead a prayer before public high school football games.

Police Searches
All Things Considered, March 29, 2000
audio buttonThe court ruled that police generally cannot use an anonymous tip to stop and search someone for a gun. In a unanimous decision, the justices said that Miami police acted unlawfully in 1995 by searching and arresting a juvenile based on an anonymous tip.

Human Rights Issues
Morning Edition, March 22, 2000
audio button The court heard arguments in a case that tests whether state and local governments can refuse to buy goods and services from companies that do business with countries with bad human rights records. The case involves a Massachusetts law that's directed against Burma, also known as Myanmar.

FDA and Tobacco
Morning Edition, March 22, 2000
audio button The Supreme Court struck down the Food and Drug Administration's authority to regulate tobacco products. The FDA had based its authority on the argument that tobacco contains the addictive drug, nicotine. But in a 5 to 4 decision, the court ruled that it's up to Congress to give the FDA the specific power to regulate tobacco.

Student Activity Fees
All Things Considered, March 22, 2000
audio button The court ruled that colleges and universities can give student activity fees to groups whose speech offends some other students. In a unanimous decision, the justices ruled against a student of the University of Wisconsin who argued that the mandatory student fee system violates his First Amendment rights by forcing him to subsidize speech he finds objectionable.

Police Stops & Drivers' Licenses
Morning Edition, January 13, 2000
audio button In two decisions from the court, one ruling attempted to lay down guidelines for when police can stop a fleeing suspect without evidence that a crime was committed. Another decision ran counter to recent rulings supporting states' rights, the court ruled that states do not have the right to sell personal information gathered from driver's licenses.


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