Rob Jones and Oksana Masters will compete in adaptive rowing at the London Olympics this week. Jones is a former U.S. Marine who lost both legs to an improvised land mine in southern Afghanistan. David Gilkey/NPR hide caption

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Doing It To Win: Veterans Raise Bar At Paralympics

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Homeless veterans, their families and volunteers stand in line for food at "Stand Down," an annual event hosted by the Veterans Village of San Diego. The VA estimates that about 67,000 vets are homeless. David Gilkey/NPR hide caption

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A New Generation Of Vets Faces Challenges At Home

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Obama, Romney Court Veterans In Key States

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Afghans Worry Bagram Could Turn Into Guantanamo

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Afghans Who Helped U.S. Forces Still Hope For Visas

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A U.S. soldier watches members of the Afghan Public Protection Force arrive at the transition ceremony on the outskirts of the Afghan capital Kabul on March 15. The APPF replaces all private security contractors in the country. Ahmad Jamshid/AP hide caption

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Afghan Public Protection Force Replaces Contractors

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The Afghan government wants Muslim preachers to tone down sermons that often criticize the presence of American troops and praise the Taliban. Here, an Afghan youth drags his sheep past a group of men praying at a mosque in Kabul in November 2011. Muhammed Muheisen/AP hide caption

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Afghan Goal: Toning Down The Radical Preachers

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Manullah Ahmadzai, 27, lost the sight in his right eye while serving as a front-line soldier in the Afghan military. Ahmadzai is one of many soldiers who have been severely injured and say promised government benefits don't always arrive. David Gilkey/NPR hide caption

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For Afghan Soldiers, A Battle For Respect

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Taliban Claims Responsibility For Kabul Attack

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Afghan women pass U.S. soldiers near Bagram Air Base outside Kabul in 2010. While conditions for Afghan women have improved over the past decade, but they still face many restrictions, as well as abuses like honor killings. Joel Saget/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Facing Death, Afghan Girl Runs To U.S. Military

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Deal Reached On U.S.-Afghan Strategic Partnership

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Taliban Claims Responsibility For Afghan Attacks

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Afghanistan Hit By Deadly Attacks

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Afghan miners in a makeshift emerald mine in the Panjshir Valley in 2010. Reports suggest that Afghanistan is sitting on significant deposits of oil, gas, copper, iron, gold and coal, as well as a range of precious gems like emeralds and rubies. Currently these minerals are largely untapped and are still being mapped. Majid Saeedi/Getty Images hide caption

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Dreams Of A Mining Future On Hold In Afghanistan

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