Afghans hold portraits of former President Burhanuddin Rabbani, as they shout anti-government slogans during a demonstration in Kabul on Tuesday. Last week's killing of Rabbani, an ethnic Tajik, was the latest targeting his party and it has stoked fears of increased factionalism. Shah Marai/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Afghan Factions Vie For Position Amid Civil War Fears

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Afghans carry the coffin of Afghanistan High Peace Council head and former President Burhanuddin Rabbani during his burial ceremony in Kabul, Sept. 23. A suicide bomber assassinated Rabbani on Sept. 20, which further complicates the thorny issue of negotiating with the Taliban. Ahmad Masood/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Killing Deals Another Blow To Afghan Peace Talks

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Sakina sits with her 18-month-old son, Shafiq, at a women's shelter in Bamiyan, in central Afghanistan, last October. Sakina spent seven months in prison for leaving a forced marriage. The Afghan government recently backed down from a plan to take control of women's shelters, and women's groups are hailing it as a victory. Paula Bronstein/Getty Images hide caption

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Afghan Women Fight Back, Preserve Shelters

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Afghanistan's Former President Rabbani Assassinated

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Protesters in Kabul demonstrate against the results of last September's parliamentary poll, Jan. 23. A year after the elections were held, Afghan President Hamid Karzai and lawmakers are still fighting over the results, and the Parliament has accomplished very little. Musadeq Sadeq/AP hide caption

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Afghan Parliament Still Stymied By Election Dispute

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20-Hour Insurgent Attack Ends In Afghan Capital

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Insurgents Fire On U.S. Embassy In Afghan Capital

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Rockets Fired At U.S. Embassy In Kabul

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77 U.S. Troops Wounded In Taliban Truck Bomb

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Shown here in 1997, the "Lion of the Panjshir," Ahmad Shah Massoud (left), fought against the Soviets in the 1980s, was a central figure in the Afghan civil war of the '90s and led the resistance against the Taliban until his death on Sept. 9, 2001, the victim of al-Qaida suicide bombers. Emmanuel Dunand/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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In Afghanistan, Assessing A Rebel Leader's Legacy

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Afghanistan is a country of the young: According to best estimates, at least half the population was under age 10 when the Sept. 11 attacks took place a decade ago. Now, a generation of Afghans has very little knowledge about the events that so transformed their country. In this photo, Afghan children gather for school in Old Kabul in August 2010. Yuri Cortez/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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For Young Afghans, History's Lessons Lost?

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U.S. Marines patrol with Afghan forces through a harvested poppy field in Northern Marjah in southern Afghanistan's Helmand province, June 6, 2011. Ten years after the fall of the Taliban, progress on U.S. pledges to help Afghanistan is mixed. David Gilkey/NPR/Redux hide caption

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In Afghanistan, Reviewing A Decade Of Promises

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U.S. soldiers check for land mines on a canal running through Highway 1 in Afghanistan's Kandahar province, Aug. 6. Improvised explosive devices, or IEDs, are the Taliban's weapon of choice and are the leading killer of civilians and soldiers in Afghanistan. Romeo Gacad/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Training Afghans To Take Over Bomb-Defusing

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Incarcerated children sit at the Kabul Juvenile Rehabilitation Center May 18, in Kabul, Afghanistan. The four boys were believed to have been recruited by the Taliban as suicide bombers. In an end-of-Ramadan tradition, President Hamid Karzai recently ordered the release of two dozen children held as suspected suicide bombers. Paula Bronstein/Getty Images hide caption

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Afghan President Pardons Would-Be Suicide Bombers

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Tayyeb Agha at a Taliban press conference in November 2001 in Kandahar, Afghanistan. Patrick Aventurier/Gamma/Getty hide caption

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The Taliban's Likely Negotiator With The U.S.

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