Bruce Auster 2016 square
Stephen Voss/NPR
Stephen Voss/NPR
Bruce Auster 2016
Stephen Voss/NPR

Bruce Auster

Collaborative Coverage Senior Editor

Bruce Auster is NPR's Collaborative Coverage Senior Editor. The Collaborative Coverage role is an important one for the public radio system as we work to establish a new way forward for NPR and the newsrooms of NPR Member Stations. In this new position, Bruce will work to develop more and better relationships between Member Stations, NPR desks, shows and other newsroom teams to benefit audiences across all of our platforms. He moved into this role in 2015.

Previously, Bruce Auster served as NPR's National Security Editor. He headed the unit from its establishment in 2008 to 2015. In that role, Auster directed NPR's coverage of international security issues from Washington – including stories involving the U.S. military, the National Security Council, and the intelligence community. As National Security editor Auster, coordinated coverage across NPR News desks and beats. He worked closely with the Foreign Desk, Digital Media, and with reporters, editors, and producers on the National Desk.

Before taking on that role, Auster was the Senior Supervising Editor of NPR's Morning Edition for five years. In that role, he defined the editorial agenda for the show, identifying subjects and specific stories Morning Edition should be covering and then helping bring those stories to the air. Auster worked with Morning Edition hosts Steve Inskeep and Renee Montagne to bring listeners interviews with leading political, international, and cultural figures.

Before joining NPR, Auster spent sixteen years as a reporter and editor at US News and World Report. He was the magazine's Pentagon correspondent for five years, covering stories from the first Gulf War to the early years of the Clinton administration. Later he did a stint covering national security and the intelligence community. Auster also served as US News's White House correspondent for two years, covering the Clinton White House and the 1996 presidential campaign. He made the jump from reporting to editing at the magazine: He was deputy national and foreign editor and later became deputy investigations editor. In that position, Auster helped direct the magazine's award-winning reporting. The investigative team broke many big stories – the subjects included Pentagon weapons scandals; billion-dollar waste in student loan programs, and the Bush administration's flawed intelligence before the Iraq war.

[+] read more[-] less

Former Blackwater Security Guards Found Guilty In Iraq Shootings

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/358120386/358120387" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Fiery British Imam Found Guilty Of Terrorism Charges

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/313996790/313996791" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

U.S. Monitors For Cyber Operations In Crimea Standoff

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/289994158/289994162" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Drawn By Twitter And Trained In Syria, Terrorists Could Turn West

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/283999741/283999743" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

With A Citizen In The Crosshairs, Where's The Line Drawn For Drones?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/276522376/276522377" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

U.S. Assistant Secretary of State Victoria Nuland leaves a news conference at the U.S. Embassy in Kiev on Friday. A phone call of hers about Ukraine was leaked on the Internet. Gleb Garanich/Reuters/Landov hide caption

toggle caption
Gleb Garanich/Reuters/Landov

A Possible Explanation For How U.S. Diplomat's Call Was Tapped

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/273181826/273577647" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

In this photo released in March by the North's Korean Central News Agency (KCNA), leader Kim Jong Un is said to be using a pair of binoculars to look south during an inspection of army troops stationed on two islands. /Xinhua /Landov hide caption

toggle caption
/Xinhua /Landov

A scarred blast wall bears witness to the thousands of munitions exploded at a test site on the Aberdeen Proving Ground, a sprawling Army base north of Baltimore. John Poole/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
John Poole/NPR

Search Is On To Protect Troops From Deadly IEDs

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/114179863/114195016" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Military Faces Tough Choices In Obama's Budget

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/101207733/101208615" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript