David Jackson (left) and Dave Petrillo of Coffee Joulies brought in more than $300,000 using Kickstarter.com. Paul Agus/Courtesy of Coffee Joulies hide caption

itoggle caption Paul Agus/Courtesy of Coffee Joulies

Elizabeth Warren, assistant to the president and special adviser to the Treasury secretary on the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, testifies before a House Oversight Committee hearing on Tuesday. Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images

Brian and Jennifer Barfield met at a networking group for the unemployed. This is one of their engagement photos. Courtesy of the Barflields hide caption

itoggle caption Courtesy of the Barflields

Ads like these — from the Electronic Payments Coalition — appear in about 100 rail cars within the Washington, D.C., Metrorail system. Ryan Brooks/NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Ryan Brooks/NPR

Petraeus speaks during a news conference in Washington in January, as White House adviser Elizabeth Warren looks on. Jay Mallin/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption Jay Mallin/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Lisa Howland says her husband, Randy, smiles a lot more now that he's working, even though the job doesn't pay enough to cover all their bills. Tamara Keith/NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Tamara Keith/NPR

Many entrepreneurs are earning money from posting how-to videos on YouTube on a range of subjects including tying ties. iStockphoto.com hide caption

itoggle caption iStockphoto.com

Annica Trotter prepares for a day at work at her new job as a receptionist. Tamara Keith/NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Tamara Keith/NPR

Roni Chambers, executive director of Go! Network (right), checks in Jennifer Barfield, 47, and her husband, Brian Barfield, 53, at a job networking meeting in downtown St. Louis. Whitney Curtis for NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Whitney Curtis for NPR

Annica Trotter, 25, is feeling financially stressed by her job search. She recently had to cancel her Internet service and car insurance. Whitney Curtis for NPR hide caption

itoggle caption Whitney Curtis for NPR

Former Fannie Mae CEO Franklin Raines (right) testifies on Capitol Hill in December 2008. Former Freddie Mac CEO Leland Brendsel (center) and former Fannie Mae chief Daniel Mudd (left) listen. Susan Walsh/AP hide caption

itoggle caption Susan Walsh/AP