Tamara Keith - 2015 i
Tom Kise
Tamara Keith - 2015
Tom Kise

Tamara Keith

White House Correspondent

Tamara Keith is a NPR White House Correspondent. She is especially focused on matters related to the economy and the Federal budget.

Prior to moving into her current role in January 2014, she was a Congressional Correspondent covering Congress with an emphasis on the budget, taxes and the ongoing fiscal fights. During the Republican presidential primaries she covered Herman Cain, Newt Gingrich in South Carolina, and traveled with Mitt Romney leading into the primaries in Colorado and Ohio, among other states. She began covering congress in August 2011.

Keith joined NPR in 2009 as a Business Reporter. In that role, she reported on topics spanning the business world from covering the debt downgrade and debt ceiling crisis to the latest in policy debates, legal issues and technology trends. In early 2010, she was on the ground in Haiti covering the aftermath of the country's disastrous earthquake and later she covered the oil spill in the Gulf. In 2011, Keith conceived and reported the 2011 NPR series The Road Back To Work, a year-long series featuring the audio diaries of six people in St. Louis who began the year unemployed and searching for work.

Keith has deep roots in public radio and got her start in news by writing and voicing essays for NPR's Weekend Edition Sunday as a teenager. While in college, she launched her career at NPR Member Station KQED's California Report, covering topics including agriculture and the environment. In 2004, Keith began working at NPR Member Station WOSU in Columbus, Ohio, where she reported on politics and the 2004 presidential campaign.

Keith went back to California to open the state capital bureau for NPR Member Station KPCC/Southern California Public Radio. In 2006, Keith returned to KQED, serving as the Sacramento-region reporter for two years.

In 2001, Keith began working on B-Side Radio, an hour-long public radio show and podcast that she co-founded, produced, hosted, edited, and distributed for nine years.

Over the course of her career Keith has been the recipient of numerous accolades, including an award for best news writing from the APTRA California/Nevada and a first place trophy from the Society of Environmental Journalists for "Outstanding Story Radio." Keith was a 2010-2011 National Press Foundation Paul Miller Washington Reporting Fellow.

Keith earned a bachelor's degree in Philosophy from University of California, Berkeley, and a master's degree at the UCB Graduate School of Journalism. Tamara is also a member of the Bad News Babes, a media softball team that once a year competes against female members of Congress in the Congressional Women's Softball game.

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A roller derby scrimmage in Albuquerque, N.M. Three of the women participating — Lauren Winkler, Leigh Featherstone and Holly Chamberlin — have kept their support of Hillary Clinton quiet. Tamara Keith/NPR hide caption

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Why Some Clinton Supporters Are Not 'Really Ready To Go Public'
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Clinton Violated Policies By Using Private Email, State Department Report Says
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As Primary Drags On, Sanders Supporters Grow More Opposed To Clinton
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Hillary Clinton addresses a town hall hosted by the AFL-CIO in Detroit in 2007. During the 2008 campaign, Clinton said the U.S. should take a timeout on trade deals after supporting NAFTA in the 1990s. Carlos Osorio/AP hide caption

toggle caption Carlos Osorio/AP
Evolution Or Expediency? Clinton's Changing Positions Over A Long Career
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Nevada Incident Could Make It Difficult For Sanders' Supporters To Back Clinton
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Courtney Griffin died at age 20 from an overdose of heroin and fentanyl. She was turned away from a treatment center less than two months earlier when her insurance was declined. Courtesy of the Griffin family hide caption

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Politics In Real Life: Dying From Overdose While Waiting For Treatment
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Presidential Candidates Confront Obstacles To Opioid Addiction Treatment
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Democratic presidential candidate Bernie Sanders addresses the crowd Tuesday during a campaign rally at the Big Four Lawn park in Louisville, Ky. John Sommers II/Getty Images hide caption

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The Political Moment Finally Caught Up To Bernie Sanders' Message
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Hillary Clinton Looks To Upcoming Primaries To Solidify Campaign
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While The GOP Race Is Essentially Over, Democrats Press On
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Nancy Glynn, her husband, Michael Gebo, and their son, Hunter, attend a minor league baseball game near their home in Manchester, N.H. Courtesy of Nancy Glynn hide caption

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Politics In Real Life: Paid Family Leave A Big Concern, Not A Top Campaign Issue
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Bernie Sanders addresses supporters on Coney Island Boardwalk ahead of the April 19 New York primary. Pacific Press/LightRocket via Getty Images hide caption

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After String Of Losses, Sanders Campaign To Lay Off 'Hundreds' Of Staffers
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Hillary Clinton Pivots Toward General Election After Primary Wins
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Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton speaks at her primary election night rally in Philadelphia. Matt Rourke/AP hide caption

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With The Nomination All But Decided, Clinton's And Sanders' Goals Change
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Hillary Clinton Hopes To Extend Delegate Lead As She Eyes General Election
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