Carrie Johnson 2010 i
Doby Photography/NPR
Carrie Johnson 2010
Doby Photography/NPR

Carrie Johnson

Justice Correspondent

Carrie Johnson is a Justice Correspondent for the Washington Desk.

She covers a wide variety of stories about justice issues, law enforcement and legal affairs for NPR's flagship programs Morning Edition and All Things Considered, as well as the Newscasts and NPR.org.

While in this role, Johnson has chronicled major challenges to the landmark voting rights law, a botched law enforcement operation targeting gun traffickers along the Southwest border, and the Obama administration's deadly drone program for suspected terrorists overseas.

Prior to coming to NPR in 2010, Johnson worked at the Washington Post for 10 years, where she closely observed the FBI, the Justice Department and criminal trials of the former leaders of Enron, HealthSouth and Tyco. Earlier in her career, she wrote about courts for the weekly publication Legal Times.

Outside of her role at NPR, Johnson regularly moderates or appears on legal panels for the American Bar Association, the American Constitution Society, the National Association of Criminal Defense Lawyers, and others. She's talked about her work on CNN, MSNBC, Fox News, PBS, and other outlets.

Her work has been honored with awards from the Society for Professional Journalists and the Society of American Business Editors and Writers. She has been a finalist for the Loeb award for financial journalism and for the Pulitzer Prize in breaking news for team coverage of the massacre at Fort Hood, Texas.

Johnson is a graduate of the University of Wisconsin-Madison and Benedictine University in Illinois.

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'It's Just The Beginning Now,' Says Man Freed From Serving 2 Life Sentences
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Justice Department Files Complaint Against North Carolina Over Bathroom Law
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Federal investigators have interviewed Huma Abedin and other top Hillary Clinton aides as part of an ongoing investigation into the candidate's use of a private email server as secretary of state. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Attorney General Loretta Lynch tours a factory where inmates work at the Talladega Federal Correctional Institution in Talladega, Ala. on April 29, 2016. Evan Vucci/AP hide caption

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Training Helps Inmates Build A Bridge To Life Outside Prison Walls
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"This is the best chance in a generation to reform our federal drug sentencing law," Sen. Richard Durbin (center) said Thursday. He and other lawmakers held a news conference about proposed criminal sentencing reform legislation. Al Drago/CQ-Roll Call,Inc. hide caption

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Former New Orleans Police Officers Plead Guilty In Danziger Bridge Incident
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A solitary confinement cell at New York City's Rikers Island jail. Bebeto Matthews/AP hide caption

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Solitary Confinement Is What Destroyed My Son, Grieving Mom Says
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"It's very important to keep technology that can cause the loss of American lives and others out of the hands of those that would do us harm, be they rogue nations or terrorists," said Assistant Attorney General for National Security John Carlin. Getty Images hide caption

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Hillary Clinton arrives to testify at a House Select Committee on Benghazi hearing in Washington, D.C., in October. Pete Marovich/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Officials Scrutinized Over Classified Information, But Rarely Found Criminal
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Clinton Email Probe Recalls Past Scrutiny Over Classified Information
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Justice Department Voting Rights Unit Adapts After Supreme Court Ruling
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Justice Department Charges 7 Iranians For Hacking U.S. Banks
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Justice Department Reaches Agreement With Ferguson, Mo., Over Police Practices
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