Carrie Johnson 2016
Linda Fittante/NPR
Carrie Johnson 2016
Linda Fittante/NPR

Carrie Johnson

Justice Correspondent

Carrie Johnson is a Justice Correspondent for the Washington Desk.

She covers a wide variety of stories about justice issues, law enforcement and legal affairs for NPR's flagship programs Morning Edition and All Things Considered, as well as the Newscasts and NPR.org.

While in this role, Johnson has chronicled major challenges to the landmark voting rights law, a botched law enforcement operation targeting gun traffickers along the Southwest border, and the Obama administration's deadly drone program for suspected terrorists overseas.

Prior to coming to NPR in 2010, Johnson worked at the Washington Post for 10 years, where she closely observed the FBI, the Justice Department and criminal trials of the former leaders of Enron, HealthSouth and Tyco. Earlier in her career, she wrote about courts for the weekly publication Legal Times.

Outside of her role at NPR, Johnson regularly moderates or appears on legal panels for the American Bar Association, the American Constitution Society, the National Association of Criminal Defense Lawyers, and others. She's talked about her work on CNN, MSNBC, Fox News, PBS, and other outlets.

Her work has been honored with awards from the Society for Professional Journalists and the Society of American Business Editors and Writers. She has been a finalist for the Loeb award for financial journalism and for the Pulitzer Prize in breaking news for team coverage of the massacre at Fort Hood, Texas.

Johnson is a graduate of the University of Wisconsin-Madison and Benedictine University in Illinois.

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Lawmakers On The Hill Grill FBI Director Over Email Investigations

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Clinton, Trump Clash Over Stop And Frisk In First Debate

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Police crime tape is displayed at the scene where a 16-year-old was shot and killed and an 18-year-old was shot and wounded on April 25 in Chicago. Joshua Lott/Getty Images hide caption

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Joshua Lott/Getty Images

FBI: Murders Up Nearly 11 Percent In 2015; Violent Crime Rose Slightly

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Police and protesters at Cleveland Public Square on the final day of the Republican National Convention in July in Cleveland. Dominick Reuter/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Dominick Reuter/AFP/Getty Images

The Issues: How Clinton And Trump Come Down On Law And Order

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A police officer looks at evidence at the scene of a fatal shooting on Aug. 6 in the University Village neighborhood of Chicago. Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune/TNS via Getty Images hide caption

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Erin Hooley/Chicago Tribune/TNS via Getty Images

Study: Violent Crime And Murders Slightly On The Rise This Year In Largest Cities

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Platform Check: Presidential Candidates On Legalizing Marijuana

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Abid Qureshi, a partner at the law firm Latham & Watkins, has been nominated to fill a spot on the federal court in Washington, D.C. Latham & Watkins LLP via AP hide caption

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Latham & Watkins LLP via AP

Obama Nominates First Muslim To Federal Court

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FBI Releases New Documents Related To Clinton Email Probe

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Protesters shout as people wait to enter a Hillary Clinton campaign event last month in Nevada. Donald Trump is calling for a special prosecutor to investigate allegations of pay-to-play by Clinton, but the history of independent counsels and special prosecutors suggests they don't always remove politics from the process. Josh Edelson/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Josh Edelson/AFP/Getty Images

Trump Wants A Special Prosecutor For Clinton. But They Can Be Political Weapons, Too

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Obama Commutes 111 Prison Sentences; DOJ Working To Clear Backlog

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President Obama toured the El Reno Federal Correctional Institution in Oklahoma last year, the first sitting U.S. president to visit a federal prison. Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images

Obama Grants Clemency To 111 Prisoners; DOJ 'Confident' It Will Clear Backlog

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Former Navy SEAL Matthew Bissonnette has agreed to forfeit "all of the proceeds" he received from No Easy Day, his book about the killing of Osama bin Laden. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Justice Department To Move Away From Using Private Prisons

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